thorp

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Thorp and þorp

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English thorp, throp, from Old English þorp, þrop (farm, village), from Proto-Germanic *þurpą, *þrepą (village, farmstead, troop), from Proto-Indo-European *trab-, *treb- (dwelling, room). Cognate with North Frisian torp, terp (village, fallow), Dutch dorp (village), German Dorf (hamlet, village, town), Danish torp (village), Swedish torp (farm, cottage, croft), Icelandic þorp (village, farm), Latin trabs (beam, rafter, roof), Lithuanian trobà (farmhouse), Welsh tref (town), Albanian trevë (country, region, village). Related to troop. Doublet of dorp.

Noun[edit]

thorp (plural thorps)

  1. (archaic, now chiefly in placenames) A group of houses standing together in the country; a hamlet; a village.
    • Fairfax
      Within a little thorp I staid.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Old English þorp, from Proto-Germanic *þurpą.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /θɔrp/, /θrɔp/, /θrɔːp/

Noun[edit]

thorp (plural thorpes)

  1. A small village or settlement.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *þurpą.

Noun[edit]

thorp n

  1. village

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • thorp”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *þurpą.

Noun[edit]

thorp n

  1. village

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: dorp
    • German: -trop
    • Low German: Dörp, Dorp, Derp (eastern or Prussian Low German), Duorp (Westphalian Low German: Münsterländisch), Duarp (Westphalian Low German: Sauerländisch), Doärp (Westphalian Low German: Paderbornisch; Plural: Döärper)
    • Plautdietsch: Darp
    • West Frisian: doarp (forming doublet with terp)