trade

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See also: tradé and tråde

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English trade (path, course of conduct), introduced into English by Hanseatic merchants, from Middle Low German trade (track, course), from Old Saxon trada (spoor, track), from Proto-Germanic *tradō (track, way), and cognate with Old English tredan (to tread).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trade (countable and uncountable, plural trades)

  1. (uncountable) Buying and selling of goods and services on a market.
    Synonym: commerce
  2. (countable) A particular instance of buying or selling.
    I did no trades with them once the rumors started.
    Synonyms: deal, barter
  3. (countable) An instance of bartering items in exchange for one another.
    • 1989, Bruce Pandolfini, Chess Openings: Traps and Zaps[1], →ISBN, Glossary, page 225:
      EXCHANGE — A trade or swap of no material profit to either side.
    • 2009, Elliott Kalb and Mark Weinstein, The 30 Greatest Sports Conspiracy Theories of All Time[2], →ISBN, page 60:
      When Golden State matched the Knicks' offer sheet, the Warriors and Knicks worked out a trade that sent King to New York for Richardson.
  4. (countable) Those who perform a particular kind of skilled work.
    The skilled trades were the first to organize modern labor unions.
    • 2006, Edwin Black, chapter 2, in Internal Combustion[3]:
      But through the oligopoly, charcoal fuel proliferated throughout London's trades and industries.  By the 1200s, brewers and bakers, tilemakers, glassblowers, pottery producers, and a range of other craftsmen all became hour-to-hour consumers of charcoal.
    Synonym: business
  5. (countable) Those engaged in an industry or group of related industries.
    It is not a retail showroom. It is only for the trade.
  6. (countable) The skilled practice of a practical occupation.
    He learned his trade as an apprentice.
    Synonym: craft
  7. (countable or uncountable) An occupation in the secondary sector; as opposed to an agricultural, professional or military one.
    After failing his entrance exams, he decided to go into a trade.
    Most veterans went into trade when the war ended.
    • 2007, Michael Lynch, The Oxford Companion to Scottish History, USA: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 228:
      Subsequently some Scottish troops settled, took up trade as weavers, tailors, or mariners, and married Dutch women.
    • 2012, Liberty Carrington, Wide Eyes Closed, AuthorHouse, →ISBN, page 92:
      Getting a job in your major is no breeze: Remember we made fun of those who took up a trade
  8. (uncountable, Britain) The business given to a commercial establishment by its customers.
    Even before noon there was considerable trade.
    Synonym: patronage
  9. (chiefly in the plural) Steady winds blowing from east to west above and below the equator.
    They rode the trades going west.
    • (Can we date this quote?), James Horsburgh, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      the north-east trade
  10. (only as plural) A publication intended for participants in an industry or related group of industries.
    Rumors about layoffs are all over the trades.
  11. (uncountable, LGBT, slang) A brief sexual encounter.
    Josh picked up some trade last night.
  12. (obsolete, uncountable) Instruments of any occupation.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Dryden, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      the house and household goods, his trade of war
  13. (mining) Refuse or rubbish from a mine.
  14. (obsolete) A track or trail; a way; a path; passage.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Surrey, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      A postern with a blind wicket there was, / A common trade to pass through Priam's house.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Spenser, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Hath tracted forth some salvage beastes trade.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Shakespeare, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Or, I'll be buried in the king's highway, / Some way of common trade, where subjects' feet / May hourly trample on their sovereign's head.
  15. (obsolete) Course; custom; practice; occupation.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Udall, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      the right trade of religion
    • (Can we date this quote?), Spenser, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      There those five sisters had continual trade.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Massinger, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Long did I love this lady, / Long was my travel, long my trade to win her.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Shakespeare, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Thy sin's not accidental but a trade.

Quotations[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

trade (third-person singular simple present trades, present participle trading, simple past and past participle traded)

  1. (intransitive) To engage in trade
    This company trades in precious metal.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Arbuthnot, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      a free port, where nations [] resorted with their goods and traded
    Synonym: deal
  2. (intransitive) To be traded at a certain price or under certain conditions.
  3. (transitive) To give (something) in exchange for.
    Will you trade your precious watch for my earring?
    Synonyms: exchange, swap, switch
  4. (horticulture, transitive or intransitive) To give someone a plant and receive a different one in return.
  5. (intransitive or transitive) To do business; offer for sale as for one's livelihood.
    Synonyms: do business, make a deal
  6. (intransitive) To have dealings; to be concerned or associated (with).
    • (Can we date this quote?), Shakespeare, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      How did you dare to trade and traffic with Macbeth?

Quotations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

trade

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of treden

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

trade

  1. first-person singular present indicative of trader
  2. third-person singular present indicative of trader
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of trader
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of trader
  5. second-person singular imperative of trader

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Galician Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia gl
Trado ("auger")

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the medieval form traado (13th century), from Late Latin taratrum (auger), attested by Isidore of Seville. Either from a pre-Roman substrate of Iberia or from Gaulish, from Proto-Celtic *taratrom, from Proto-Indo-European *térh₁-tro-.[1][2] Cognate with Portuguese trado, Spanish taladro, Old Irish tarathar, Old Welsh tarater, Breton tarar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trade m (plural trades)

  1. auger
    • 1448, X. Ferro Couselo (ed.), A vida e a fala dos devanceiros. Vigo: Galaxia, page 295:
      quatro traados et hua segur et hua aixola montisca
      four augers and a hatchet and an adze

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • traado” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • traad” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • trade” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • trade” in Santamarina, Antón (coord.): Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  • trade” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ Coromines, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1991–1997). Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico. Madrid: Gredos, s.v. taladro.
  2. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 370

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

trāde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of trādō

References[edit]

  • trade in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers