User:Visviva/Medical/By links/S

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  1. saburral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      saburral (sab-ur'-al) [saburra]. I. Pertaining to or affected with saburra. 2. Resembling or pertaining to coarse sand.
  2. safrene - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      safrene (saf-ren) [saffron], CioHi*. A hydrocarbon obtained from sassafras.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      safrene (saf'rfn). A hydrocarbon, C1DH,,, obtained from sassafras.
  3. salicyl - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      salicyl (sal'is-il). The supposed radical. < '.n.ii.. of salicylic acid. s. salicylic acid, diplosal.
  4. salivator - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      salivator (sal'-iv-a-tor) [salivate]. An agent causing salivation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      salivator (sal'iv-a-tor). An agent which salivntrv
  5. salol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      salol (sal'-ol) [salix, willow]. See pheny salicylate. s., camphorated, a mixture of 75 % of phenyl salicylate with 25 % of camphor; an oily liquid, soluble in alcohol, ether, chloroform, or oils, a local anesthetic, antiseptic, and analgesic. Dose 3-10 gr. (0.2-0.65 Gm.). Syn., camphor salol. t. tribromide, CtHi. OH . COO . CiHjBrj. a white, odorless, tasteless powder, freely soluble in chloroform and glacial acetic acid, insoluble in ether, or alcohol. It is a
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sal'ol (Br.). Phenylis salicylas (U.S.). sal'ol-cam'phor. A yellowish oily liquid obtained by heating 3 parts of salol with 2 parts of camphor; local anesthetic; analgesic and antiseptic in doses of gr. 3-8 (o. 2-0.5).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      salol (sa'lol). i. Phenyl salicylate, C^HuA = C,H,OH.COO.C,H5, a white, crystalline powder, nearly insoluble in water, but soluble in chloroform, ether, oils, and in 10 parts of alcohol. It is split up in the intestine into salicylic acid and phenol. It is an antirheumatic, antiseptic, and antipyretic, and is used in neuralgia and rheumatism, in jaundice, and in gonorrhea to sterilize the bladder contents. Dose, 5-15 gr. (0.333i gm.). i. Any one of that group of the esters of salicylic acid to which normal salol belongs. a.-camphor, a compound of 3 parts of salol and i part of camphor, forming a colorless, oily liquid: used as a local antiseptic. B. chloral, an oily liquid, a compound of salol and hydrated chloral, used as a hypnotic and antiseptic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sal'ol (Br.). Phenylis salicylas (U.S.). sal'ol-cam'phor. A yellowish oily liquid obtained by heating 3 parts of salol with 2 parts of camphor; local anesthetic; analgesic and antiseptic in doses of gr. 3-8 (o. 2-0.5).
  6. salophen - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      salophen (sal'-o-fen) [salix, willow], C«Hi. OH . COi. C,H4. NHCdHaO) =CuHiiNO«. Acetylparamidophenyl salicylate, a crystalline substance containing 50 % of salicylic acid, and used as a substitute for the latter, and as an intestinal antiseptic. Dose 15 gr. (t Gm.).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      salophen (sal'o-fen). Acetylpara-amidb
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      salophen (sal'o-fen). Acetyl paramidol, CeHi
  7. salpingectomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      salpingectomy (sal-pin-jek'-to-me) [sclpinx; &cto/iij, excision]. Excision of a Fallopian tube.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      salpingectomy (sal-pin-jek'to-me). Excision of the oviduct. [Gr., salpigx, a trumpet, -f- ektemnein, to cut out.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      salpingectomy (sal-pin-jek'to-me) [Gr. tube + tKTOpii excision]. Surgical removal of an oviduct.
  8. salpingopharyngeus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      salpingopharyngeus (sal-ping-go-far-4n-je'-us) [salpingo-; pharynx}. A muscular bundle passing from the Eustachian tube downward to the constrictors of the pharynx.
