spectacle

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English spectacle, from Middle French spectacle, from Latin spectāculum (a show, spectacle), from spectō (to see, behold), frequentative of speciō (to see). See species. Doublet of spectaculum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈspɛktəkl̩/
  • Hyphenation: spec‧ta‧cle
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

spectacle (plural spectacles)

  1. An exciting or extraordinary scene, exhibition, performance etc.
    The horse race was a thrilling spectacle.
    • 1591 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The First Part of Henry the Sixt”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act I, scene vi], page 100, column 1:
      VVith ſcoffs and ſcornes, and contumelious taunts, / In open Market-place produc't they me, / To be a publique ſpectacle to all: / Here, ſayd they, is the Terror of the French, / The Scar-Crovv that affrights our Children ſo.
    • 22 March 2012, Scott Tobias, AV Club The Hunger Games[1]
      In movie terms, it suggests Paul Verhoeven in Robocop/Starship Troopers mode, an R-rated bloodbath where the grim spectacle of children murdering each other on television is bread-and-circuses for the age of reality TV, enforced by a totalitarian regime to keep the masses at bay.
  2. An embarrassing or unedifying scene or situation.
    He made a spectacle out of himself.
  3. (usually in the plural) glasses (instrument used to assist vision)
  4. The brille of a snake.
  5. (rail transport) A frame with different coloured lenses on a semaphore signal through which light from a lamp shines at night, often a part of the signal arm.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further reading[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin spectaculum, from spectare (to look).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /spɛk.takl/
  • Hyphenation: spec‧ta‧cle
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

spectacle m (plural spectacles)

  1. a show, a spectacle, a performance, a concert
    Ils ont estimé qu’il est divertissant et qu’il se démarque nettement du spectacle actuel.
    They thought it was entertaining and that there was a clear difference between it and the current show.
  2. a sight, a showing, a display
    Devant un tel spectacle ils se jetèrent à genoux pleurant les morts de leurs compatriotes.
    They went down on their knees crying for the deaths of their fellow countrymen at this atrocious sight.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Czech: spektákl
  • Polish: spektakl

Further reading[edit]

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

spectacle

  1. something that helps understanding