rouge

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See also: Rouge

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French rouge, from Latin rubeus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɹuːʒ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːʒ

Adjective[edit]

rouge (comparative more rouge, superlative most rouge)

  1. Of a reddish pink colour.

Noun[edit]

rouge (countable and uncountable, plural rouges)

  1. Red or pink makeup to add colour to the cheeks; blusher.
    • 1956, Delano Ames, chapter 4, in Crime out of Mind[1]:
      Before we could embark on the details of his mother's health we were joined by a fair, plump woman of indefinite age, who had once been—and at moments still was—very pretty. She wore a simple black silk dress, perhaps in deference to Tilly's death, though the note of mourning was jarred by flamboyant aquamarine ear-rings and too much rouge.
  2. Any reddish pink colour.
  3. (Canadian football) A single point awarded when a team kicks the ball out of its opponent's end zone, or when a kicked ball becomes dead within the non-kicking team's end zone. Etymology uncertain; it is thought that in the early years of the sport, a red flag indicated that a single had been scored. (This scoring term is not often used in Canada, with the term single being more commonly used.)
  4. (obsolete) In the Eton wall game, a scrummage, melée.
    • 1832 November 19, “On Eton Games, Continued”, in Eton College Magazine[2], number viii, page 284:
      [A] wall [...] against which all those formidable "rouges" (as they are most underivably called) take place; in which above twenty players contend, kicking each others' shins nearly as often as the ball
  5. In the Eton College field game, a scoring move accomplished by touching the ball down behind the opponents' goal-line (somewhat similar to the try in rugby). Originally, the player who scored the rouge had a chance to kick a goal, and the rouge was used as a tie-breaker if an equal number of goals was scored by each side. In the contemporary Eton College field game, a five-point score is awarded for kicking the ball so that it deflects off one of the opposing players and goes beyond the opposition's end of the pitch, and then touching the ball.
    • 1840 November 29, Pepys, C., “[Letter to the editor]”, in Bell's Life in London[3], page 4:
      The 7 got 1 "gaol" and 1 "ruge"; the 11 got 1 "gaol" and 4 "ruges"
    • 1847, Tremayne, H.H.; Thompson, A.R., Field Game Rules[4]:
      A rouge is obtained by touching the ball first, after it has been kicked behind
  6. (obsolete) From 1862 to 1868, a similar scoring move in Sheffield rules football. From 1862 to 1867, accomplished by touching the ball down after it had been kicked between two "rouge flags" either side of the goal. From 1867-1868, awarded for kicking the ball between the rouge flags and under the crossbar.
    • 1862, Laws of the Sheffield Foot-Ball Club[5]:
      A rouge is obtained by the player who first touches the ball after it has been kicked between the rouge flags
  7. (chemistry, archaic) A red amorphous powder consisting of ferric oxide, used in polishing and as a cosmetic; crocus; jeweller's rouge.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

rouge (third-person singular simple present rouges, present participle rouging, simple past and past participle rouged)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To apply rouge (makeup).
    She rouged her face before setting out for the party.
    • 1853, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, ch 13:
      She was a lady of about fifty, I should think, youthfully dressed, and of a very fine complexion. If I add to the little list of her accomplishments that she rouged a little, I do not mean that there was any harm in it.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French rouge, from Old French roge, rouge, from Latin rubeus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rouge (plural rouges)

  1. red (of a red color)
    Le sang est rouge. - Blood is red.
  2. red (left-wing, socialist)
    L'armée rouge. - Red Army.

Noun[edit]

rouge m (plural rouges)

  1. red

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: rouge
  • Japanese: ルージュ
  • Serbo-Croatian: ruž

See also[edit]

Colors in French · couleurs (layout · text)
     blanc      gris      noir
             rouge; cramoisi              orange; brun              jaune; crème
             vert citron              vert              menthe
             cyan; bleu canard              azur              bleu
             violet; indigo              magenta; pourpre              rose

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French roge, rouge, from Latin rubeus.

Noun[edit]

rouge m (uncountable)

  1. red

Adjective[edit]

rouge m or f (plural rouges)

  1. red

Descendants[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French rouge (red). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rewdʰ- (red). Doublet of raud.

Noun[edit]

rouge m (definite singular rougen, indefinite plural rougar, definite plural rougane)

  1. (cosmetics) red makeup (for the cheeks)

References[edit]