  9. salufer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      salufer (sal'-u-fer). Sodium ailicofluoride.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sal'ufer [L. salus, health, + ferre, to bring.] Sodium silicofluoride, sodium fluosilicate, NasSiFl,; a tasteless, odorless powder, employed as a deodorant, antiseptic, and styptic, in 1-500 to 1-5000 solution.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      salufer (sal'u-fer) [L. sa'lus health + fer're to bring]. An antiseptic and astringent solution of sodium silicofiuorid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sal'ufer [L. salus, health, + ferre, to bring.] Sodium silicofluoride, sodium fluosilicate, NasSiFl,; a tasteless, odorless powder, employed as a deodorant, antiseptic, and styptic, in 1-500 to 1-5000 solution.
  10. salumin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      salumin (sal'-u-min). See aluminum salicylaU. s., soluble, ammoniated aluminum salicylate.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      salumin (sal'u-min). Aluminum salicylate. AKC,l((i) a reddish powder, used as an astringent and disinfectant in rhinitis and pharyngitis, insoluble s,, pure salumin in powder: used in nasal and throat diseases, soluble 8., salumin rendered soluble by ammonia, and used in a solution.
  11. salvatella - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      salvatella (sal-vat-el'-ah) or vena salvatella [salvatus, from salvare, to save]. The vein on the back of the little finger. See vein.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      salvatell'a [It.; L. salvare, to save.] The dorsal vein of the little finger, bleeding from which was anciently regarded as curative in melancholia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      salvatella (sal-vat-el'ah) [L.]. A small vein of the little finger and dorsum of the hand.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      salvatell'a [It.; L. salvare, to save.] The dorsal vein of the little finger, bleeding from which was anciently regarded as curative in melancholia.
  12. salviol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      salviol (w{'-ir-t>/) [salvia, sage; oleum, oil], CioHiiO. A liquid substance obtained from oil of sage.
  13. sand-fly - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sand-fly (sand'fli). See PUebotomus papatassU. Sand Strom's bodies (zant-strimz) [J. Sandstr'om,
  14. sangaree - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sangaree (sang-ga-re') [Sp., sangria]. A sweetened and flavored drink, consisting essentially of diluted wine or porter.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sangaree (sang-gah-re') [Sp. sangria.] A beverage made of sweetened water, red wine, and nutmeg.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sangaree (sang-gah-re') [Sp. sangria.] A beverage made of sweetened water, red wine, and nutmeg.
  15. sanguicolous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sanguicolous (sang-gwik'-o-lus) [sanguis, blood; colere, to inhabit]. Living in the blood, as a parasite.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sanguicolous (sang-wik'o-lus) [L. san'guis blood + col'lerc to dwell]. Inhabiting or living in the blood.
  16. sanguiferous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sanguiferous (san-gwif-er-us) [sanguis, blood; ferre, to carry]. Carrying, or conveying, blood.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sanguiferous (sang-gwif'er-us) [L. sanguis, blood, + jerre, to carry.] Conveying blood, circulatory.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sanguiferous (sang-wifer-us) [L. san'guis blood + ler're to bear]. Conveying or containing blood.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sanguiferous (sang-gwif'er-us) [L. sanguis, blood, + jerre, to carry.] Conveying blood, circulatory.
  17. sanguification - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sanguification (sang-gwif-ik-a'-shun) [sanguis. blood; facere, to make], i. The formation of blood. 2. Conversion into blood, as the sanguification of substances absorbed from the intestinal tract.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sanguification (sang"wif-ik-a'shun) [L. san'guis blood + fa'cere to make]. The process of making blood; also conversion into blood.
  18. sanguinarine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sanguinarine (sang-gwin'-ar-in'), CuHuNOi, the most important alkaloid derived from the rhizome of Sanguinaria canadensis. Dose rV~4~l Sr- (0.0050.011-0.05 Gm.) in solution. Small doses expectorant, large doses emetic, s. nitrate, CnHuNOi. HNOj, a red, crystalline powder, soluble in water and alcohol. Dosage and uses the same as the alkaloid. s. sulphate, (CnHuNOOa. HaSOt, red crystalline powder, soluble in water and alcohol. Dosage and uses the same as the alkaloid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sanguin'arine. A poisonous alkaloid from sanguinaria, employed as a tonic and expectorant in doses of gr. -jV-J (0.005-0.008).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sanguin'arine. A poisonous alkaloid from sanguinaria, employed as a tonic and expectorant in doses of gr. -jV-J (0.005-0.008).
