verbal

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See also: vèrbal

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Old French verbal, from Late Latin verbālis (belonging to a word). Equivalent to verb +‎ -al.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

verbal (not comparable)

  1. Of or relating to words.
    Synonym: wordish
  2. Concerned with the words, rather than the substance of a text.
  3. Consisting of words only.
    Antonyms: non-verbal, substantive
    • 1864, Henry Mayhew, German Life and Manners as Seen in Saxony at the Present
      We subjoin an engraving [] which will give the reader a far better notion of the structure than any verbal description could convey to the mind.
    • 1861, Charles Dickens, Great Expectations:
      It was not a verbal remark, but a proceeding in dumb-show
  4. Expressly spoken rather than written; oral.
    a verbal contract
    a verbal testimony
    • 1861, Charles Dickens, Great Expectations:
      You can't have verbal communication with a man in New South Wales, you know.
    • 1944, George Orwell, “What is Fascism?”, in Tribune:
      I am not speaking of the verbal use of the term 'Fascist'. I am speaking of what I have seen in print.
  5. (grammar) Derived from, or having the nature of a verb.
    Synonym: rhematic
  6. (grammar) Used to form a verb.
  7. Capable of speech.
    Antonym: preverbal
    • 2005, Avril V. Brereton, Bruce J. Tonge, Pre-schoolers with autism (page 55)
      How do these language problems affect the behaviour of verbal children?
  8. Word for word.
    Synonyms: literal, verbatim
    a verbal translation
  9. (obsolete) Abounding with words; verbose.
    • 1611 April (first recorded performance), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Cymbeline”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene iii]:
      You put me to forget a lady’s manners
      By being so verbal; and learn now, for all,
      That I, which know my heart, do here pronounce
      By th’ very truth of it, I care not for you

Synonyms[edit]

  • (of or relating to speech or words): lectic

Antonyms[edit]

  • (expressly spoken or written): implied
  • (expressly stated): unsaid

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

verbal (plural verbals)

  1. (grammar) A verb form which does not function as a predicate, or a word derived from a verb. In English, infinitives, participles and gerunds are verbals.
    Synonym: non-finite verb
  2. (Britain, Ireland) A spoken confession given to police.
    • 1982, New South Wales. Parliament, Parliamentary Debates, page 2496:
      They were convicted on the evidence of an agent provocateur named Richard Seary, backed up by police verbals from three police officers who gave evidence of six verbals in which the three accused were supposed to have admitted their guilt.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

verbal (third-person singular simple present verbals, present participle verballing, simple past and past participle verballed)

  1. (transitive, Britain, Australia) To induce into fabricating a confession.
    • 1982, John A. Andrews, Human Rights in Criminal Procedure: A Comparative Study, →ISBN, BRILL, page 128:
      "The problem of 'verballing' is unlikely to disappear, whatever the legal status of the person detained."
    • 2001, Chris Cunneen, Conflict, Politics and Crime: Aboriginal Communities and the Police, →ISBN, Allen & Unwin, page 116:
      "Condren had always claimed that he was assaulted and verballed by police over the murder he had supposedly confessed to committing."
    • 2004, Jeremy Gans & Andrew Palmer, Australian Principles of Evidence, →ISBN, Routledge Cavendish, page 504:
      "Moreover, given the risk of verballing, it is by no means apparent that it is in the interests of justice that the prosecution have the benefit of admissions that are made on occasions when recordings are impracticable."

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

verbal m or f (plural verbals)

  1. (grammar) verbal (relating to verbs)

Related terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin verbālis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

verbal (masculine and feminine plural verbals)

  1. verbal (of or relating to words)
  2. verbal (spoken rather than written)
  3. (grammar) verbal (relating to verbs)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin verbālis. Synchronically analysable as verbe +‎ -al.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

verbal (feminine singular verbale, masculine plural verbaux, feminine plural verbales)

  1. verbal

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

verbal (not comparable)

  1. verbal
    Synonym: mündlich

Declension[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch verbaal, from Middle French verbal, from Latin verbālis. Doublet of perbal.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [vərˈbal]
  • Hyphenation: vêr‧bal

Adjective[edit]

verbal or vêrbal

  1. verbal,
    1. expressly spoken rather than written; oral.
    2. (linguistics) pertaining to verbs

Further reading[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin verbālis.

Adjective[edit]

verbal m or f (plural verbais, comparable)

  1. verbal, oral

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French verbal, from Latin verbalis.

Adjective[edit]

verbal m or n (feminine singular verbală, masculine plural verbali, feminine and neuter plural verbale)

  1. verbal

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin verbālis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /beɾˈbal/, [beɾˈβ̞al]

Adjective[edit]

verbal (plural verbales)

  1. verbal (of or relating to words)
  2. verbal (spoken rather than written)
  3. (grammar) verbal (relating to verbs)

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

verbal m or f (plural verbales)|verbales

  1. (grammar) verbal

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse *viðribarðr (from berja.)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /²ˈʋɪːɾˌbɑːɽ/, /²ˈʋɪːɾˌbɒːɽ/

Adjective[edit]

verbal

  1. weather-beaten