wrength

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English wrength, from Old English *wrengþu (unevenness, wrongness, inequity), equivalent to wrong +‎ -th.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wrength (plural wrengths)

  1. The state or condition of being wrong; wrongness; wrongfulness; injustice.
    • 2012, Amber McRee Turner, Sway:
      "Dad," I said, "this isn't an in-between, is it?" "This isn't an in-between," He said. "Honestly, Cass, I'm at a loss for what to call this." "I know exactly what to call it," I said. "Wrength." "Wrength?" "Wrongness." In fact, the way I saw it, Mom had invented a whole new level of wrongness. A bad so bad that wrength might not even be capable of describing it. [...]"
    • 1905, Juvenile Nonfiction
      [...] Wrong is short-lived, and right must vanquish at length, If, scorning the wrong, we do others no wrength.
    • 1823, Ringan Gilhaize, The covenanters, by the author of Annals of the parish:
      Those who would exalt themselves by abetting the strength of the Godless, and the wrength of the oppressors.

Related terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English *wrengþu (wrongfulness), from Old English wrang (wrong), or formed in Middle English, from wrong on analogy with strength and length.

Noun[edit]

wrength (plural wrengths)

  1. The state or quality of being wrong, wrongfulness, injustice; crookedness; distortion.
    • c1220, Bestiary 85 in Old Eng. Misc. 3:
      Ðanne goð he to a ston, & he billeð ðer-on, Billeð til his bec biforn haueð ðe wrengðe forloren.

Descendants[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

1823, from wrang, wrong (wrong), formed on analogy with strength (from strong), length (from long) by R. Gilhaize Galt[1], or from Middle English wrength (wrongfulness). More at wrong.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wrength (plural wrengths)

  1. wrongfulness, injustice
    • 1905, Juvenile Nonfiction
      [...] Wrong is short-lived, and right must vanquish at length, If, scorning the wrong, we do others no wrength.
    • 1823, Ringan Gilhaize, The covenanters, by the author of Annals of the parish:
      Those who would exalt themselves by abetting the strength of the Godless, and the wrength of the oppressors.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • William Graham, The Scots Word Book, "injustice", 1980.
  • Notes:
  1. ^ Dictionary of the Scots Language, "wrength".