transgender

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From trans- +‎ gender. First used in English by John Oliven in 1965,[1] the term had acquired its current senses by the 1990s (by which time it had also largely displaced the earlier term transsexual; see usage notes).[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

transgender ‎(not comparable)

  1. (narrowly, of a person) Having a gender which is different from one's natal sex: being assigned male at birth but having a female gender or vice versa. (Compare transsexual, and the following sense.)
    • 2010, Jessica Green, "I'm sorry, I'm not lesbian", The Guardian, 3 Mar 2010:
      One head of a small gay charity visibly flinched when I mentioned my boyfriend and has been cold towards me ever since. I've even caught someone staring down my top to see if I'm transgender.
    • 2010, Natasha Lennard, "City Room", New York Times, 7 Apr 2010:
      But the inclusion of the word “trannie” — a pejorative, in some circles — in the title, and the film’s parodic representation of transgender women, has offended many people.
  2. (broadly, of a person) Not identifying with culturally conventional gender roles and categories of male or female; having changed gender identity from male to female or female to male, or identifying with elements of both, or having some other gender identity. (Compare genderqueer, transsexual, and transvestite.)
    • 1992, Maximum rocknroll, number 109‎: 
      I think the new punk rockers are going to be more androgynous, more bisexual, more transgender, more ethnically diverse and less willing to take shit than ...
    • 1998, John Cloud, "Trans across America", Time, 20 Feb 1998:
      Their first step was to reclaim the power to name themselves: transgender is now the term most widely used, and it encompasses everyone from cross-dressers (those who dress in clothes of the opposite sex) to transsexuals (those who surgically "correct" their genitals to match their "real" gender).

Usage notes[edit]

  • The term transgender was coined in 1965[1] and popularized in the late 1970s,[3][4] and by the 1990s it had largely displaced (and encompassed as a subset) the older term transsexual.[2] Transsexual is now often considered outdated[3] although some people still prefer it; see its entry for more. Neither term should be confused with transvestite (which see for more).
  • For the usage of this word (and similar adjectives) as a noun, see below.

Synonyms[edit]

  • TG (abbreviated form)

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

transgender ‎(usually uncountable, plural transgenders)

  1. (now rare) Transgenderism; the state of being transgender. (Compare transsex.)
    • 2007, Alison Stone, An Introduction to Feminist Philosophy (ISBN 074563883X), page 41
      Before we can answer this question, we need to consider two other phenomena – transsex and transgender – which also expose the muddle within conventional categories of sex.
  2. (sometimes considered offensive) A transgender person.
    • 2005, Walter Bockting & Eric Avery, Transgender Health and HIV Prevention, p. 116:
      In a patriarchal society in which machismo rules, MTF transgenders represent a challenge to traditional masculinity due to their renouncing of the male position of social power.
    • 2006, Jayne Caudwell, Sport, Sexualities and Queer/theory, p. 122:
      Individual transgenders could compete in any division; however, transgender teams could not play against biological women's teams.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Many transgender people consider the use of transgender (and similar adjectives, like transsexual) as a noun to be offensive, and several guides advise against such usage.[5][6][7][8] "A transgender man" (for a man who is biologically female, or was biologically female prior to sex reassignment) or "a transgender woman" (for the reverse) is frequently more appropriate.

Hypernyms[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

transgender ‎(third-person singular simple present transgenders, present participle transgendering, simple past and past participle transgendered)

  1. (uncommon) To change the gender of; (used loosely) to change the sex of. (Compare transsex.)
    • 2005, Sue Tolleson-Rinehart, ‎Jyl J. Josephson, Gender and American Politics (ISBN 0765631563), pages 15 and 205:
      [] and one that is still dominated by male nominees, women nominees might be seen as either contributing to the regendering, or the transgendering, of the Cabinet.
      []
      This chapter examines women secretaries-designate in terms of their contributions to regendering or transgendering a cabinet office, to a gender desegregation or integration of the cabinet.
    • For usage examples of this term, see Citations:transgender.

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Thomas E. Bevan, The Psychobiology of Transsexualism and Transgenderism (2014, ISBN 1440831270), page 42: "The term transsexual was introduced by Cauldwell (1949) and popularized by Harry Benjamin (1966) [...]. The term transgender was coined by John Oliven (1965) and popularized by various transgender people [... including] many transgender people [who] advocated the use of the term much more than Prince. [...] Transsexuals constitute a subset of transgender people."
  2. 2.0 2.1 Transgender Rights (2006, ISBN 0816643121), edited by Paisley Currah, Richard M. Juang, Shannon Minter; page 4: "From signifying a subject position between cross-dresser and transsexual, the meaning of transgender expanded radically in the early 1990s to include them, along with other cross-gender practices and identities."
  3. 3.0 3.1 transgender” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  4. ^ transgender” in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Online
  5. ^ GLAAD media reference guide:
    Problematic: "transgenders," "a transgender"
    Preferred: transgender people, a transgender person
    Transgender should be used as an adjective, not as a noun. Do not say, "Tony is a transgender," or "The parade included many transgenders." Instead say, "Tony is a transgender man," or "The parade included many transgender people."
  6. ^ Reuters Handbook of Journalism: Do not use transgender as a noun; no one should be referred to as “a transgender.”
  7. ^ Guardian and Observer style guide: use transgender [...] only as an adjective: transgender person, trans person; never "transgendered person" or "a transgender"
  8. ^ BBC News style guide: "Do not say 'transsexuals', in the same way we would not talk about 'gays' or 'blacks'."

Afrikaans[edit]

Adjective[edit]

transgender

  1. transgender

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English transgender. See also gender.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

transgender ‎(invariable, not comparable)

  1. transgender

See also[edit]