supersede

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French superseder (postpone, defer), from Latin supersedere, from super (over) + sedere (to sit). The meaning “to replace” is from 1642, probably by association with unrelated precede – note that ‘c’ instead of ‘s’ (from cedere (to go), not sedere (to sit)). As a result, supercede is a common misspelling – see therein for further discussion.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

supersede (third-person singular simple present supersedes, present participle superseding, simple past and past participle superseded)

  1. (transitive) Set (something) aside.
  2. (transitive) Take the place of.
    No one could supersede his sister.
  3. (transitive) Displace in favour of another.
    Modern US culture has superseded the native forms.

Usage notes[edit]

Supersede is the only English word ending in sede. Similar words include four ending in ceed, and several ending in cede (apart from seed). Because of this, supercede is a common misspelling of this word.

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

supersede (plural supersedes)

  1. (Internet) An updated newsgroup post that supersedes an earlier version.
    Rogue cancels and supersedes are being issued on a large scale against posters.

References[edit]

  1. ^ supersede in thefreedictionary.com, Copyright © 2010 Farlex, Inc.

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

supersedē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of supersedeō