Talk:comeuppance

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Wikipedia:comeuppance authors and history[edit]

RFV[edit]

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The following discussion has been moved from Wiktionary:Requests for verification.

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Rfv-sense: "An outcome which is justly deserved (good or bad)."

Easily attestable, except that the definition states the outcome may be good or bad. Is it ever used in the "good" sense? Note this is a wotd nomination. — Pingkudimmi 10:27, 1 March 2011 (UTC)

  • Well, I have never seen it used in a "good" way. The OED agrees, but says that its synonym is deserts (which can be good or bad). So it's a definite maybe. SemperBlotto 22:34, 1 March 2011 (UTC)
I searched for "[hope] for his{{|}}etc coomeuppance" and only got quotes like:
Searches for "good{{|}}better{{|}}best comeuppance" yield a sense of "good{{|}}better{{|}}best" that means something like "thorough".
My expectation is that it is almost exclusively negative, with the exceptions based on error or meant in humor. DCDuring TALK 23:12, 1 March 2011 (UTC)
Most OneLook dictionaries have it as exclusively negative. Many have "deserts" as exclusively or usually negative. DCDuring TALK 23:21, 1 March 2011 (UTC)
So how do we handle this? In the definition, in the usage notes, or perhaps both? — Pingkudimmi 09:52, 3 March 2011 (UTC)
Not sure. Not having seen a single instance of usage with a positive outcome, I am not inclined to credit the more weaselly definitions that have a "usually" or "especially". BTW, the etymology is from come up (before a judge), rarely a positive experience. This needs to get citations of any negative-outcome usage over the next four weeks. If it is scheduled for WOTD before then, it should be removed. DCDuring TALK 12:48, 3 March 2011 (UTC)
Discussion acted on. — Pingkudimmi 17:29, 2 May 2011 (UTC)