serpent

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Serpent and sèrpent

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French serpent (snake, serpent), from Latin serpēns (snake), from the verb serpō (I creep, crawl), from Proto-Indo-European *serp-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

serpent (plural serpents)

  1. A snake.
  2. (music) An obsolete wind instrument in the brass family, whose shape is suggestive of a snake (Wikipedia article).
  3. (figuratively) A subtle, treacherous, malicious person.
  4. A kind of firework with a serpentine motion.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

serpent (third-person singular simple present serpents, present participle serpenting, simple past and past participle serpented)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To wind or meander
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To encircle.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Evelyn to this entry?)

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin serpēns, serpentem, from serpō (crawl, creep), from Proto-Indo-European *serp-.

Noun[edit]

serpent m, f (plural serpents)

  1. snake

Synonyms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French serpent (snake, serpent), from Latin serpēns (snake), from the verb serpō (I creep, crawl), from Proto-Indo-European *serp-.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ser‧pent
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun[edit]

serpent n, f, m (plural serpenten, diminutive serpentje n)

  1. (archaic) snake n
  2. an unpleasant, spiteful person n
  3. (music) serpent f

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French serpent, from Old French serpent, from Latin serpentem, accusative form of serpēns, from serpō (crawl, creep), from Proto-Indo-European *serp-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

serpent m (plural serpents)

  1. snake

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

serpent

  1. third-person plural future active indicative of serpō

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French serpent, from Latin serpentem, accusative singular form of serpēns.

Noun[edit]

serpent m (plural serpenz)

  1. snake

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin serpēns, serpentem.

Noun[edit]

serpent m (oblique plural serpenz or serpentz, nominative singular serpenz or serpentz, nominative plural serpent)

  1. snake

Descendants[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin serpēns, serpentem.

Noun[edit]

serpent m (plural serpents)

  1. (Surmiran) snake

Synonyms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) serp
  • (Sursilvan) siarp
  • (Sutsilvan) zearp
  • (Surmiran) zerp