toll

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See also: Toll

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /təʊl/, /tɒl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /toʊɫ/, /tɔl/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /toʊl/, /tɑl/
  • Rhymes: -əʊl
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English toll, tol, tolle, from Old English toll (toll, duty, custom), from Proto-Germanic *tullō (what is counted or told), from Proto-Indo-European *dol- (calculation, fraud)[1]. Cognate with Saterland Frisian Tol (toll), Dutch tol (toll), German Zoll (toll, duty, customs), Danish told (toll, duty, tariff), Swedish tull (toll, customs), Icelandic tollur (toll, customs). More at tell, tale.

Alternate etymology derives Old English toll, from Medieval Latin tolōneum, tolōnium, alteration (due to the Germanic forms above) of Latin telōneum, from Ancient Greek τελώνιον (telṓnion, toll-house), from τέλος (télos, tax).

Noun[edit]

toll (plural tolls)

  1. Loss or damage incurred through a disaster.
    The war has taken its toll on the people.
  2. A fee paid for some liberty or privilege, particularly for the privilege of passing over a bridge or on a highway, or for that of vending goods in a fair, market, etc.
  3. (business) A fee for using any kind of material processing service.
    We can handle on a toll basis your needs for spray drying, repackaging, crushing and grinding, and dry blending.
  4. (US) A tollbooth.
    We will be replacing some manned tolls with high-speed device readers.
  5. (UK, law, obsolete) A liberty to buy and sell within the bounds of a manor.
  6. A portion of grain taken by a miller as a compensation for grinding.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

toll (third-person singular simple present tolls, present participle tolling, simple past and past participle tolled)

  1. (transitive) To impose a fee for the use of.
    Once more it is proposed to toll the East River bridges.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To levy a toll on (someone or something).
  3. (transitive) To take as a toll.
  4. To pay a toll or tallage.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitney, The Century dictionary and cyclopedia, toll.

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably the same as Etymology 3. Possibly related to or influenced by toil

Noun[edit]

toll (plural tolls)

  1. The act or sound of tolling
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

toll (third-person singular simple present tolls, present participle tolling, simple past and past participle tolled)

  1. (ergative) To ring (a bell) slowly and repeatedly.
    Martin tolled the great bell every day.
    Ask not for whom the bell tolls.
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[[Episode 12: The Cyclops]]”, in Ulysses, London: The Egoist Press, published October 1922, OCLC 2297483:
      From the belfries far and near the funereal deathbell tolled unceasingly while all around the gloomy precincts rolled the ominous warning of a hundred muffled drums punctuated by the hollow booming of pieces of ordnance.
  2. (transitive) To summon by ringing a bell.
    The ringer tolled the workers back from the fields for vespers.
    • 1697, “The Fourth Book of the Georgics”, in Virgil; John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      When hollow murmurs of their evening bells / Dismiss the sleepy swains, and toll them to their cells.
  3. (transitive) To announce by tolling.
    The bells tolled the King’s death.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English tolen, tollen, variation of tullen, tillen (to draw, allure, entice), from Old English *tyllan, *tillan (to pull, draw, attract) (found in compounds fortyllan (to seduce, lead astray, draw away from the mark, deceive) and betyllan, betillan (to lure, decoy)), related to Old Frisian tilla (to lift, raise), Dutch tillen (to lift, raise, weigh, buy), Low German tillen (to lift, remove), Swedish dialectal tille (to take up, appropriate).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

toll (third-person singular simple present tolls, present participle tolling, simple past and past participle tolled)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To draw; pull; tug; drag.
  2. (transitive) To tear in pieces.
  3. (transitive) To draw; entice; invite; allure.
    Hou many virgins shal she tolle and drawe to þe Lord - "Life of Our Lady"
  4. (transitive) To lure with bait; tole (especially, fish and animals).
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Latin tollō (to lift up).

