unsusceptible

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

un- +‎ susceptible

Adjective[edit]

unsusceptible (comparative more unsusceptible, superlative most unsusceptible)

  1. Not susceptible.
    • 1751, Samuel Johnson, The Rambler, 28 May, 1751, in Frank Brady and W. K. Wimsatt (eds.) Samuel Johnson: Selected Poetry and Prose, Berkeley: University of California Press, p. 202,[1]
      Imagination, a licentious and vagrant faculty, unsusceptible of limitations, and impatient of restraint, has always endeavored to baffle the logician, to perplex the confines of distinction, and burst the enclosures of regularity.
    • 1817, William Wordsworth, “Vernal Ode,” Stanza III,[2]
      Mortals, rejoice! the very Angels quit
      Their mansions unsusceptible of change,
      Amid your pleasant bowers to sit,
      And through your sweet vicissitudes to range!
    • 1818, Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, Chapter ,[3]
      It would be mortifying to the feelings of many ladies, could they be made to understand how little the heart of man is affected by what is costly or new in their attire; how little it is biased by the texture of their muslin, and how unsusceptible of peculiar tenderness towards the spotted, the sprigged, the mull, or the jackonet.
    • 1873, John Stuart Mill, Autobiography, Chapter 5,[4]
      I was in a dull state of nerves, such as everybody is occasionally liable to; unsusceptible to enjoyment or pleasurable excitement; one of those moods when what is pleasure at other times, becomes insipid or indifferent; the state, I should think, in which converts to Methodism usually are, when smitten by their first “conviction of sin.”
    • 1994, José Casanova, Public Religions in the Modern World, University of Chicago Press, Chapter 2, p. 40,[5]
      Of all social phenomena none is perhaps as protean and, consequently, as unsusceptible to binary classification as religion.
    • 2007 May 13, Liesl Schillinger, “The Year of the Dog”, in New York Times[6]:
      For the uninitiated or unsusceptible, it’s a dog thing: you wouldn’t understand.