the dogs bark, but the caravan goes on

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The saying, found in many Eurasian languages, probably originated in Turkish (Turkish it ürür, kervan yürür), suggested by the rhyming verbs ürür and yürür.

In Hungarian the saying (A kutya ugat, a karaván halad; “The dog barks, the caravan progresses”) is sometimes combined with another (Pénz beszél, a kutya ugat; “Money talks, the dog barks”) to become Pénz beszél, a kutya ugat, a karaván halad; “Money talks, the dog barks, the caravan progresses.”

Proverb[edit]

the dogs bark, but the caravan goes on

  1. History (or progress) moves ahead, no matter the criticism it may attract.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Gregory Y. Titelman: Random House Dictionary of Popular Proverbs and Sayings, 1996, page 57, →ISBN