Verb[edit]

toll (third-person singular simple present tolls, present participle tolling, simple past and past participle tolled)

  1. (law, obsolete) To take away; to vacate; to annul.
  2. (law) To suspend.
    The statute of limitations defense was tolled as a result of the defendant’s wrongful conduct.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Verb[edit]

toll

  1. (African-American Vernacular) simple past tense and past participle of tell
    I done toll you for the last time.

References[edit]

  • toll at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • toll” in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Proto-Celtic *tullom, *tullos (hole). (Compare Irish toll, Welsh twll, both meaning "hole".)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

toll m (plural tolls)

  1. pool, puddle

References[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German tol, from Old High German tol, from Proto-Germanic *dulaz (dazed, foolish, crazy, stupid).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

toll (strong nominative masculine singular toller, comparative toller, superlative am tollsten)

  1. (colloquial) great, nice, wonderful
    Synonyms: cool, geil
    ‚Katjuscha‘ ist ein tolles Lied.‘Katyusha’ is a great song.
  2. (dated) crazy, mad
    Synonym: verrückt
    • 1808, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, “Walpurgisnacht”, in Faust: Der Tragödie erster Teil [Faust, Part One]‎[1]:
      Laß uns aus dem Gedräng’ entweichen; / Es ist zu toll, sogar für meines gleichen.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1924, Thomas Mann, Der Zauberberg [The Magic Mountain], volume 1, Berlin: S. Fischer, page 141:
      Wie aus weiter Ferne hörte er Frau Stöhr etwas erzählen oder behaupten, was ihm als so tolles Zeug erschien, daß er in verwirrte Zweifel geriet, ob er noch richtig höre oder ob Frau Stöhrs Äußerungen sich vielleicht in seinem Kopfe zu Unsinn verwandelten.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • toll” in Duden online
  • toll” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Uralic *tulka (feather, wing).[1][2].

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

toll (plural tollak)

  1. feather (a branching, hair-like structure that grows on the bodies of birds, used for flight, swimming, protection and display)
  2. feather (a feather-like fin or wing on objects, such as an arrow)
  3. pen (a tool, originally made from a feather but now usually a small tubular instrument, containing ink used to write or make marks)
  4. (figuratively) pen (a writer, or his style)

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -a-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative toll tollak
accusative tollat tollakat
dative tollnak tollaknak
instrumental tollal tollakkal
causal-final tollért tollakért
translative tollá tollakká
terminative tollig tollakig
essive-formal tollként tollakként
essive-modal
inessive tollban tollakban
superessive tollon tollakon
adessive tollnál tollaknál
illative tollba tollakba
sublative tollra tollakra
allative tollhoz tollakhoz
elative tollból tollakból
delative tollról tollakról
ablative tolltól tollaktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
tollé tollaké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
tolléi tollakéi
Possessive forms of toll
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. tollam tollaim
2nd person sing. tollad tollaid
3rd person sing. tolla tollai
1st person plural tollunk tollaink
2nd person plural tollatok tollaitok
3rd person plural tolluk tollaik

Derived terms[edit]

Compound words

References[edit]

  1. ^ Entry #1075 in Uralonet, online Uralic etymological database of the Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungary.
  2. ^ toll in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Further reading[edit]

  • toll in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Icelandic[edit]

Noun[edit]

toll

  1. indefinite accusative singular of tollur

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish toll (hole, hollow; buttocks, hindquarters), from Proto-Celtic *tullom, *tullos (hole), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tew- (to push, hit). Cognate with Welsh twll.

Noun[edit]

toll m (genitive singular toill, nominative plural toill)

  1. hole, hollow
  2. posterior, buttocks
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish toll (pierced, perforated; hollow, empty).

Adjective[edit]

toll (genitive singular masculine toill, genitive singular feminine toille, plural tolla, comparative toille)

  1. pierced, perforated
  2. hollow, empty; (of voice) deep, hollow
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Irish tollaid (pierces; penetrates).

