trade

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See also: tradé and tråde

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English trade (path, course of conduct), introduced into English by Hanseatic merchants, from Middle Low German trade (track, course), from Old Saxon trada (spoor, track), from Proto-Germanic *tradō (track, way), and cognate with Old English tredan (to tread).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /tɹeɪd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Noun[edit]

trade (countable and uncountable, plural trades)

  1. (uncountable) Buying and selling of goods and services on a market.
    Synonym: commerce
  2. (countable) A particular instance of buying or selling.
    I did no trades with them once the rumors started.
    Synonyms: deal, barter
  3. (countable) An instance of bartering items in exchange for one another.
    • 1989, Bruce Pandolfini, Chess Openings: Traps and Zaps[1], →ISBN, Glossary, page 225:
      EXCHANGE — A trade or swap of no material profit to either side.
    • 2009, Elliott Kalb and Mark Weinstein, The 30 Greatest Sports Conspiracy Theories of All Time[2], →ISBN, page 60:
      When Golden State matched the Knicks' offer sheet, the Warriors and Knicks worked out a trade that sent King to New York for Richardson.
  4. (countable) Those who perform a particular kind of skilled work.
    The skilled trades were the first to organize modern labor unions.
    • 2006, Edwin Black, chapter 2, in Internal Combustion[3]:
      But through the oligopoly, charcoal fuel proliferated throughout London's trades and industries.  By the 1200s, brewers and bakers, tilemakers, glassblowers, pottery producers, and a range of other craftsmen all became hour-to-hour consumers of charcoal.
    Synonym: business
  5. (countable) Those engaged in an industry or group of related industries.
    It is not a retail showroom. It is only for the trade.
  6. (countable) The skilled practice of a practical occupation.
    He learned his trade as an apprentice.
    Synonym: craft
  7. (countable or uncountable) An occupation in the secondary sector, as opposed to an agricultural, professional or military one.
    After failing his entrance exams, he decided to go into a trade.
    Most veterans went into trade when the war ended.
    • 2007, Michael Lynch, The Oxford Companion to Scottish History, USA: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 228:
      Subsequently some Scottish troops settled, took up trade as weavers, tailors, or mariners, and married Dutch women.
    • 2012, Liberty Carrington, Wide Eyes Closed, AuthorHouse, →ISBN, page 92:
      Getting a job in your major is no breeze: Remember we made fun of those who took up a trade
  8. (uncountable, Britain) The business given to a commercial establishment by its customers.
    Even before noon there was considerable trade.
    Synonym: patronage
  9. (chiefly in the plural) Steady winds blowing from east to west above and below the equator.
    They rode the trades going west.
    • 1826 [1816], James Horsburgh, India Directory, Or Directions for Sailing to and from the East Indies, China, New Holland, Cape of Good Hope, Brazil and the Interjacent Ports[4], page 28:
      Calms and variable winds, are also experienced during every month of the year, in the space between the trades; [] the vicinity of the north-east trade seems most liable to them.
  10. (only as plural) A publication intended for participants in an industry or related group of industries.
    Rumors about layoffs are all over the trades.
  11. (uncountable, LGBT, slang) A brief sexual encounter.
    Josh picked up some trade last night.
  12. (obsolete, uncountable) Instruments of any occupation.
    • 1697, John Dryden, “The Third Book of the Georgics”, in The works of Virgil containing his Pastorals, Georgics and Aeneis[5], page 112:
      His House and household Gods! his trade of War, / His Bow and Quiver; and his trusty Cur.
  13. (mining) Refuse or rubbish from a mine.
  14. (obsolete) A track or trail; a way; a path; passage.
    • 1557, Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, The Second Book of Virgil's Æneid:
      A postern with a blind wicket there was, / A common trade to pass through Priam's house
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Book II:
      As Shepheardes curre, that in darke eveninges shade / Hath tracted forth some salvage beastes trade
    • c. 1595, William Shakespeare, Richard II, Act III, scene iii:
      Or, I'll be buried in the king's highway, / Some way of common trade, where subjects' feet / May hourly trample on their sovereign's head.
  15. (obsolete) Course; custom; practice; occupation.

Quotations[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Hyponyms of trade (noun)

Derived terms[edit]

Terms derived from trade (noun)

Related terms[edit]

Terms related to trade (noun)

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

trade (third-person singular simple present trades, present participle trading, simple past and past participle traded)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To engage in trade
    This company trades (in) precious metal.
    • 1727, John Arbuthnot, Tables of Ancient Coins, Weights and Measures[6], page 248:
      [] a free port, where Nations warring with one another resorted with their Goods, and traded as in a neutral Country.
    Synonym: deal
  2. (finance, intransitive, copulative) To be traded at a certain price or under certain conditions.
    Apple is trading at $200.
    ExxonMobil trades on the NYSE.
    The stock is trading rich relative to its sector.
  3. (transitive) To give (something) in exchange for.
    Will you trade your precious watch for my earring?
    Synonyms: exchange, swap, switch
  4. (horticulture, transitive or intransitive) To give someone a plant and receive a different one in return.
  5. (transitive, intransitive) To do business; offer for sale as for one's livelihood.
    Synonym: do business
  6. (intransitive) To have dealings; to be concerned or associated (with).

Quotations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

trade

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of treden

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

trade

  1. first-person singular present indicative of trader
  2. third-person singular present indicative of trader
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of trader
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of trader
  5. second-person singular imperative of trader

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Galician Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia gl
Trado ("auger")

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the medieval (Old Galician / Old Portuguese) form traado (13th century), from Late Latin taratrum (auger), attested by Isidore of Seville. Either from a pre-Roman substrate of Iberia or from Gaulish, from Proto-Celtic *taratrom, from Proto-Indo-European *térh₁-tro-.[1][2] Cognate with Portuguese trado, Spanish taladro, Old Irish tarathar, Old Welsh tarater, Breton tarar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trade m (plural trades)

  1. auger
    • 1448, X. Ferro Couselo (ed.), A vida e a fala dos devanceiros. Vigo: Galaxia, page 295:
      quatro traados et hua segur et hua aixola montisca
      four augers and a hatchet and an adze

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • traado” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • traad” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • trade” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • trade” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • trade” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ Corominas, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1991–1997), “taladro”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico, Madrid: Gredos
  2. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 370

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

trāde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of trādō

References[edit]

  • trade in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers