thorp

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See also: Thorp and þorp

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English thorp, throp, from Old English þorp, þrop (farm, village), from Proto-West Germanic *þorp, from Proto-Germanic *þurpą, *þrepą (village, farmstead, troop), from Proto-Indo-European *trab-, *treb- (dwelling, room). Doublet of dorf and dorp, and possibly also of troop and troupe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

thorp (plural thorps)

  1. (archaic, now chiefly in placenames) A group of houses standing together in the country; a hamlet; a village.

Alternative forms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Old English þorp

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /θɔrp/, /θrɔp/, /θrɔːp/

Noun[edit]

thorp (plural thorpes)

  1. A small village or settlement.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: thorp

References[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *þorp.

Noun[edit]

thorp n

  1. village

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • thorp”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *þorp.

Noun[edit]

thorp n

  1. village

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]