Citations:Old Portuguese

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English citations of Old Portuguese

Adjective: of or pertaining to Old Portuguese language[edit]

  • 1942, Project Muse, Duke University, HighWire Press, Modern language quarterly[1], volume 3, University of Washington, page 157:
    In any case, it might have been helpful if the Old Portuguese words cited had been indicated as such in the text (not merely by reference to footnotes) and, as far as possible, given approximate dates (at least to the nearest century).
  • 1944, Quarterly review: A journal of university perspectives, volume 51, The Alumni Association of the University of Michigan., page 63:
    At Harvard, from 1903 on, Professor J. D. M. Ford offered an advanced course in Old Portuguese language and literature.
  • 1986, O. Harrassowitz, Mediterranean language review[2], volume 2, O. Harrassowitz, page 61:
    The diphtong ei was rare in the nuclear syllable of Old Portuguese verbs, with the i [j] usually traceable to a consonant: [...]
  • 1996, American Foreign Service Association, Foreign service journal, volume 73, American Foreign Service Association, page 68:
    We read the Old Portuguese words used to describe the dead: "Ban Aventurado" (dearly departed) and Anjinho (little angel).
  • 2000, Glanville Price, Encyclopedia of the languages of Europe, edition reprint, illustrated, Wiley-Blackwell, ISBN 9780631220398, page 367:
    A distinction is usually made between Old Portuguese (português antigo, português arcaico), referring to the period from the earliest texts to 1540, Classical Portuguese (1540-1850), and Modern Portuguese (1850 to the present). There is sometimes a further subdivision of the Old Portuguese period into a Galician-Portuguese period (origins to 1350), during which the linguistic and cultural unit of Galicia and Portugal remained strong, and the Old Portuguese period proper (1350-1540).

Proper noun: the ancestor of Modern Portuguese[edit]

  • 2000, Glanville Price, Encyclopedia of the languages of Europe, edition reprint, illustrated, Wiley-Blackwell, ISBN 9780631220398, page 367:
    A distinction is usually made between Old Portuguese (português antigo, português arcaico), referring to the period from the earliest texts to 1540, Classical Portuguese (1540-1850), and Modern Portuguese (1850 to the present). There is sometimes a further subdivision of Old Portuguese period into a Galician-Portuguese period (origins to 1350), during which the linguistic and cultural unit of Galicia and Portugal remained strong, and the Old Portuguese period proper (1350-1540).
  • 2001, Laurel J. Brinton, Historical linguistics 1999: selected papers from the 14th International Conference on Historical Linguistics, Vancouver, 9-13 August 1999, edition illustrated, John Benjamins Publishing Company, ISBN 9781588110640, page 218:
    The change from Old Portuguese to Modern Portuguese can be viewed as a movement of the inflected infinitive, born from the imperfect subjunctive, in the direction of the simple infinitive.
  • 2006, Raffaella Zanuttini, Crosslinguistic research in syntax and semantics: negation, tense, and clausal architecture, volume 2004, edition illustrated, Georgetown University Press, ISBN 9781589010802, page 81:
    Old Florentine, Old Venetian, and all the medieval varieties of southern Italy behave like Old Spanish and Old Portuguese and have obligatory enclisis if the verb appears immediately after a coordinating conjunction [...]. Old French, Old Piedmontese, and Old Lombard do not have obligatory enclisis in this context