verbum

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See also: Verbum

Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

verbum (plural verba)

  1. verb

Synonyms[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin verbum

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

verbum n

  1. verb

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • verbum in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • verbum in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

From Latin verbum (word). In the grammatical sense, the Latin word translated Ancient Greek ῥῆμα (rhêma, word, verb).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

verbum n (singular definite verbet, plural indefinite verber)

  1. (grammar) verb (a word that indicates an action, event, or a state)

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin verbum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈvɛr.bʏm/
  • Hyphenation: ver‧bum

Noun[edit]

verbum n (plural verba)

  1. (grammar) verb
    Synonym: werkwoord

Usage notes[edit]

In Dutch verbum is a relatively technical term chiefly used by specialists, such as linguists and historians, and people with training in classical languages. The more generally understood term is werkwoord.

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *werβom, from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰh₁om (word). Cognate with Umbrian 𐌖𐌄𐌓𐌚𐌀𐌋𐌄 (uerfale), English word.

In the grammatical sense of “verb”, it is a calque of Ancient Greek ῥῆμᾰ (rhêma).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

verbum n (genitive verbī); second declension

  1. word
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 5.539-540:
      verba movent īram nōn circumspectā deōrum:
      ‘quam nequeam’ dīxit ‘vincere, nūlla fera est.’
      Words, without having been considered, excite the anger of the gods:
      “There is no wild beast,” [Orion] said, “such as I am unable to defeat!”

      (See: Orion (mythology).)
    • [90-110] Biblia [Bible], volume Novum Testamentum [New Testament] (canonical gospel, in Aramaic), Evangelium secundum Ioannem [Gospel according to John], chapter 1, verse 1, line 1–3:
      In principio erat Verbum,
      et Verbum erat apud Deum,
      et Deus erat Verbum.
      In principle was the Word,
      the Word was with God
      and the Word was God.
    • Res, non verba.actions speak louder than words (literally, “things, not words”)
  2. proverb, saying
  3. (grammar) verb
  4. (in the plural) language, discourse, expressions

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative verbum verba
Genitive verbī verbōrum
Dative verbō verbīs
Accusative verbum verba
Ablative verbō verbīs
Vocative verbum verba

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • verbum”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • verbum”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • verbum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to crave humbly; to supplicate: supplicibus verbis orare
    • what he said made a deep impression on..: hoc verbum alte descendit in pectus alicuius
    • to agree in fact but not in word: re concinere, verbis discrepare
    • to address a meeting of the people: verba facere apud populum, in contione
    • pathos; passion: magniloquentia, granditas verborum
    • the plain style: verborum tenuitias, oratio subtilis
    • well-chosen language, grace of style: ornatus orationis, verborum
    • to explain one's sentiments: sententias (verbis) explicare, aperire
    • to express clearly, make a lifelike representation of a thing: exprimere aliquid verbis or oratione (vid. sect. VI. 3, note adumbrare...)
    • the connection: perpetuitas verborum
    • to go deeply into a matter, discuss it fully: multa verba facere
    • to give a full, detailed account of a thing: pluribus verbis, copiosius explicare, persequi aliquid
    • the circumstances are described in language worthy of them: rebus verba respondent
    • to be unable to say all one wants: verbis non omnia exsequi posse
    • I have abundance to say: res (opp. verba) mihi suppetit
    • to translate literally, word for word (not verbo tenus): ad verbum transferre, exprimere
    • to translate literally, word for word (not verbo tenus): verbum e verbo exprimere
    • to translate literally, word for word (not verbo tenus): verbum pro verbo reddere
    • to translate literally, word for word (not verbo tenus): totidem verbis transferre
    • to translate freely: his fere verbis, hoc fere modo convertere, transferre
    • the structure of the sentence: compositio, structura verborum
    • the period: ambitus, circuitus, comprehensio, continuatio (verborum, orationis), also simply periodus
    • the construction: constructio, structura verborum, forma dicendi
    • profusion of words: copia, ubertas verborum
    • to be rich in words: verbis abundantem esse, abundare
    • poverty of expression: inopia verborum
    • to employ carefully chosen expressions: lectissimis verbis uti (De Or. 3. 37)
    • obsolete, ambiguous expressions: prisca, obsoleta (opp. usitata), ambigua verba
    • nominally; really: verbo, nomine; re, re quidem vera
    • literally: si verba spectas
    • in some one's name; on some one's behalf (not nomine alicuius): verbis alicuius, e.g. salutare (Liv. 9. 36)
    • these are mere empty phrases: haec verba sunt (Ter. Phorm. 3. 2. 32)
    • mere words; empty sound: inanis verborum sonitus
    • senseless rant: inanium verborum flumen
    • to not say a word: nullum (omnino) verbum facere
    • to say not a syllable about a person: ne verbum (without unum) quidem de aliquo facere
    • to speak on a subject: verba facere (de aliqua re, apud aliquem)
    • to extract a word from some one: verbum ex aliquo elicere
    • to hold an altercation with a man: verbis concertare or altercari cum aliquo (B. C. 3. 19. 6)
    • an altercation, debate: verborum concertatio
    • to say only a few words: pauca dicere (pauca verba dicere only of the orator)
    • all this means to say: omnia verba huc redeunt
    • no word escaped him: nullum verbum ex ore eius excidit (or simply ei)
    • to unable to find a suitable expression: verbo parum valere (Tusc. 3. 5. 11)
    • not to understand a single word: verbum prorsus nullum intellegere
    • to introduce a new word into the Latin language: inducere novum verbum in latinam linguam
    • to invent, form words: verba parere, fingere, facere
    • to form, derive a word from... (used of the man who first creates the word): vocabulum, verbum, nomen ducere ab, ex...
    • to derive a word from... (used of an etymologist): verbum ductum esse a...putare
    • to derive a word from... (used of an etymologist): originem verbi repetere a...
    • to give the etymological explanation of words: nomina enodare or verborum origines quaerere, indagare
    • what is the meaning, the original sense of this word: quae est vis huius verbi?
    • the fundamental meaning of a word: vis et notio verbi, vocabuli
    • to hold by the letter (of the law): verba ac litteras or scriptum (legis) sequi (opp. sententia the spirit)
    • the order of words: ordo verborum (Or. 63. 214)
    • a figurative expression; a word used metaphorically: verbum translatum (Or. 27. 92)
    • well-arranged words: verba composita
    • a trope; metonymy: verborum immutatio
    • it was said long ago that..: vetus (verbum) est (c. Acc. c. Inf.)
    • minute, pedantic carping at words: verborum aucupium or captatio
    • the text of the author (not textus): verba, oratio, exemplum scriptoris
    • to strike out, delete a word: inducere verbum (Phil. 13. 19. 43)
    • the terms, contents of the letter are as follows: litterae in hanc sententiam or his verbis scriptae sunt
    • insulting expressions: voces (verba) contumeliosae
    • insulting expressions: verborum contumeliae
    • to deceive a person, throw dust in his eyes: verba dare alicui (Att. 15. 16)
    • to read prayers for the congregation to repeat: praeire verba (carmen) (Liv. 31. 17)
    • a word with you: tribus verbis te volo
    • remember me to your brother: nuntia fratri tuo salutem verbis meis (Fam. 7. 14)
    • to use Cicero's expression; to say with Cicero (not ut cum Cicerone loquar): ut Ciceronis verbis utar
    • to use the mildest expression: ut levissime dicam (opp. ut gravissimo verbo utar)
  • verbum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Meyer-Lübke, Wilhelm (1911), “vĕrbum”, in Romanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), page 703