wale

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See also: Wale and walë

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

The noun is from Middle English wāle (planking, welt), from Old English walu (ridge, bank; rib, comb (of helmet); metal ridge on top of helmet; weal, mark of a blow), from Proto-Germanic *waluz (stick, root), from Proto-Indo-European *welʷ- (to turn, wind, roll). Akin to Low German wāle; Old Norse vala (knuckle). The verb is from late Middle English wālen, from the noun.

Noun[edit]

wale (plural wales)

  1. A ridge or low barrier.
  2. A raised rib in knit goods or fabric, especially corduroy. (As opposed to course).
    • 2008, Mary Lisa Gavenas, The Fairchild Encyclopedia of Menswear, page 99:
      The fabric may be further described according to the number of wales per inch: Corduroy known as fine wale, pin-wale, or needle wale has very thin wales (usually twelve or more per inch, i.e., the width of a pin), while wide wale corduroy has thicker wales (usually six or fewer per inch).
  3. The texture of a piece of fabric.
    • 1892, “Family Fashions and Fancies”, in Good Housekeeping, volume 14, page 85:
      Crepon cloths, with their heavy crape-like wale, are a noteworthy part of the season's importations.
  4. (nautical) A horizontal ridge or ledge on the outside planking of a wooden ship. (See gunwale, chainwale)
    • 1863, Andrew Murray, Ship-building in Iron and Wood, page 93:
      The strakes between the several ranges of ports, beginning from under the upper-deck ports of a three-decked ship in the royal navy, are called the channel wale, the middle wale, and the main wale.
  5. A horizontal timber used for supporting or retaining earth.
    • 1889 February 23, Architecture and Building: A Journal of Investment and Construction, volume 10, page 63:
      A few feet below the first wale another timber is inserted, likewise secured by struts.
  6. A timber bolted to a row of piles to secure them together and in position.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  7. A ridge on the outside of a horse collar.
    • 1976, Ralph Whitlock, Gentle giants: the past, present and future of the heavy horse, page 133:
      The wale is shaped to the size of the horse's neck, and then sewn together, with a flap, known as the 'barge', left free along one side. To this 'barge' the body of the collar is sewn.
  8. A ridge or streak produced on skin by a cane or whip.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)
    • 1854, S. W. Koelle, African Native Literature, Or Proverbs, Tales, Fables and Historical in the Kanuri Or Bornu Language:
      When the rat had looked at the toad's whole body, and not seen any wale of a stick, he said to the toad, "Brother toad, I have looked at thy whole body, and not seen any wale of a stick: thou art right."
    • 2018, Seabury Quinn, The Dark Angel: The Complete Tales of Jules de Grandin, Volume Three:
      I ran to her, and when I reached her I saw across the white skin of her shoulders the distinct wale of a whip.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

wale (third-person singular simple present wales, present participle waling, simple past and past participle waled)

  1. To strike the skin in such a way as to produce a wale or welt.
    • 1832, Owen Felltham, Resolves, Divine, Moral, Political:
      Would suffer his lazy rider to bestride his patie: back, with his hands and whip to wale his flesh, and with his heels to dig into his hungry bowels?
    • 2002, Hal Rothman, Neon Metropolis: How Las Vegas Started the Twenty-First Century:
      When faced with an adulthood that offered few options, grinding poverty and marriage to a man who drank too much and came home to wale on his own family or...no beatings.
  2. To give a surface a texture of wales or welts.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English wale, wal, from Old Norse val (choice), from Proto-Germanic *walą, *walō (desire, choice), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)welə- (to choose, wish). Akin to Old Norse velja (to choose), Old High German wala "choice" (German wählen "to choose"), Old English willan (to want). More at will.

Noun[edit]

wale (plural wales)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) Something selected as being the best, preference; choice.

Verb[edit]

wale (third-person singular simple present wales, present participle waling, simple past and past participle waled)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) To choose, select.
Alternative forms[edit]

References[edit]

  • wale at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • wale in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Anagrams[edit]


Fulniô[edit]

Noun[edit]

wale

  1. pig

References[edit]

  • 2009 (originally 1968), Douglas Meland, Doris Meland, Fulniô (Yahthe) Syntax Structure: Preliminary Version, Associação Internacional de Linguística - SIL Brasil, page 19.

Hawaiian[edit]

Noun[edit]

wale

  1. phlegm
  2. saliva

Particle[edit]

wale

  1. Used to modify the preceding word only, just, alone; quite, very; simply, for free, without reason

Middle Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

wāle

  1. Alternative form of wel

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English wealh, from Proto-Germanic *walhaz.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wale

  1. (rare) An outsider; a guest; one from an unfamiliar land.
  2. (rare) A thrall; a hireling.
Related terms[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English walu, from Proto-Germanic *waluz.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wale (plural wales)

  1. A wooden board used for creating the exterior of a vessel; planking.
  2. (rare) A welt; an injury created by use of a whip or a similar weapon.
  3. (rare) A lesion; a boil.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse val, from Proto-Germanic *walą, *walō.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wale

  1. A selection or possibility; a decision.
  2. (rare) A preference; something chosen due to its quality.
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Adjective[edit]

wale

  1. amazing, of great quality or talent.
  2. pleasing, nice, enjoyable, benevolent
  3. strong, firm, strengthy
  4. (negatively) impactful, grievous, melancholy
  5. (rare) decided, resolved, picked.
References[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old English wæl.

Noun[edit]

wale

  1. Alternative form of wal

Etymology 5[edit]

From wale (selection).

Verb[edit]

wale

  1. Alternative form of walen

North Frisian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

wale

  1. (Mooring Dialect) to want

Conjugation[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English wal, wale, from Old Norse val (choice), from Proto-Germanic *walą, *walō (desire, choice), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)welə- (to choose, wish). Akin to Old Norse velja (to choose), Old High German wala "choice" (German wählen "to choose"), Old English willan (to want).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wale (plural wales)

  1. choice, selection

Verb[edit]

wale (third-person singular present wales, present participle walin, past waled, past participle waled)

  1. to choose

Swahili[edit]

Adjective[edit]

wale

  1. Wa class inflected form of -le.