valet

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: válet

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French valet, from Old French vaslet, from *vassellittus, diminutive of Late Latin vassallus (manservant, domestic, retainer), from vassus (servant), from Gaulish *wassos (young man, squire), from Proto-Celtic *wastos (servant) (compare Old Irish foss and Welsh gwas).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈvæleɪ/, /ˈvælɪt/
  • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈvæleɪ/, /væˈleɪ/, /ˈvælɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ælɪt, -æleɪ, -eɪ

Noun[edit]

valet (plural valets)

  1. A man's personal male attendant, responsible for his clothes and appearance.
  2. A hotel employee performing such duties for guests.
  3. (professional wrestling) A female performer in professional wrestling, acting as either a manager or personal chaperone; often used to attract and titillate male members of the audience.
  4. A female chaperone who accompanies a man, and is usually not married to him.
  5. (US) A person employed to clean or park cars.
    Synonym: parking attendant
  6. A person employed to assist the jockey and trainer at a racecourse.
  7. A wooden stand on which to hold clothes and accessories in preparation for dressing.
  8. A kind of goad or stick with an iron point.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Verb[edit]

valet (third-person singular simple present valets, present participle valeting, simple past and past participle valeted)

  1. (transitive) To serve (someone) as a valet.
    • 1866, Wilkie Collins, Armadale, London: Smith, Elder & Co., Volume I, Book 2, Chapter 2, p. 163,[1]
      You can valet me, can you? Bother valeting me! I like to put on my own clothes, and brush them, too, when they are on; and if I only knew how to black my own boots, by George I should like to do it!
    • 1926, Neville Shute, Marazan, London: Cassell, Chapter Seven,[2]
      [] the red-haired boy who had valeted me in the morning appeared in a plain suit of black.
  2. (transitive, chiefly Britain, Ireland) To clean and service (a car), as a valet does.
    • 2017, Stephen Maguire, “Hero Irish dad reveals he had to tell car valet he ‘wasn’t up to anything illegal’ after wife gave birth on back seat on Donegal road,” The Irish Sun, 7 March, 2017,[3]
      He revealed: “We had been through a lot and I decided the car needed to be cleaned out after Georgina had to deliver the baby in the car.
      “You can imagine the scene when I left the car in for valeting. I got some funny looks and I had to explain to the guy that I wasn’t up to anything illegal because it did look a bit like a crime scene.”
  3. (transitive, US) To leave (a car) with a valet to park it.
    • 2012, Jay Weston, “One of the Most Eligible Bachelors in L.A. Has 55 Ferraris.. and Takes Me for a Drive in One!” The Huffington Post, 30 May, 2012,[4]
      I asked Giacomo if he ever valeted his car, and he twisted his face into a grimace as he replied, “Rarely, but I have done it. Nervous time.”
    • 2017, Rosalie R. Radomsky, “Emma Ludbrook and Tom Windish: Their First Date Was a Big Production,” The New York Times, 11 February, 2017,[5]
      “‘Is this a date?’” Ms. Ludbrook recalled thinking during dinner. “I had valeted my car, and he hadn’t. He said, ‘Bye,’ and went to his car. Clearly this was not a date.”

Further reading[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Noun[edit]

valet

  1. partitive singular of vale

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French vaslet, from *vassellittus, diminutive of Late Latin vassallus (manservant, domestic, retainer), from vassus (servant), from Gaulish *wassos (young man, squire), from Proto-Celtic *wastos (servant) (compare Old Irish foss and Welsh gwas).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

valet m (plural valets)

  1. (historical) a male attendant of a knight or a lord
  2. (historical) officer belonging to the king's house or a princely house, also valet de chambre
  3. a male servant, a footman
  4. a wooden stand on which to hold clothes and accessories in preparation for dressing, also valet de nuit
  5. (card games) jack

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Turkish: vale

See also[edit]

Playing cards in French · cartes à jouer (layout · text)
Ace of spades.svg 2 of spades.svg 3 of spades.svg 4 of spades.svg 5 of spades.svg 6 of spades.svg 7 of spades.svg
as deux trois quatre cinq six sept
8 of spades.svg 9 of spades.svg 10 of spades.svg Jack of spades2.svg Queen of spades2.svg King of spades2.svg Joker black 02.svg
huit neuf dix valet dame roi joker

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

valet

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of valeō

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French vaslet.

Noun[edit]

valet m (plural valets)

  1. manservant; (male) attendant

Descendants[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French valet.

Noun[edit]

valet m (plural valets)

  1. (Jersey) This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
  2. (Jersey, card games) jack

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

valet n

  1. singular definite of val

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French valet

Noun[edit]

valet m, f (plural valets)

  1. valet (a person employed to park cars)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French valet.

Noun[edit]

valet m (plural valeți)

  1. valet

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French valet.

Noun[edit]

valet m (plural valets)

  1. (card games) jack, knave

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

valet

  1. definite singular of val

Anagrams[edit]