rook

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See also: Rook and röök

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A rook (bird)

From Middle English rok, roke, from Old English hrōc, from Proto-Germanic *hrōkaz (compare Saterland Frisian Rouk, Dutch roek, obsolete German Ruch), from Proto-Indo-European *kerk- (crow, raven) (compare Old Irish cerc (hen), Old Prussian kerko (loon, diver), dialectal Bulgarian кро́кон (krókon, raven), Ancient Greek κόραξ (kórax, falcon), Old Armenian ագռաւ (agṙaw), Avestan 𐬐𐬀𐬵𐬭𐬐𐬀𐬙𐬀𐬝 (kahrkatat̰, rooster), Sanskrit कृकर (kṛkara, rooster)), Ukrainian крук (kruk, raven).

Noun[edit]

rook (plural rooks)

  1. A European bird, Corvus frugilegus, of the crow family.
    • Pennant
      The rook [] should be treated as the farmer's friend.
  2. A cheat or swindler; someone who betrays.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wycherley to this entry?)
  3. (Britain) a type of firecracker used by farmers to scare birds of the same name.
  4. A trick-taking game, usually played with a specialized deck of cards.
Synonyms[edit]
Hypernyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

rook (third-person singular simple present rooks, present participle rooking, simple past and past participle rooked)

  1. (transitive) To cheat or swindle.
    • 1974, GB Edwards, The Book of Ebenezer Le Page, New York 2007, p. 311:
      Some had spent a week in Jersey before coming to Guernsey; and, from what Paddy had heard, they really do know how to rook the visitors over there.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

A rook (chess)

From Middle English rook, roke, rok, from Old French roc, ultimately from Persian رخ (rox), from Middle Persian lhw' (rox, rook, castle (chess)), possibly from Sanskrit रथ (ratha, chariot). Compare roc.

Noun[edit]

rook (plural rooks)

  1. (chess) A piece shaped like a castle tower, that can be moved only up, down, left or right (but not diagonally) or in castling.
  2. (rare) A castle or other fortification.
Synonyms[edit]
See also[edit]
Chess pieces in English · chess pieces, chessmen (see also: chess) (layout · text)
♚ ♛ ♜ ♝ ♞ ♟
king queen castle, rook bishop knight pawn
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 3[edit]

From rookie.

Noun[edit]

rook (plural rooks)

  1. (baseball, slang) A rookie.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English roke, rock, rok (mist; vapour; drizzle; smoke; fumes), from Old Norse *rauk, related to Icelandic rok, roka (whirlwind; seafoam; seaspray), Middle Dutch rooc, rok, Modern Dutch rook (smoke; fog).

Noun[edit]

rook (uncountable)

  1. mist; fog; roke

Etymology 5[edit]

Verb[edit]

rook (third-person singular simple present rooks, present participle rooking, simple past and past participle rooked)

  1. (obsolete) To squat; to ruck.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Etymology 6[edit]

Verb[edit]

rook (third-person singular simple present rooks, present participle rooking, simple past and past participle rooked)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of look.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch rooc, from Old Dutch *rōk, rouc, from Proto-Germanic *raukiz.

Noun[edit]

rook m (uncountable)

  1. smoke
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Non-lemma forms.

Verb[edit]

rook

  1. first-person singular present indicative of roken
  2. imperative of roken

Verb[edit]

rook

  1. singular past indicative of ruiken
  2. singular past indicative of rieken

Anagrams[edit]