vice

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See also: Vice, více, vice-, and vicĕ

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English vice, from Old French vice, from Latin vitium (fault or blemish). Displaced native Old English unþēaw.

Noun[edit]

vice (plural vices)

  1. A bad habit.
    Gluttony is a vice, not a virtue.
    Smoking was a vice Sally picked up in high school.
  2. (law) Any of various crimes related (depending on jurisdiction) to weapons, prostitution, pornography, gambling, alcohol, tobacco, or drugs.
  3. A defect in the temper or behaviour of a horse, such as to make the animal dangerous, to injure its health, or to diminish its usefulness.
    • 1839, From the case of Scholefield v. Robb Gilligan, Brenda (2002) Practical Horse Law[1], →ISBN: “So a horse with say, navicular disease, making him suitable only for light hacking, would probably be unsound, whereas rearing would be a vice, being a "defect in the temper... making it dangerous". A vice can however render a horse unsound - possibly a crib biter will damage its wind.”
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See vise.

Noun[edit]

vice (plural vices)

  1. Alternative spelling of vise (mechanical screw apparatus used for clamping)
  2. A tool for drawing lead into cames, or flat grooved rods, for casements.
  3. (architecture) A winding or spiral staircase.
  4. (obsolete) A grip or grasp.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

vice (third-person singular simple present vices, present participle vicing, simple past and past participle viced)

  1. Alternative spelling of vise (to hold or squeeze with a vice)
    • c. 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The VVinters Tale”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene ii], line 416, page 281:
      Camillo. As he had ſeen’t, or beene an Instrument / To vice you to't, that you haue toucht his Queene / Forbiddenly.
    • 1849, Thomas De Quincey, “The Vision of Sudden Death”, in Blackwood's Magazine:
      The coachman's hand was viced between his upper and lower thigh.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin vice (in place of), ablative form of vicis. Compare French fois (time) and Spanish vez (time, turn).

Adjective[edit]

vice (not comparable)

  1. in place of; subordinate to; designating a person below another in rank
Derived terms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

vice

  1. (dated) instead of, in place of, versus (sense 2)
Usage notes[edit]
  • While rare in modern standard English, this usage still appears among members of the United States military.
  • Statements such as "vice Jones, who had resigned" may be abbreviated "vice Jones, resigned"

Noun[edit]

vice (plural vices)

  1. One who acts in place of a superior.
    • c. 1850s-1870s, Edward Minister and Son, The Gazette of Fashion and Cutting-Room Companion
      The health of the Vice was proposed in appropriate language; in replying, Mr. Marriott thanked the company []

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

vice

  1. in rows

Related terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French vice, from Old French vice, borrowed from Latin vitium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vice m (plural vices)

  1. vice (clarification of this definition is needed)

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English vice-French vice-German vize-Italian vice-Russian ви́це- (více-)Spanish vice-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

vice

  1. instead, instead of

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Progreso III (in Ido), 1910–1911, page 102
  • Progreso IV (in Ido), 1911–1912, pages 211, 408, 409
  • Progreso V (in Ido), 1912–1913, page 723
  • Progreso VII (in Ido), 1914, page 130

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vicem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vice m or f (invariable)

  1. deputy, substitute, vice

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vice

  1. ablative singular of vicis

Preposition[edit]

vice

  1. in place of, subordinate to

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: vice-
  • French: vice
  • Ido: vice
  • Italian: vice
  • Piedmontese: vice
  • Swedish: vice

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

vīce

  1. vocative singular of vīcus

References[edit]

  • vice in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • vice in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • vice in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French vice, visse, from Latin vitium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vice (plural vices)

  1. A fault or imperfection; a negative quality or attribute of something:
    1. A bad habit or tendency that one has; a negative human behaviour.
    2. A mistake; a fault due to deficience in knowledge or reasoning.
    3. (rare) An imperfection or blemish in one's visage or look.
  2. Vice, iniquity, sinful behaviour; absence of virtue or morality:
    1. A vice; a general tendency or action that is morally bad.
    2. A specific example of immoral or sinful behaviour.
  3. A sickness, disease or malady; a deleterious process effecting something.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French vice, borrowed from Latin vitium.

Noun[edit]

vice m (plural vices)

  1. vice (bad habit)

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

vice m, f (plural vices)

  1. used as an abbreviation of any word containing the prefix vice-

Slovene[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʋìːt͡sɛ/, /ʋíːt͡sɛ/

Noun[edit]

vīce f pl

  1. purgatory

Inflection[edit]

Feminine, a-stem
nominative více
genitive víc
plural
nominative více
accusative více
genitive víc
dative vícam
locative vícah
instrumental vícami

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

vice m or f (plural vice)

  1. vice (second in command)

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vice (not comparable)

  1. vice, second in rank, deputy, stand-in, acting

Related terms[edit]