yerba

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English[edit]

A yerba bush

Etymology[edit]

From yerba mate.

Noun[edit]

yerba (usually uncountable, plural yerbas)

  1. Ilex paraguariensis, a species of holly native to southern South America; or the dried leaves and twigs of this plant, used to make the caffeine-rich beverage mate.
    • 1839, Charles Darwin, The Voyage of the Beagle[1]:
      The storehouses at Talcahuano had been burst open, and great bags of cotton, yerba, and other valuable merchandise were scattered on the shore.
    • 1854, P. L. Simmonds, The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom[2]:
      This was the place at which the leaves and small sprigs of the yerba tree, when brought from the woods, were first scorched--fire being set to the logs of wood within it.
    • 1910, Various, Argentina From A British Point Of View[3]:
      His preparations for breakfast are simple, and he is ready to start out after half an hour spent in imbibing a few mates full of yerba infusion.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

yerba f

  1. grass

References[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin herba.

Noun[edit]

yerba f (plural yerbes)

  1. grass

Istriot[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin herba.

Noun[edit]

yerba f

  1. grass

Papiamentu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish yerba and hierba.

Noun[edit]

yerba

  1. grass

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin herba, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰreH₁- (to grow, become green).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɟ͡ʝerba/, [ˈɟ͡ʝerβa]

Noun[edit]

yerba f (plural yerbas)

  1. yerba (Ilex paraguaiensis)
  2. Alternative form of hierba

Derived terms[edit]