  19. sanguinolent - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sanguinolent (sang-gvtin'-o-lent) [sanguis]. Tinged with blood.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sanguin'olent. Bloody, tinged with blood.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sanguinolent (sang-win'o-lent) [L. sanguiaolen'.'.-< .1 Of a bloody tinge.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sanguin'olent. Bloody, tinged with blood.
  20. santalol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      santalol (san'-tal-ol), CuH«O. A constituent of oil of santal found by Chapoteau.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      santalol (san'ta-lol). A liquid constituting at least 90 per cent, of oil of sandal of the U. S. Ph.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      santalol (san'tal-ol). A compound, C,,H»O. found in oil of sandalwood.
  21. santalum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      santalum (san'-tal-um) [L.]. Pterocarpi lignum (B. P.). White sandalwood. The wood of a species of 5. album and S. citrinum, or yellow sandalwood.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      san'talum. Sandalwood, santal. a. al'bum (N.F.), white sandalwood, see oleum santali. s. ru'brum (U.S.), red saunders, red sandalwood, pterocarpi lignum, the heart-wood of Pterocarpus santalinus, a small tree of India; employed in pharmacy as a coloring agent.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      santalum (san'tal-um). See sandalviood.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      san'talum. Sandalwood, santal. a. al'bum (N.F.), white sandalwood, see oleum santali. s. ru'brum (U.S.), red saunders, red sandalwood, pterocarpi lignum, the heart-wood of Pterocarpus santalinus, a small tree of India; employed in pharmacy as a coloring agent.
  22. santol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      santol (san'-tol). i. A crystalline substance CiHtOi. found by H. Weidel (1870) in white sandalwood. 2. A proprietary preparation of sandalwood, used for gonorrhea, etc.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      san'tol. Trade name of a sandalwood preparation, used in gonorrhea.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      santol (san'tol). i. A coloriess, crystalline principle, C»HjOj, from red saunders. i. A proprietary sandalwood preparation for gonorrhea, etc.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      san'tol. Trade name of a sandalwood preparation, used in gonorrhea.
  23. santonica - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      santon'ica [G. santonikon, wormwood.] Levant wormwood, semen-contra, the unexpanded flower heads of Artemisia paucifolia, a shrub growing in Turkestan; formerly employed for the expulsion of round worms, in doses of gr. 10-30 (0.6—2.0); now superseded by the active principle santonin.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      santonica (san-ton'ik-ah). Wormseed; the minute unopened flower heads of Artemisia cina, Artemisia contra, Artemisia vahliana, Artemisia maritima, Artemisia pauciflora [U. S. Ph.], and of various other species of Artemisia. It is used, chiefly in the form of its peculiar principle (santonin), as an anthelmintic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      santonica (san-ton'ik-ah) [L.]. Levant wormseed, or cina; the dried flower-heads of Artemis'ia marifima. Santonica contains santonin, and is used as a vermifuge, especially for seat-worms and round-worms, and for incontinence of urine. In large doses it is mydriatic and diuretic. Overdoses may cause convulsions and vertigo, and give a yellow or pinkish tint to objects seen. Dose, 5-30 gr. (0.33-2 gm.); of fluidextract, 15-60 min. (1-4 c.c.). The Irofhis'ci sanloni'ni contain i gr. of santonin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      santon'ica [G. santonikon, wormwood.] Levant wormwood, semen-contra, the unexpanded flower heads of Artemisia paucifolia, a shrub growing in Turkestan; formerly employed for the expulsion of round worms, in doses of gr. 10-30 (0.6—2.0); now superseded by the active principle santonin.
  24. santonin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      santonin (san'-to-nin). See under santonica. s., troches of (trochisci santonini, U. S. P., B. P.), those of the U. S. P. contain each about \ gr. (0.033 Gm.) of santonin; those of the B. P. contain i gr. (0.065 Gm.) of the drug.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      santonin (san'to-nin). A substance, Gb-hisOa, obtained from wormseed. It is anthelmintic [santoninum, U. S. Ph., Br. Ph.]. calcium s. A tasteless powder, CnHisOa, CaHO, used as a vermifuge, troclilsci .santonin!. Each lozenge contains Yi grain of s. [U. S. Ph.].
