upward

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English upweardes, equivalent to up +‎ -ward.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈʌpwɜː(ɹ)d/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈʌpwəd/

Adverb[edit]

upward (comparative more upward, superlative most upward)

  1. In a direction from lower to higher; toward a higher place; in a course toward the source or origin
    We ran upward
    • (Can we date this quote by Richard Hooker and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Looking inward, we are stricken dumb; looking upward, we speak and prevail.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 23, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      If the afternoon was fine they strolled together in the park, very slowly, and with pauses to draw breath wherever the ground sloped upward. The slightest effort made the patient cough.
  2. In the upper parts; above.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 1”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      Dagon his name, sea monster, upward man, / And downward fish.
  3. Yet more; indefinitely more; above; over.

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Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

upward (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) The upper part; the top.

Adjective[edit]

upward (comparative more upward, superlative most upward)

  1. Directed toward a higher place.
    with upward eye; with upward course

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