sparse

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin sparsus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /spɑːs/
  • (US) IPA(key): /spɑːɹs/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

sparse (comparative sparser, superlative sparsest)

  1. Having widely spaced intervals.
    a sparse array, index, or matrix
    • 2019 October, Tony Miles and Philip Sherratt, “EMR kicks off new era”, in Modern Railways, page 58:
      The Leicester to Grimsby service will become hourly throughout (with some extensions to Cleethorpes as at present), while a new hourly Peterborough to Doncaster service via Spalding, Sleaford and Lincoln will join up two routes with a sparse service at present.
  2. Not dense; meager; scanty
  3. (mathematics) Having few nonzero elements

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

sparse (third-person singular simple present sparses, present participle sparsing, simple past and past participle sparsed)

  1. (obsolete) To disperse, to scatter.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:disperse
    • 1536, [Richard Morison], A Remedy for Sedition, London: [] Thomae Bertheleti [], OCLC 216192236, signature F. i.:
      They began properly to ſparſe pretye rumours in the North, that no man ſhulde eate whyte breade, no man eate pygge, gooſe, or capon, without he agreed before with the kynge.

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

sparse

  1. third-person singular past historic of spargere
  2. third-person singular past historic of sparere

Participle[edit]

sparse f

  1. feminine plural of sparso

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

sparse

  1. vocative masculine singular of sparsus

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sparse

  1. third-person singular simple perfect indicative of sparge