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      santonin (san'to-nin) [L. nioni'num]. A colorless, crystalline, and poisonous active principle. C1SH15O:1, from santonica. It is used as a vermifuge like santonica. Dose, 1-4 gr. (0.066-0.206 gm.).
  25. saphena - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      saphena (sa-fe'-nah) [00.^1^1, manifest: pi., sapkcna\. A name given two large veins of the leg—the internal or long, and the external, or short saphena.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      saphe'na [G. saphene's, visible.] See under vena.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      saphe'na. Either of two large superficial veins of the leg.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      saphe'na [G. saphene's, visible.] See under vena.
  26. sapotoxin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sapotoxin (sap-o-toks'-in) [sapo; rafter. poison], CVH Mdo. A poisonous glucoside obtained from
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sapotox'in. A glucoside from quillaia, or soapbark.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sapotoxin (sa-po-toks'in) [L. sa'po soap + toxin]. A poisonous glucosid, C17H,,O10> found in soapbark (quillaia).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sapotox'in. A glucoside from quillaia, or soapbark.
  27. sapremia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sapremia. sapraemia (sap-rem'-e-ah) [crarpfo, putrid; oT/*o, blood]. The intoxication produced by absorp* tion of the results of putrefaction.
  28. saprine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      saprine (sap'-rin) (oa-rpbi, putrid]. A nonpoisonous ptomaine formed in the putrefaction of animal tissues.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sap'rine. A ptomaine from the putrefying abdominal viscera.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sap'rine. A ptomaine from the putrefying abdominal viscera.
  29. saprol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      saprol (sap'-rol) [o-aTpfe. putrid]. A mixture of crude cresols with hydrocarbons; used as a disinfectant.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sap'rol. A disinfectant mixture of cresols in mineral oil.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      saprol (sap'rol). A dark brown oily compound containing phenol, creosol, and other coal-tar products; used as a disinfectant. [Gr., sapros, putrid.] Saprolegnla (sap-ro-leg'ne-ah). A genus of phycomycetous fungi, which are partly saprophylic in their nature. S. fcrax. A variety of s. which destroys certain kinds of water animals. [Gr., sapros, putrid, + legnon, border.] saprophilotis (sap-rof'il-us). Living on deaq or decaying matter. [Gr., sapros, putrid, + philein, to love.] saprophyte (sap'ro-fit). A plant that derives its sustenance from decomposing organic substances, as opposed to a parasite living in or on a living host. The term is especially applied to bacteria. facultative s's. Bacteria which may develop either as parasites or as s's. IGr., sapros, putrid, + phyton, a plant.] saprophytlc (sap-ro-fit'ik). Of animals or plants, obtaining their nutrition from dead organisms.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      saprol (sa'prol). A dark-brown, inflammable, oily mixture of 40 per cent, of crude cresols in hydrocarbons from petroleum: disinfectant.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sap'rol. A disinfectant mixture of cresols in mineral oil.
  30. sarcine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sarcine (sar'-sen), i. See hypoxanthine. a. Sarcina, q. v.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sar'cine. i. Hypoxanthin. 3 A packet of cocci of the genus Sarcina.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sarcine (sar'sin) [L. sarci'na pack]. A cube composed of eight bacterial cells (sarcine of the first power), or of sixty-four cells (sarcine of the second power), produced by the division of certain cocci.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sar'cine. i. Hypoxanthin. 3 A packet of cocci of the genus Sarcina.
  31. sarco- - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sarco- (sar-ko-) [ffApf, flesh]. A prefix denoting composed of or pertaining to flesh.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sarco- [G. sarx(sark-), flesh.] A prefix denoting muscular substance or a resemblance to :Wn.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sarco-. Combining form of Gr., sarx, sarkos, flesh.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sarco- [Gr. <rdp£ flesh]. A prefix denoting relation to flesh.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sarco- [G. sarx(sark-), flesh.] A prefix denoting muscular substance or a resemblance to :Wn.
