wort

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See also: Wort, wòrt, and wört

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English wort, wurt, wyrte (plant), from Old English wyrt (herb, vegetable, plant, crop, root), from Proto-Germanic *wurtiz, from Proto-Indo-European *wréh₂ds. Doublet of root.

Noun[edit]

wort (plural worts)

  1. (archaic) A plant; herb; vegetable.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970:
      he drinks water, and lives on wort leaves, pulse, like a hogg, or scraps like a dog […].
    • 1673, Jeremy Taylor, Heniaytos: A Course of Sermons for All the Sundays of the Year []
      It is an excellent pleasure to be able to take pleasure in worts and water, in bread and onions, for then a man can never want pleasure when it is so ready for him, that nature hath spread it over all its provisions.
  2. Any of various plants or herbs, used in combination to refer to specific plants such as St. John's wort, or on its own as a generic term.
    • 2009, Victoria Zak, 20,000 Secrets of Tea, page 172:
      Two saints are credited with giving St. John’s wort its name. One was St. John of Jerusalem, who used the wort (plant) during the crusades to heal his knights’ battlefield wounds, and the other was John the Baptist.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

2008-09-20 Wort first run-off 2.jpg

From Middle English wort, worte (brewing wort), from Old English wyrt, wyrte (brewing wort, new beer, spice), from Proto-Germanic *wurtijō (spice), from Proto-Indo-European *wr̥h₂d- (sprout, root).

Cognate with Dutch wort (wort), German Würze (wort, seasoning, spice), Danish urt (beer wort), Swedish vört (beer wort).

Noun[edit]

wort (uncountable)

  1. (brewing) Liquid extract from the ground malt and grain soaked in hot water, the mash, as one of the steps in making beer.
    • 2004, Harold McGee, chapter 13, in On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen, Scribner, →ISBN:
      Making the wort with nothing but barley malt and hot water is the standard method in Germany, and in many U.S. microbreweries.
    • 2017, Jon C. Stott, Beer 101 North:
      While Robert and I were chatting generally about the craft brewing explosion, Piper arrived in the taproom. He didn't call her his “ale wife,” but it soon became apparent that she had “good wort cunning.”
Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Alemannic German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German wort. Cognate with German Wort, Dutch woord, English word, Icelandic orð.

Noun[edit]

wort n

  1. (Formazza) word

References[edit]

  • “wort” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch worte, from Old Dutch *wurta, from Proto-Germanic *wurtijō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wort n (uncountable)

  1. wort (unfermented beer)

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch wort

Noun[edit]

wort n or f

  1. word
  2. diction, what someone says or writes
  3. prescription, order

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: woord
  • Limburgish: waord, waordj

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English wyrt (plant, herb), from Proto-Germanic *wrōts (oblique stem *wurt-), from Proto-Indo-European *wréh₂ds. Doublet of rote (root).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wort (plural wortes or worten)

  1. A plant (not including trees, shrubs, etc.):
    • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey [et al.], transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎[1], published c. 1410, Matheu 13:31-32, page 6v, column 1; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
      An oþer parable iheſus puttide foꝛþ to hem. / ⁊ ſeide / þe kyngdom of heuenes is lijk to a coꝛn of ſeneuey · which a man took ⁊ ſewe in his feeld · / which is þe leeſt of alle ſeedis / but whanne it haþ woxen .· it is the mooſt of alle woꝛtis · ⁊ is maad a tre / ſo þe bꝛiddis of þe eir comen ⁊ dwellen in þe bowis þerof.
      Jesus put another parable forwards to them, saying: "The Kingdom of Heaven is like a mustard seed that a person took and sowed in their field; / it is the smallest of all seeds, but when it has grown, it is the largest of all plants; it becomes a tree, so the birds of the air come and nest in its branches."
    1. A plant that is wild or not cultivated or harvested.
    2. A plant that harvested or grown; often as a herb or vegetable.
    3. A plant employed for supposed curative or medical properties.
    4. A leaf as part of a salad or other vegetable dish.
Usage notes[edit]

This term is often used in compounds.

Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English wyrt, wyrte (wort), from Proto-Germanic *wurtijō.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wort (uncountable)

  1. Wort (as in brewing) or an analogous mixture (e.g. used for mead)
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Middle High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German wort.
The sense verb is a literal translation of Latin verbum.

Noun[edit]

wort n

  1. word
  2. (grammar) verb
    • 14th century, Heinrich von Mügeln. Normalised spellings: 1867, Karl Julis Schröer, Die Dichtungen Heinrichs von Mügeln (Mogelîn) nach den Handschriften besprochen, Wien, p. 476:
      Nam, vornam, wort, darnâch
      zûwort, teilfanc, zûfûg ich sach,
      vorsatz, înworf under irem dach
      gemunzet und geformet stân.

Descendants[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *word

Noun[edit]

wort n

  1. word

Inflection[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • wort”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *word, whence also Old Dutch wort, Old Saxon and Old English word, Old Norse orð, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌿𐍂𐌳 (waurd).
The sense verb is a literal translation of Latin verbum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wort n

  1. word
  2. (grammar) verb

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English wort

Noun[edit]

wort (uncountable)

  1. (Middle Scots) wort

References[edit]