sad

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See also: SAD, säd, sąd, sáð, and сад

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English sad, from Old English sæd (sated, full), from Proto-Germanic *sadaz (sated, satisfied), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂- (to satiate, satisfy).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sæd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æd

Adjective[edit]

sad (comparative sadder or more sad, superlative saddest or most sad)

  1. (heading) Emotionally negative.
    1. Feeling sorrow; sorrowful, mournful.
      She gets sad when he's away.
    2. Appearing sorrowful.
      The puppy had a sad little face.
    3. Causing sorrow; lamentable.
      It's a sad fact that most rapes go unreported.
      • 1911, G. K. Chesterton, The Ballad of the White Horse
        The Great Gaels of Ireland are the men that God made mad, / For all their wars are merry and all their songs are sad.
      • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Eye Witness”, in The China Governess: A Mystery, London: Chatto & Windus, OCLC 483591931, page 249:
        The story struck the depressingly familiar note with which true stories ring in the tried ears of experienced policemen. No one queried it. It was in the classic pattern of human weakness, mean and embarrassing and sad.
    4. Poor in quality, bad; shameful, deplorable; later, regrettable, poor.
      That's the saddest-looking pickup truck I've ever seen.
    5. Of colours: dark, deep; later, sombre, dull.
      • 1650, Thomas Browne, “Compendiously of Sundry Other Common Tenents, Concerning Minerall and Terreous Bodies, Which Examined, Prove Either False or Dubious”, in Pseudodoxia Epidemica: [], 2nd edition, London: [] A. Miller, for Edw[ard] Dod and Nath[aniel] Ekins, [], OCLC 152706203, 2nd book, page 69:
        [] this is either uſed crude, and called ſulphur vive, and is of a ſadder colour; or after depuration, ſuch as we have in magdeleons or rols of a lighter yellow.
      • 1679, Izaak Walton, The Life of Bishop Robert Sanderson
        sad-coloured clothes
      • 1707, J[ohn] Mortimer, The Whole Art of Husbandry; or, The Way of Managing and Improving of Land. [], 2nd edition, London: [] J[ohn] H[umphreys] for H[enry] Mortlock [], and J[onathan] Robinson [], published 1708, OCLC 13320837:
        Woad, or wade, is used by the dyers to lay the foundation of many colours, especially all sad colours.
  2. (obsolete) Sated, having had one's fill; satisfied, weary.
  3. (obsolete) Steadfast, valiant.
  4. (obsolete) Dignified, serious, grave.
  5. (obsolete) Naughty; troublesome; wicked.
    • 1859, Ferna Vale, Natalie; or, A Gem Among the Sea-Weeds:
      Mr. Santon laughed, and merely said,—"Oh, you cruel beauty!" returning to his paper again; but, seated in the bay-window was one, who could not thus lightly look upon the conduct of the coquettish Winnie, for it was evident she was a sad coquette.
    • 1860, Isaac Taylor, Ultimate Civilization
      Sad tipsy fellows, both of them.
  6. (slang) Unfashionable; socially inadequate or undesirable.
    I can't believe you use drugs; you're so sad!
  7. (dialect) Soggy (to refer to pastries).
  8. (obsolete) Heavy; weighty; ponderous; close; hard.
    sad bread
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
Further reading[edit]

Verb[edit]

sad (third-person singular simple present sads, present participle sadding, simple past and past participle sadded)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To make melancholy; to sadden or grieve (someone).
    • 16??, John Webster, Appius and Virginia
      My father's wondrous pensive, and withal / With a suppress'd rage left his house displeas'd, / And so in post is hurried to the camp: / It sads me much; to expel which melancholy, / I have sent for company.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

sad (plural sads)

  1. Alternative form of saad (Arabic letter)

Anagrams[edit]


Cebuano[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: sad

Adverb[edit]

sad

  1. (focus) also; too
  2. (after a negative) either

Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sadъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sad m

  1. orchard

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • sad in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • sad in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

sad

  1. past tense of sidde

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sad

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌰𐌳

Livonian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *sadek.

Noun[edit]

sad

  1. precipitation (hail, rain, snow)

Lower Sorbian[edit]

sad

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sadъ (plant, garden). Cognate with Upper Sorbian sad, Polish sad (orchard), Czech sad (orchard), Russian сад (sad, orchard, garden), Old Church Slavonic садъ (sadŭ, plant, garden).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sad m

  1. fruit (food)

Declension[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *sadaz, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂- (to satiate, satisfy).

Adjective[edit]

sad (comparative sadoro, superlative sadost)

  1. full, sated, satiated
  2. weary

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German sat

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sadъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sad m inan (diminutive sadek)

  1. orchard

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • sad in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • sad in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English sæd.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sad (comparative sadder, superlative saddest)

  1. grave, serious
  2. strange, remarkable
  3. sad

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sьda, *sьgoda.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sȁd (Cyrillic spelling са̏д)

  1. now
  2. currently
  3. presently

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *saditi (to plant). Compare Serbo-Croatian saditi and Russian сад (sad)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sȃd m (Cyrillic spelling са̑д)

  1. plant nursery, plantation, orchard (specialized facility rather than a home garden)
  2. a seeding or sapling from a plant nursery
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • sad” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • sad” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sadъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sad m (genitive singular sadu, nominative plural sady, genitive plural sadov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. garden, orchard, plantation

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • sad in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Slovene[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sȃd m inan

  1. fruit

Inflection[edit]

Masculine inan., hard o-stem, mobile accent, plural in -ôv-
nom. sing. sád
gen. sing. sadú
singular dual plural
nominative sád sadôva sadôvi
accusative sád sadôva sadôve
genitive sadú sadôv sadôv
dative sádu sadôvoma sadôvom
locative sádu sadôvih sadôvih
instrumental sádom sadôvoma sadôvi
Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. sád
gen. sing. sáda
singular dual plural
nominative sád sáda sádi
accusative sád sáda sáde
genitive sáda sádov sádov
dative sádu sádoma sádom
locative sádu sádih sádih
instrumental sádom sádoma sádi

Further reading[edit]

  • sad”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Wakhi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Tajik сад (sad).

Numeral[edit]

sad

  1. hundred