soken

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See also: sōken

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sookne, socne (district held by a socage) (> Medieval Latin sōca (right of jurisdiction), see soke), from Old English sōcn (jurisdiction, prosecution, soke, literally act of seeking), from Proto-Germanic *sōkniz (seeking, inquiry), from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ- (to follow, track). Akin to Gothic 𐍃𐍉𐌺𐌽𐍃 (sōkns, controversy), Old English sacu (legal case, dispute), sēcan (to seek), Swedish socken (parish), Danish sogn (parish), Norwegian sokn (parish). More at sake, seek, soke.

Noun[edit]

soken (countable and uncountable, plural sokens)

  1. (historical) The ancient right (usually conferred by royalty) to hold a local court of justice and levy specific fees and fines.
    1. The 'resort' (right) of specific farmers to have their grain ground at a specific mill or, inversely, the right of a mill to that custom.
    2. A right of prosecution and judgement.
  2. (historical) The area over which this right was established.
    Synonym: soke
  3. (obsolete) A place that is regularly frequented.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Webster's Dictionary
  • Oxford English Dictionary
  • Stow's Survey of London

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

soken

  1. Alternative form of souken

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English stocking.

Noun[edit]

soken

  1. stocking