romp

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably a variant of ramp.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -ɒmp
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

romp (third-person singular simple present romps, present participle romping, simple past and past participle romped)

  1. (intransitive) To play about roughly, energetically or boisterously.
    • When the kids're allowed to romp in the bedroom, they break something.
  2. (transitive, US) (Often used with down) To press forcefully, to encourage vehemently, to oppress.
    • If I romp down on the gas, it'll do sixty in six seconds.
    • Coach Smith had to romp on 'em to get 'em out of a losing streak.
  3. To win easily.
  4. (with adverb) To move with little effort relatively quickly.
    We romped along with the wind astern.
    • 1959 October, Cecil J. Allen, “Locomotive Running Past and Present”, in Trains Illustrated, page 477:
      From Crewe, of course, the ten-coach load of 347/370 tons was a laughably easy proposition for the two engines, between them in effect making up Class "11" power, and they fairly romped away with the train.
  5. (slang) To engage in playful or boisterous sex.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

romp (plural romps)

  1. (now archaic) Someone who romps; especially, a girl or young woman who indulges in boisterous play; a tomboy. [from 17th c.]
    • 1792, Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman[1]:
      I will venture to affirm, that a girl, whose spirits have not been damped by inactivity, or innocence tainted by false shame, will always be a romp, and the doll will never excite attention unless confinement allows her no alternative.
  2. A period of boisterous play, a frolic; now especially, a bout of sexual activity, especially when illicit. [from 18th c.]
    • Sex romp at Windsor castle (headline in The Sun)
  3. An enjoyable, fast-paced but essentially inconsequential film, play, or other piece of entertainment. [from 19th c.]
  4. (chiefly sports) A decisive victory; a game, match etc. which is won easily. [from 20th c.]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

romp (plural rompe)

  1. skirt

Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

romp

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of rompre
  2. second-person singular imperative form of rompre

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch romp, from Proto-Germanic *rumpa-, which could be related to *hrimpaną (to wrinkle). Also compare Proto-Slavic *rǫbiti (to chop).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

romp m (plural rompen, diminutive rompje n)

  1. trunk, torso
  2. (ship) hull

Lombard[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Akin to Italian rompere, from Latin rumpere.

Verb[edit]

romp

  1. to break