temperate

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin temperatus, past participle of temperare (moderate, forbear, combine properly). See temper. Displaced native Old English ġemetegod.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɛmpəɹət/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: temp‧pe‧rate

Adjective[edit]

temperate (comparative more temperate, superlative most temperate)

  1. Moderate; not excessive
    temperate heat
    a temperate climate.
  2. Moderate in the indulgence of the natural appetites or passions
    temperate in eating and drinking.
    • August 9, 1768, Benjamin Franklin, To John Alleyne, Esq. On Early Marriages
      Be sober and temperate, and you will be healthy.
    • 1915, G[eorge] A. Birmingham [pseudonym; James Owen Hannay], chapter I, in Gossamer, New York, N.Y.: George H. Doran Company, OCLC 5661828, pages 14–15:
      I am a temperate man and have made it a rule not to drink before luncheon. But I was so much ashamed of my first feeling about Gorman that I thought it well to break my rule. [] I gave my vote for whisky and soda as the more thorough-going drink of the two. A cocktail is seldom more than a mouthful.
  3. Proceeding from temperance.
    • 1733-1738, Alexander Pope, Imitations of Horace:
      The temperate sleeps, and spirits light as air.
  4. Living in an environment that is temperate, not extreme.
    temperate fishes

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • (geology) temperate zone, that part of the earth which lies between either tropic and the corresponding polar circle; -- so called because the heat is less than in the torrid zone, and the cold less than in the frigid zones.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

temperate (third-person singular simple present temperates, present participle temperating, simple past and past participle temperated)

  1. (obsolete) To render temperate; to moderate
    Synonyms: soften, temper
    • 1613, John Marston, The Insatiate Countess:
      It inflames temperance, and temp'rates wrath.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

temperate

  1. inflection of temperare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Etymology 2[edit]

Participle[edit]

temperate f pl

  1. feminine plural of temperato

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

temperāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of temperō

References[edit]