wite

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English wīten ‎(to accuse, reproach, punish, suspect), Old English wītan ‎(to look, behold, see, guard, keep, impute or ascribe to, accuse, reproach, blame), derived from Old English wīte, see below.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

wite ‎(third-person singular simple present wites, present participle witing, simple past and past participle wited)

  1. (chiefly Scotland) To blame; regard as guilty, fault, accuse
    • Late 14th century, Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Wife of Bath's Tale’, Canterbury Tales:
      As help me God, I shal þee nevere smyte! / Þat I have doon, it is þyself to wyte.
  2. To reproach, censure, mulct
  3. To observe, keep, guard, preserve, protect

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English wītan ‎(guilt, blameworthiness, blame, wrongdoing, misdeed, offense, punishment, retribution, fine, bote, customary rent), from Old English wīte, see below.

Noun[edit]

wite ‎(plural wites)

  1. (obsolete outside Scotland) Blame, responsibility, guilt.
    • 1903, A. W. Pollard (ed.), Le Morte d'Arthur by Sir Thomas Malory (1485) , volume I, Bk. I, chapter XXVII:
      And so by fortune the ship drave unto a castle, and was all to-riven, and destroyed the most part []. So many lords and barons of this realm were displeased, for their children were so lost, and many put the wite on Merlin more than on Arthur; so what for dread and for love, they held their peace.
      1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book I, chapter xxiij:
      And so by fortune the shyp drofe vnto a castel and was al to ryuen and destroyed the most part []/ So many lordes and barons of this reame were displeasyd / for her children were so lost / and many put the wyte on Merlyn more than on Arthur / so what for drede and for loue they helde their pees
    • 1922, E. R. Eddison, The Worm Ouroboros, The Project Gutenberg, Australia:
      Nor I will not suffer mine indignation so to witwanton with fair justice as persuade me to put the wite on Witchland.
  2. Punishment, penalty, fine, bote, mulct.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old English witan

Verb[edit]

wite ‎(third-person singular simple present wites, present participle witing, simple past and past participle wited)

  1. (obsolete or poetic) To go, go away, depart, perish, vanish

References[edit]

  • Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Old Frisian wīte, Old Saxon wīti, Dutch wijte, Old High German wīzi, Old Norse víti.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wīte n (nominative plural wītu)

  1. punishment, torment, torture
    wíte wealdeþ. — He is the disposer of punishment. (He wields punishment.)
  2. plague, disease, evil, injury, pain
    Of ðam wíte gehǽled; — Healed of the disease.
  3. penalty, fine, bote: contribution, in money or food, to sustenance of king or his officers
  4. woe, misery, distress

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Scots[edit]

Verb[edit]

wite

  1. Alternative form of wyte

West Frisian[edit]

Verb[edit]

wite

  1. to know (a fact)

Conjugation[edit]

Infinitive: wite
Present tense Past tense
person singular plural singular plural
1st ik wyt wy wite ik wiet wy wieten
2nd do/dû wytst jimme wite do/dû wietst jimme wieten
3rd hy/sy wyt hja wite hy/sy wiet hja wieten
Present participle Imperative Auxiliary Past participle
witend (witende) wyt hawwe witen

Synonyms[edit]