tendre

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See also: tendré

English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tendre (comparative more tendre, superlative most tendre)

  1. Obsolete form of tender.

Verb[edit]

tendre (third-person singular simple present tendres, present participle tendring, simple past and past participle tendred)

  1. Obsolete form of tender.

Noun[edit]

tendre (plural tendres)

  1. (archaic) Tender feeling or fondness; affection.
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, Chapter 15:
      You poor friendless creatures are always having some foolish tendre []
    • 1863, Sheridan Le Fanu, The House by the Churchyard
      So the athletic Magnolia instantly impounded the little lieutenant, and began to rally him, in the sort of slang she delighted in, with plenty of merriment and malice upon his tendre for Miss Chattesworth, and made the gallant young gentleman blush and occasionally smile, and bow a great deal, and take some snuff.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Occitan (compare Occitan tèndre), from Latin tenerum, accusative of tener (compare French tendre, Spanish tierno), from Proto-Indo-European *ten- (to stretch, draw).

Adjective[edit]

tendre (feminine tendra, masculine and feminine plural tendres)

  1. soft
  2. charming

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Occitan, from Latin teneō, tenere.

Verb[edit]

tendre

  1. (Alghero) Alternative form of tenir

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tɑ̃dʁ/
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French tendre, from Latin tenerum, accusative of tener, from Proto-Indo-European *ten- (to stretch, draw).

Adjective[edit]

tendre (plural tendres)

  1. tender (soft, delicate)

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French tendre, from Latin tendere, present active infinitive of tendō.

Verb[edit]

tendre

  1. (transitive) to tighten
  2. (transitive) to stretch out
  3. (intransitive, ~ vers) to tend (to infinity)
  4. (intransitive, ~ vers) to strive (for)
  5. (reflexive) to become taut
Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Old French tendre.

Adjective[edit]

tendre

  1. tender (soft, delicate)
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English tynder.

Noun[edit]

tendre

  1. Alternative form of tinder

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French tendre, from Latin tener, tenerum.

Adjective[edit]

tendre m or f

  1. (Jersey) tender

Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin tenerum, accusative of tener.

Adjective[edit]

tendre m (oblique and nominative feminine singular tendre)

  1. tender (soft, delicate)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin tendere, present active infinitive of tendō.

Verb[edit]

tendre

  1. (transitive) to stretch
Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants[edit]