talk through one's hat

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Attested from the late 19th century in the United States in the sense of “bluff”; the sense “speak without authority or knowledge” developed later. Although some people speculate a connection to a former requirement that British Members of Parliament wear hats, the connection is implausible.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Verb[edit]

talk through one's hat

  1. (idiomatic) To speak lacking expertise, authority, or knowledge; to invent or fabricate facts.
    • c. 1900, Gilbert Parker, "At The Sign Of The Eagle":
      "Mr. Pride said to me a moment ago that they spoke better English in Boston than any other place in the world."
      "Did he, though, Lady Lawless? That's good. Well, I guess he was only talking through his hat."
  2. (idiomatic) To assert something as true or valid; to bluff.
    • 1905, “The Norsk Nightingale”, in Popular Mechanics[1], page 478:
      No, sir, she yust standing pat, / And vonce more she tal her father, / “Yu ban talking tru yure hat!”
    • 1922, P. G. Wodehouse, chapter 14, in Right Ho, Jeeves:
      He's conceited and opinionative and argues all the time, even when he knows perfectly well that he's talking through his hat.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also[edit]

References[edit]