winken

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See also: Winken

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German winken, from Old High German winken, from Proto-Germanic *winkijaną (to move side to side, sway), alternative form of *winkōną, from Proto-Indo-European *weng- (to bow, bend, arch, curve). Compare wanken.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈvɪŋkŋ̩/, /ˈvɪŋkən/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

winken (third-person singular simple present winkt, past tense winkte, past participle gewunken or gewinkt, auxiliary haben)

  1. to wave
  2. to beckon

Usage notes[edit]

  • The originally weak verb started to develop alternative strong forms in Middle High German. These were long considered dialectal or colloquial, but the past participle gewunken has become standard and is increasingly replacing the now rarer gewinkt.[1][2]

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jacqueline Kubczak; Matthias Mösch (March 14, 2017), “Gewinkt oder gewunken? — Schwache oder starke Flexion”, in grammis 2.0[1] (in German)
  2. ^ “gewinkt,gewunken”, in Google Books Ngram Viewer[2], accessed January 8, 2018

Further reading[edit]


Low German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German winken, from Old Saxon winkōn, from Proto-Germanic *winkōną. See also wenken and wanken from the same root. Cognate with German winken, English wink, Dutch wenken.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈwɪŋkən/, /ˈvɪŋkən/

Verb[edit]

winken (past singular wunk, past participle wunken, auxiliary verb hebben)

  1. to wave
  2. to beckon

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]