Citations:hopak

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English citations of hopak and gopak

1886
1898
1903
1917
1921
1927
2006
ME « 15th c. 16th c. 17th c. 18th c. 19th c. 20th c. 21st c.
  • 1886, Nikolai Gogol, Isabel F. Hapgood transl., “St. John's Eve”.
    My grandfather's aunt used to tell how the maidens—in festive head-dresses of yellow, blue, and pink ribbons, above which they bound gold braid; in thin chemisettes embroidered on all the seams with red silk, and strewn with tiny silver flowers; in morocco shoes, with high iron heels—danced the gorlitza as swimmingly as peacocks, and as wildly as the whirlwind; how the youths—with their ship-shaped caps upon their heads, the crowns of gold brocade, and two horns projecting, one in front and another behind, of the very finest black lambskin; in tunics of the finest blue silk with red borders—stepped forward one by one, their arms akimbo in stately form, and executed the gopak; how the lads—in tall Cossack caps, and light cloth gaberdines, girt with silver embroidered belts, their short pipes in their teeth—skipped before them and talked nonsense.
  • 1898, Nikolai Gogol, Isabel F. Hapgood transl., “St. John's Eve”, in Stories by Foreign Authors: Russia, New York.
    My grandfather's aunt used to tell—what doings!—how the maidens—in festive head-dresses of yellow, blue, and pink ribbons, above which they bound gold braid; in thin chemisettes embroidered on all the seams with red silk, and strewn with tiny silver flowers; in morocco shoes, with high iron heels—danced the gorlitza as swimmingly as peacocks, and as wildly as the whirlwind; how the youths—with their ship-shaped caps upon their heads, the crowns of gold brocade, with a little slit at the nape where the hair-net peeped through, and two horns projecting, one in front and another behind, of the very finest black lambskin; in kuntushas of the finest blue silk with red borders—stepped forward one by one, their arms akimbo in stately form, and executed the gopak; how the lads—in tall Cossack caps, and light cloth svitkas, girt with silver embroidered belts, their short pipes in their teeth—skipped before them, and talked nonsense.
  • 1903, Nikolai Gogol, Edna Worthley Underwood and William Hamilton Cline transls., Evenings in Little Russia, Evanston, Ill.: William S. Lord.
    73: “But the Hopak* isn't danced this way. ...
    143: ... in crimson, who advanced in stately procession, their hands upon their hips, keeping time to the measure of the hopak; young men wearing the Cossack cap, their hips clasped by gorgeous ...
  • 1917, Montagu Montagu-Nathan, Moussorgsky, New York: Duffield.
    6: ... yet had an opportunity of hearing, of a few songs, and of some examples of symphonic music, such as the popular “Gopak.”
    29: Among them are the popular “Gopak” (to a text by the Ukrainian Shevchenko); “The Seminarist,” a song in the satirical vein, which portrays a theological student...
    54: The preserved fragments, one of them being the justly popular “Gopak,” have been edited by Lyadof and Karatigin.
  • 1921, Program, Detroit Symphony Orchestra.
    13: Hop! Hop! Hopak-dance! / Hop, Hop, gaily prance:
    14: Pit, pat, go the little slippers, / This is merry market-day! / Hip, Hop, Hopak-dance! / Hi! Ho! Market-day! / Pit, pat, little slippers!
  • 1927, Albert Rhys Wiliams ed., “The Bolshevist Boy Scouts”, in The Russian Land, New York: New Republic.
    150: ... song that closed each verse with a shout of Slava! Slava! Glory! Glory! Followed the “Hopak” and “Snowstorm,” danced to the ...
    160: Another defaulter dances the “Hopak.”
  • 2006, Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day, Vintage 2007, p. 1213:
    Somewhere an accordion was playing a jazz-inflected hopak.