rook

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Rook and röök

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɹʊk/
  • (sometimes in Northern England; otherwise obsolete) IPA(key): /ɹuːk/[1]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʊk

Etymology 1[edit]

A rook (bird)

From Middle English rok, roke, from Old English hrōc, from Proto-West Germanic *hrōk, from Proto-Germanic *hrōkaz (compare Old Norse hrókr, Saterland Frisian Rouk, Dutch roek, obsolete German Ruch), from Proto-Indo-European *kerk- (crow, raven) (compare Old Irish cerc (hen), Old Prussian kerko (loon, diver), dialectal Bulgarian кро́кон (krókon, raven), Ancient Greek κόραξ (kórax, crow), Old Armenian ագռաւ (agṙaw), Avestan 𐬐𐬀𐬵𐬭𐬐𐬀𐬙𐬀𐬝(kahrkatat̰, rooster), Sanskrit कृकर (kṛkara, rooster)), Ukrainian крук (kruk, raven).

Noun[edit]

rook (plural rooks)

  1. A European bird, Corvus frugilegus, of the crow family.
    • 1768, Thomas Pennant, British Zoology, 168:
      But what distinguishes the rook from the crow is the bill; the nostrils, chin, and sides of that and the mouth being in old birds white and bared of feathers, by often thrusting the bill into the ground in search of the erucæ of the Dor-beetle*; the rook then, instead of being proscribed, should be treated as the farmer's friend; as it clears his ground from caterpillars, that do incredible damage by eating the roots of the corn.
  2. A cheat or swindler; someone who betrays.
    • 7 April 1705, William Wycherley, Letter to Alexander Pope in The Works of Alexander Pope 36:
      So I am (like an old rook, who is ruined by gaming) forced to live on the good fortune of the pushing young men, whose fancies are so vigorous that they ensure their success in their adventures with Muses, by their strength and imagination.
  3. (Britain) A type of firecracker used by farmers to scare birds of the same name.
  4. A trick-taking game, usually played with a specialized deck of cards.
    • 2007, Malcolm Bull and Keith Lockhart, Seeking a Sanctuary: Seventh-day Adventism and the American Dream, 174:
      Adventists still do not really know how to play cards, apart from the sanitized version of bridge, Rook.
  5. A bad deal, a rip-off.
Synonyms[edit]
Hypernyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

rook (third-person singular simple present rooks, present participle rooking, simple past and past participle rooked)

  1. (transitive) To cheat or swindle.
    • 1974, GB Edwards, The Book of Ebenezer Le Page, New York 2007, p. 311:
      Some had spent a week in Jersey before coming to Guernsey; and, from what Paddy had heard, they really do know how to rook the visitors over there.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

A rook (chess)

From Middle English rook, roke, rok, from Old French roc, ultimately from Persian رخ(rox), from Middle Persian lhw' (rox, rook, castle (chess)), possibly from Sanskrit रथ (ratha, chariot). Compare roc.

Noun[edit]

rook (plural rooks)

  1. (chess) A piece shaped like a castle tower, that can be moved only up, down, left or right (but not diagonally) or in castling.
  2. (rare) A castle or other fortification.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.
See also[edit]
Chess pieces in English · chess pieces, chessmen (see also: chess) (layout · text)
♚ ♛ ♜ ♝ ♞ ♟
king queen castle, rook bishop knight pawn

Etymology 3[edit]

From rookie.

Noun[edit]

rook (plural rooks)

  1. (baseball, slang) A rookie.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English roke, rock, rok (mist; vapour; drizzle; smoke; fumes), from Old Norse *rauk, related to Icelandic rok, roka (whirlwind; seafoam; seaspray), Middle Dutch rooc, rok, Modern Dutch rook (smoke; fog).

Noun[edit]

rook (uncountable)

  1. mist; fog; roke

Etymology 5[edit]

Verb[edit]

rook (third-person singular simple present rooks, present participle rooking, simple past and past participle rooked)

  1. (obsolete) To squat; to ruck.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Etymology 6[edit]

Verb[edit]

rook (third-person singular simple present rooks, present participle rooking, simple past and past participle rooked)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of look.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rook” in John Walker, A Critical Pronouncing Dictionary [] , London: Sold by G. G. J. and J. Robinſon, Paternoſter Row; and T. Cadell, in the Strand, 1791, →OCLC, page 439, column 3.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch rook (smoke), from Middle Dutch rôoc, from Old Dutch *rōk, from Proto-Germanic *raukiz.

Noun[edit]

rook (uncountable)

  1. smoke
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch roken (to smoke).

Verb[edit]

rook (present rook, present participle rokende, past participle gerook)

  1. (intransitive, transitive) to smoke (a tobacco product or surrogate)

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch rôoc, from Old Dutch *rōk, from Proto-Germanic *raukiz.

Noun[edit]

rook m (uncountable)

  1. smoke
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: rook

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

rook

  1. first-person singular present indicative of roken
  2. imperative of roken

Verb[edit]

rook

  1. singular past indicative of ruiken
  2. singular past indicative of rieken

Anagrams[edit]