Verb[edit]

toll (present analytic tollann, future analytic tollfaidh, verbal noun tolladh, past participle tollta)

  1. to bore, to pierce, to perforate
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
toll tholl dtoll
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, page 23

Jamtish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse þǫll, from Proto-Norse *ᚦᚨᛚᚢ (*þallu), from Proto-Germanic *þallō. Cognate with Swedish tall, Icelandic þöll.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Brunflo, Hällesjö) IPA(key): [¹t̪ʰɔl̪ː]
  • (Berg) IPA(key): [¹t̪ʰɞ̞l̪ː]
  • (Stugun) IPA(key): [¹t̪ʰol̪ː]
  • (Fors) IPA(key): [¹t̪ʰɒl̪ː]

Noun[edit]

toll m

  1. pine, Scots pine tree, Pinus sylvestris

Declension[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English toll, from Proto-Germanic *tullō.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

toll (plural tolles)

  1. A toll, tax, or charge.
  2. The privilege to levy fees or charges.
  3. A waiver from any fees or charges.
  4. (rare) taxation, payment.
  5. (rare) A edge, point of difference
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: tool
  • Scots: towl
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

toll

  1. Alternative form of tollen (to bring).

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin teloneum and Old Norse tollr

Noun[edit]

toll m (definite singular tollen, indefinite plural toller, definite plural tollene)

  1. duty (customs duty, excise duty)
  2. customs
    gjennom tollento go through customs

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse þǫll, from Proto-Norse *ᚦᚨᛚᚢ (*þallu), from Proto-Germanic *þallō. Cognate with Jamtish toll, Icelandic þöll.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

toll f (definite singular tolla, indefinite plural toller, definite plural tollene)

  1. (young) pine
    • 1908, Ivar Kleiven, I Heimegrendi : Minne fraa Seksti-Aarom, Kristiania: Aschehoug:
      tolli stod tjukk som hampen so langt me kunde sjå
      the pine[s] stood thick as hemp for as long as we could see
    Synonym: fure
  2. soft pine wood
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Late Latin teloneum and Old Norse tollr

Noun[edit]

toll m (definite singular tollen, indefinite plural tollar, definite plural tollane)

  1. duty (customs duty, excise duty)
  2. customs
    gjennom tollento go through customs
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *tollą, from Vulgar Latin toloneum, from Late Latin teloneum, from Ancient Greek τελώνιον (telṓnion, toll-house), from τέλος (télos, tax). Germanic cognates include Old Saxon tol (Dutch tol), Old High German zol (German Zoll), Old Norse tollr (Swedish tull). See also parallel forms represented by Old English toln.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

toll n

  1. tax, toll, fare

Descendants[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish toll (hole, hollow; buttocks, hindquarters).

Noun[edit]

toll m (genitive singular tuill, plural tuill)

  1. hole, cavity, puncture, hollow
  2. crevice, perforation
  3. pit
  4. socket
  5. (nautical) hold of a ship
  6. (vulgar) arse
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish tollaid (pierces; penetrates), from toll (hole, hollow).

Verb[edit]

toll (past tholl, future tollaidh, verbal noun tolladh, past participle tollte)

  1. bore, piece, drill, perforate

Skolt Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Samic *tolë, from Proto-Uralic *tule.

Noun[edit]

toll

  1. fire

Inflection[edit]

Even â-stem, lˈl-l gradation
Nominative toll
Genitive tool
Singular Plural
Nominative toll tool
Accusative tool toolid
Genitive tool tooli
Illative toʹlle toolid
Locative toolâst toolin
Comitative toolin toolivuiʹm
Abessive tooltää toolitää
Essive tollân
Partitive tollâd
Possessive forms
Singular Dual Plural
1st person
2nd person
3rd person

Further reading[edit]

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[2], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Ter Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Samic *tolë, from Proto-Uralic *tule.

Noun[edit]

toll

  1. fire

Further reading[edit]

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[3], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland