simile

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See also: símile

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology[edit]

From Latin simile ("comparison, likeness", "parallel") (first attested 1393), originally from simile the neuter form of similis ("like, similar, resembling"). Confer the English similar.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɪməli/
  • (file)
Examples (figure of speech)

Her eyes were like stars.

Noun[edit]

simile (countable and uncountable, plural similes or similia)

  1. A figure of speech in which one thing is compared to another, in the case of English generally using like or as.
    A simile is a bit like a metaphor.
    • 1826, Thomas Bayly Howell, A Complete Collection of State Trials and Proceedings for High Treason and Other Crimes and Misdemeanours (volume 33)
      He made a simile of George the third to Nebuchadnezzar, and of the prince regent to Belshazzar, and insisted that the prince represented the latter in not paying much attention to what had happened to kings []
    • 1925, Countee Cullen, Fruit of the Flower
      My father is a quiet man / With sober, steady ways; / For simile, a folded fan; / His nights are like his days.

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Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

simile

  1. similarly

Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

simile (comparative plus simile, superlative le plus simile)

  1. similar

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin similis.

Adjective[edit]

simile (masculine and feminine plural simili)

  1. similar
    • Non è molto simile. It is not very similar.
  2. such
    • È possibile una cosa simile? Is such a thing possible?

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Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

simile

  1. nominative neuter singular of similis
  2. accusative neuter singular of similis
  3. vocative neuter singular of similis

References[edit]

  • simile in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers