system

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See also: System and systém

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From late Latin systēma, from Ancient Greek σύστημα (sústēma, organised whole, body), from σύν (sún, with, together) + ἵστημι (hístēmi, I stand).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɪstəm/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: sys‧tem

Noun[edit]

system (plural systems)

  1. A collection of organized things; a whole composed of relationships among its members.
    There are eight planets in the solar system.
    • 2013 May–June, Charles T. Ambrose, “Alzheimer’s Disease”, in American Scientist[1], volume 101, number 3, page 200:
      Similar studies of rats have employed four different intracranial resorbable, slow sustained release systems—surgical foam, a thermal gel depot, a microcapsule or biodegradable polymer beads.
    1. (mathematics) A set of equations involving the same variables, which are to be solved simultaneously.
    2. (medicine) The body organs that contribute to a vegetative function.
    3. (music) A set of staffs that indicate instruments or sounds that are to be played simultaneously.
    4. (computing) The set of hardware and software operating in a computer.
  2. A method or way of organizing or planning.
    Many people believed communism was a good system until the breakup of the Soviet Union.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
      But so matters fell out, and so I must relate them; and if any reader is shocked at their appearing unnatural, I cannot help it. I must remind such persons that I am not writing a system, but a history, and I am not obliged to reconcile every matter to the received notions concerning truth and nature.
    • 1915, George A. Birmingham, “chapter I”, in Gossamer (Project Gutenberg; EBook #24394), London: Methuen & Co., published 8 January 2013 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 558189256:
      As a political system democracy seems to me extraordinarily foolish, but I would not go out of my way to protest against it. My servant is, so far as I am concerned, welcome to as many votes as he can get. I would very gladly make mine over to him if I could.
    • 2012 March–April, John T. Jost, “Social justice: Is it in our nature (and our future)?”, in American Scientist[2], volume 100, number 2, page 162:
      He draws eclectically on studies of baboons, descriptive anthropological accounts of hunter-gatherer societies and, in a few cases, the fossil record. With this biological framework in place, Corning endeavors to show that the capitalist system as currently practiced in the United States and elsewhere is manifestly unfair.
  3. (derogatory, with "the") The mainstream culture, controlled by the elites or government of a state, or a combination of them, seen as oppressive to the individual.
    • 1986, Madonna; Stephen Bray; Patrick Leonard (lyrics and music), “Where's the Party”, in True Blue, performed by Madonna:
      Don't want to grow old too fast / Don't want to let the system get me down / I've got to find a way to make the good times last / And if you'll show me how, I'm ready now

Usage notes[edit]

In attributive use, especially relating to computer systems, the plural is more common than the singular; one normally speaks of a systems engineer and not a system engineer.

Synonyms[edit]

The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. Use the templates {{syn|en|...}} or {{ant|en|...}} to add them to the appropriate sense(s).

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Most common English words before 1923 in Project Gutenberg: sudden · usual · entirely · #725: system · sister · occasion · enemy

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From late Latin systēma, from Ancient Greek σύστημα (sústēma, organised whole, body), from σύν (sún, with, together) + ἵστημι (hístēmi, I stand).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /systeːm/, [syˈsd̥eːˀm]

Noun[edit]

system n (singular definite systemet, plural indefinite systemer)

  1. system

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English system

Noun[edit]

system m (plural systems)

  1. Word used in star system.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek σύστημα (sústēma)

Noun[edit]

system n (definite singular systemet, indefinite plural system or systemer, definite plural systema or systemene)

  1. a system

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek σύστημα (sústēma)

Noun[edit]

system n (definite singular systemet, indefinite plural system, definite plural systema)

  1. system

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

system m inan

  1. system

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • system in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

system n

  1. a system, a way or method of organizing items and knowledge
  2. a computer system (primarily its hardware)
  3. a system of restricted sales of alcohol, including state-owned monopoly shops

Declension[edit]

Declension of system 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative system systemet system systemen
Genitive systems systemets systems systemens

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]