vice

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Vice, viće, viče, více, vice-, and vicĕ

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

PIE word
*dwóh₁

From Middle English vice, from Old French vice, from Latin vitium (fault or blemish). Displaced native Old English unþēaw.

Noun[edit]

vice (plural vices)

  1. A bad habit.
    Pride is a vice, not a virtue.
    Smoking was a vice Sally picked up in high school.
    • 2008, BioWare, Mass Effect (Science Fiction), Redwood City: Electronic Arts, →ISBN, →OCLC, PC, scene: Noveria:
      Shepard: I wear a lot of hats, Mr. Vargas. Some days I shut down criminals. Some days I defuse nukes. Some days I like to enjoy private vices. You understand me?
    • 2015, Slayer (lyrics and music), “Vices”:
      It's a rush you can't deny / A little violence is the ultimate drug / Let's get high / You've been powerless to your vices / Self-control defies you
    • 2022 October 21, Taylor Swift and Jack Antonoff, “Anti-Hero”, in Midnights[1], performed by Taylor Swift:
      I should not be left to my own devices / they come with prices and vices / I end up in crisis / Tale as old as time
  1. (law) Any of various crimes related (depending on jurisdiction) to weapons, prostitution, pornography, gambling, alcohol, tobacco, or drugs.
  2. (law enforcement, slang) Clipping of vice squad.
  3. A defect in the temper or behaviour of a horse, such as to make the animal dangerous, to injure its health, or to diminish its usefulness.
    • 1839, From the case of Scholefield v. Robb Gilligan, Brenda (2002) Practical Horse Law[2], →ISBN: “So a horse with say, navicular disease, making him suitable only for light hacking, would probably be unsound, whereas rearing would be a vice, being a "defect in the temper... making it dangerous". A vice can however render a horse unsound - possibly a crib biter will damage its wind.”
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See vise.

Noun[edit]

vice (plural vices)

  1. (UK) Alternative spelling of vise (mechanical screw apparatus used for clamping)
  2. A tool for drawing lead into cames, or flat grooved rods, for casements.
  3. (architecture) A winding or spiral staircase.
  4. (obsolete) A grip or grasp.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

vice (third-person singular simple present vices, present participle vicing, simple past and past participle viced)

  1. Alternative spelling of vise (to hold or squeeze with a vice)

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin vice (in place of), ablative form of vicis. Compare French fois (time) and Spanish vez (time, turn).

Adjective[edit]

vice (not comparable)

  1. in place of; subordinate to; designating a person below another in rank
Derived terms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

vice

  1. (dated) instead of, in place of, versus (sense 2)
Usage notes[edit]
  • While rare in modern standard English, this usage still appears among members of the United States military. This usage is common in informal rail transport contexts in the United Kingdom.
  • Statements such as "vice Jones, who had resigned" may be abbreviated "vice Jones, resigned"

Noun[edit]

vice (plural vices)

  1. One who acts in place of a superior.
    • c. 1850s-1870s, Edward Minister and Son, The Gazette of Fashion and Cutting-Room Companion
      The health of the Vice was proposed in appropriate language; in replying, Mr. Marriott thanked the company []

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

vice

  1. in rows

Related terms[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Middle French vice, from Old French vice, borrowed from Latin vitium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vice m (plural vices)

  1. vice (clarification of this definition is needed)

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English vice-French vice-German vize-Italian vice-Russian ви́це- (více-)Spanish vice-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

vice

  1. instead, instead of

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Progreso III (in Ido), 1910–1911, page 102
  • Progreso IV (in Ido), 1911–1912, pages 211, 408, 409
  • Progreso V (in Ido), 1912–1913, page 723
  • Progreso VII (in Ido), 1914, page 130

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vicem.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈvi.t͡ʃe/
  • Rhymes: -itʃe
  • Hyphenation: vì‧ce

Noun[edit]

vice m or f by sense (invariable)

  1. deputy, substitute, vice

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vice

  1. ablative singular of vicis

Preposition[edit]

vice

  1. in place of, subordinate to
    vice alicuius fungorI deputise for someone

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: vice-
  • French: vice
  • German: vize-
  • Ido: vice
  • Italian: vice
  • Piedmontese: vice
  • Swedish: vice

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

vīce

  1. vocative singular of vīcus

References[edit]

  • vice”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • vice”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Dizionario Latino, Olivetti
  • vice in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French vice, visse, from Latin vitium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vice (plural vices)

  1. A fault or imperfection; a negative quality or attribute of something:
    1. A bad habit or tendency that one has; a negative human behaviour.
    2. A mistake; a fault due to deficience in knowledge or reasoning.
    3. (rare) An imperfection or blemish in one's visage or look.
  2. Vice, iniquity, sinful behaviour; absence of virtue or morality:
    1. A vice; a general tendency or action that is morally bad.
    2. A specific example of immoral or sinful behaviour.
  3. A sickness, disease or malady; a deleterious process effecting something.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French vice, borrowed from Latin vitium.

Noun[edit]

vice m (plural vices)

  1. vice (bad habit)

Descendants[edit]

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

vice m or f by sense (plural vices)

  1. used as an abbreviation of any word containing the prefix vice-

Slovene[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʋìːt͡sɛ/, /ʋíːt͡sɛ/

Noun[edit]

vīce f pl

  1. purgatory

Inflection[edit]

Feminine, a-stem
nominative více
genitive víc
plural
nominative
(imenovȃlnik)
více
genitive
(rodȋlnik)
dative
(dajȃlnik)
accusative
(tožȋlnik)
locative
(mẹ̑stnik)
vícah
instrumental
(orọ̑dnik)
vícami

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

vice m or f (plural vice)

  1. vice (second in command)

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vice (not comparable)

  1. vice, second in rank, deputy, stand-in, acting

Related terms[edit]

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English voys, from Anglo-Norman voiz, voys, veys, from Latin vōx.

Noun[edit]

vice

  1. voice

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 75