sty

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See also: stý

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English sty, from Old English stī, stiġ (sty, pen, a wooden enclosure; hall, chiefly in compounds), from Proto-Germanic *stiją. Cognate with German Steige (hen-coop), Danish sti (enclosure for swine, sheep, hens, etc.), Swedish stia (sty for pigs, geese, etc.), Norwegian sti (flock of sheep), Icelandic stía (a kennel).

Noun[edit]

sty (plural sties)

  1. A pen or enclosure for swine.
  2. (figuratively) A messy, dirty or debauched place.
    • Milton
      To roll with pleasure in a sensual sty.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sty (third-person singular simple present sties, present participle stying, simple past and past participle stied)

  1. To place in, or as if in, a sty
    • William Shakespeare, The Tempest Act I, Scene II
      and here you sty me
      In this hard rock, whiles you do keep from me
      The rest o' the island
  2. To live in a sty, or any messy or dirty place

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English stien, stiȝen, from Old English stīġan (to go; ascend, mount), from Proto-Germanic *stīganą, from Proto-Indo-European *steygʰ-. Cognate with Dutch stijgen, German steigen, Norwegian Bokmål stige, Norwegian Nynorsk and Swedish stiga, Old Norse stíga.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

sty (third-person singular simple present sties, present participle stying, simple past and past participle stied)

  1. (obsolete) To ascend, rise up, climb. [9th-17th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.xi:
      The beast impatient of his smarting wound, / And of so fierce and forcible despight, / Thought with his wings to stye aboue the ground [...].
    • Spenser (1590)
      From this lower tract he dared to sty up to the clouds.
    • Mountagu Diatribe (1621)
      Led along, as some Creatures are, by the Noses, and voluntarily hood-winked; or like seeled Doves, sty up, you know not whither, nor how far.
    • Benlowes (1652)
      That she might sty to the seat of Beatifick Mirth.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

sty (plural sties)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) A ladder.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Probably a back-formation from styany, mistaken for "sty-on-eye" but correctly from Middle English styany, composed of styan ("sty"; from Old English stīġende, present participle of stīgan (to rise)) + y (eye).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

sty (plural sties)

  1. (medicine) An inflammation of the eyelid.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English stiġ, stī, from Proto-Germanic *stiją.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sty (plural styes)

  1. A pigsty (pen or set of pens for pigs)
  2. (rare) Any other crude dwelling or abode.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English stīġ, from Proto-Germanic *stīgō.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sty (plural styes or stiȝen)

  1. A path, track or street.
  2. (figuratively) One's chosen pathway or choices in life.
  3. (figuratively, rare) A short narrative.
References[edit]