soso

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Aklanon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *susu.

Noun[edit]

soso

  1. (anatomy) breast

Bambara[edit]

Noun[edit]

soso

  1. mosquito

Buhi'non Bikol[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *susu.

Noun[edit]

soso

  1. (anatomy) breast

Eastern Bontoc[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *susu.

Noun[edit]

soso

  1. (anatomy) breast

Hausa[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sòː.sóː/
    • (Standard Kano Hausa) IPA(key): [sòː.sóː]

Noun[edit]

sṑsō m (possessed form sṑson)

  1. loofah, sponge

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈso.zo/
  • Rhymes: -ozo
  • Hyphenation: só‧so

Adverb[edit]

soso

  1. (obsolete) Alternative form of suso

Further reading[edit]

  • soso in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams[edit]

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

soso

  1. Rōmaji transcription of そそ

Karao[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *susu.

Noun[edit]

soso

  1. (anatomy) breast

Maranao[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *susu.

Noun[edit]

soso

  1. (anatomy) breast

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin īnsulsus (literally unsalted).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsoso/ [ˈso.so]
  • Rhymes: -oso
  • Syllabification: so‧so

Adjective[edit]

soso (feminine sosa, masculine plural sosos, feminine plural sosas)

  1. dull (not exciting)
    Synonyms: aburrido, fome
    • 2021 January 2, Claudi Pérez, “Salvador Illa: el triunfo de la sobriedad”, in El País[1]:
      En una de las calles principales, que se adentra en la localidad como un río ancho y oscuro, tras dejar atrás una iglesia austera aparecen algunos comercios, una tienda de cachivaches, muy pocos jóvenes: un pueblo soso o sobrio o sereno, como el ministro, al lado de una zona boscosa ideal para dar un paseo, para buscar setas, para pensar un poco.
      In one of the main streets that flows into the place like a dark, wide river, past an austere church appear some shops, a junk shop, very few young people: a dull village, or a sober one, or serene, just like the minister, next to a woodland ideal for a walk, to find mushrooms, to think for a bit.
  2. bland, tasteless (lacking taste)
    Synonyms: insípido, desabrido

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

soso m (plural sosos)

  1. blandness
    Synonym: insipidez
    • 2021 January 2, Claudi Pérez, “Salvador Illa: el triunfo de la sobriedad”, in El País[2]:
      Es el triunfo —amargo triunfo— del soso, de un tipo que ha sabido surfear una ola salvaje sin que le devore.
      It is the triumph—the bitter triumph—of a type of blandness which has managed to surf a wild wave without getting swallowed by it.

Further reading[edit]

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly from Igbo sọ̀ọsọ̀ and Yoruba ṣooṣo.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: so‧so

Adjective[edit]

soso

  1. empty, hollow, inconsequential
  2. pure, mere, sheer, only
  3. (finance) free (no costs)
  4. naked, bared, dehusked

Adverb[edit]

soso

  1. in vain, for nothing
  2. only, just, nothing more, purely
    • 1783, C. L. Schumann, Neger-Englisches Worterbuch [Negro English Dictionary]‎[3]:
      Kuljara va ju no habi bunne hudu, da buba soso
      Your canoe doesn't have proper wood, it's just sapwood.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Norval Smith (2015), “Ingredient X: the shared African lexical element in the English-lexifier Atlantic Creoles, and the theory of rapid creolization”, in P. Muysken, N. Smith, editors, Surviving the Middle Passage: The West Africa-Surinam Sprachbund, Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton, →ISBN, page 72

Ternate[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

soso

  1. to wash one's rear

Conjugation[edit]

Conjugation of soso
Singular Plural
Inclusive Exclusive
1st tososo fososo misoso
2nd nososo nisoso
3rd Masculine ososo isoso, yososo
Feminine mososo
Neuter isoso
- archaic

References[edit]

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh