sear

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English seer, seere, from Old English sēar, sīere ‎(dry, sere, sear, withered, barren), from Proto-Germanic *sauzaz ‎(dry), from Proto-Indo-European *saus-, *sus- ‎(dry, parched). Cognate with Dutch zoor ‎(dry, rough), Low German soor ‎(dry), German sohr ‎(parched, dried up), Norwegian dialectal søyr ‎(the desiccation and death of a tree), Lithuanian sausas ‎(dry).

Adjective[edit]

sear ‎(comparative searer or more sear, superlative searest or most sear)

  1. Dry; withered, especially of vegetation.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English seeren, seren, from Old English sēarian ‎(to become sere, to grow sear, wither, pine away), from Proto-Germanic *sauzōną, *sauzijaną ‎(to become dry). Related to Old High German sōrēn ‎(to wither, wilt), Greek hauos ("dry"), Sanskrit sōsa ("drought"). The use in firearms terminology may relate to French serrer ("to grip").

Verb[edit]

sear ‎(third-person singular simple present sears, present participle searing, simple past and past participle seared)

  1. To char, scorch, or burn the surface of something with a hot instrument.
  2. To wither; to dry up.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  3. (figuratively) To mark permanently, as if by burning.
    The events of that day were seared into her memory.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

sear ‎(plural sears)

  1. A scar produced by searing
  2. Part of a gun that retards the hammer until the trigger is pulled.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

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Adjective[edit]

sear

  1. eastern, east

Synonyms[edit]

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West Frisian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sear (seare)

  1. painful