venus

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Venus, Venüs, Vénus, and Vênus

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From translingual Venus (a genus of clams), from Latin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

venus (plural venuses)

  1. Any of the bivalve molluscs in the genus Venus or family Veneridae.

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Verb[edit]

venus

  1. conditional of veni

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Participle[edit]

venus m pl

  1. masculine plural of venu

Ido[edit]

Verb[edit]

venus

  1. conditional of venar

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *wénh₁-os ~ *wénh₁-es-os (loveliness), from the root *wenh₁- (to wish, love).[1] Cognate with Sanskrit वनस् (vánas, loveliness, desire) and possibly also cognate with Old Norse vanir and Old English wana (gods of love). Some sources, assuming the theonym Venus being the primary sense, consider the plain sense loveliness as figurative or transferred, and similarly many edited works show the term as capitalised. Etymological evindence, on the other hand, shows how it is the name of the goddess that derives from this, the original sense, through personification.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

venus f (genitive veneris); third declension

  1. (uncountable) loveliness, attractiveness, beauty, grace, elegance, charm
  2. (countable) love, beloved (person or object)
  3. See Venus.
Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative venus venerēs
Genitive veneris venerum
Dative venerī veneribus
Accusative venerem venerēs
Ablative venere veneribus
Vocative venus venerēs
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Oscan: ϝενζηι (venzēi, dat.sg.)[1]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “venus, -eris”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 663

Further reading[edit]

  • venus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

vēnus m

  1. Theoretical form of vēnum used as lemma by some dictionaries.
Declension[edit]

Fourth/second-declension noun (defective), singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative
Genitive
Dative vēnuī
vēnō
Accusative vēnum
Ablative
Vocative

Further reading[edit]

  • venus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • venus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • venus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Venus, borrowed from Latin Venus. So named because of its astrological association with the planet.

Noun[edit]

venus (uncountable)

  1. (rare) The reddish-brown metal; copper.
    • 1475, The Book of Quintessence:
      This water forsoþe is so strong, þat if a litil drope þerof falle vpon ȝoure hond, anoon it wole perce it þoruȝ-out; and in þe same maner it wole do, if it falle vpon a plate of venus.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Piedmontese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vēnōsus.

Adjective[edit]

venus

  1. venous