  32. sarcocarp - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sarcocarp (sar'-ko-karff) [sarco-; jcoproc, fruit]. In biology, a fleshy, succulent mesocarp.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sar'cocarp [G. sarx(sark-), flesh, + karpas, frail,' Mesocarp.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sar'cocarp [G. sarx(sark-), flesh, + karpas, frail,' Mesocarp.
  33. sarcocele - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sarcocele (sar'-ko-sSl) [sarco-; *^Xij, a tumor]. Any fleshy swelling of the testicle. B. malleosa, that due to Bacillus mallei. B., syphilitic, syphilitic orchitia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sarcocele (sar'ko-sel) [G. sarx(sark-), flesh, + km. hernia, tumor.] A fleshy tumor or sarcoma o: the testicle.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sarcocele (sar'ko-sel). A fleshy tumor of the testicle. [Gr., sarx, flesh, + kele, tumor.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sarcocele (sar'ko-sel) [Gr. K^xtj tumor). Any fleshy swelling or tumor of the testicle
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sarcocele (sar'ko-sel) [G. sarx(sark-), flesh, + km. hernia, tumor.] A fleshy tumor or sarcoma o: the testicle.
  34. sarcomatosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sarcomatosis (sar-ko-mat-o'-sis) [sarcoma]. The formation of multiple sarcomatous growths in various parts of the body. s. generalis. Synonym of grunuloma fungoides.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sarcomato'sis. The occurrence of several sarcomatous growths on different parts of the body. a. genera'lis, mycosis fungoides.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sarcomato'sis. The occurrence of several sarcomatous growths on different parts of the body. a. genera'lis, mycosis fungoides.
  35. sarcomatous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sarcomatous (sar-ko'-mat-us) [sarcoma]. Of the nature of or resembling sarcoma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sarco'matous [L. sarcomatosum.] Relating to or of the nature of sarcoma.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sarcomatous (sar-ko'mat-us). i. FlesSr. succulent. 2. Having the characters ct sarcoma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sarcomatous (sar-ko'mat-us). Pertaining to or
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sarco'matous [L. sarcomatosum.] Relating to or of the nature of sarcoma.
  36. sarcosporidiosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sarcosporidio'sis. Infection of the voluntary muscles with sarcosporidia, causing Miescher's tubes in the mouse and Rainey's corpuscles in the pig. The affection is rare in man.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sarcosporidiosis (sar"ko-spo-rid-e-o'sis). The condition of being infected with Sarcosporidia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sarcosporidio'sis. Infection of the voluntary muscles with sarcosporidia, causing Miescher's tubes in the mouse and Rainey's corpuscles in the pig. The affection is rare in man.
  37. sarcotherapy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sar"cother'apy [G. sarx(sark-), flesh. + therapeia, treatment.] Zomotherapy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sarcotherapy (sar-ko-ther'ap-e). Sarcotherapeutics.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sar"cother'apy [G. sarx(sark-), flesh. + therapeia, treatment.] Zomotherapy.
  38. sarcotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sarcotic (sar-kot'-ik) [tripf, flesh]. Pertaining to. or causing fleshy formation or sarcosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sarcot'ic. i. Relating to sarcosis. 2. Causing an increase of flesh.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sarcotic (sar-kot'ik) [Gr. aapfcuruci;]. Promoting the growth of flesh.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sarcot'ic. i. Relating to sarcosis. 2. Causing an increase of flesh.
  39. sarcous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sarcous (sar'-kus) [flesh]. Pertaining to flesh or muscle, s. element, one of the dark prisms of the ultimate fibrils of striped muscle -fibers, s, substance, the substance of a sarcous element.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sar'cous [G. sarx(sark-), flesh.] Relating to muscular tissue; muscular, fleshy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sarcous (sar'kus) [Gr. adp{, <7ap«6j flesh). Pertaining to flesh or to muscular tissues.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sar'cous [G. sarx(sark-), flesh.] Relating to muscular tissue; muscular, fleshy.
  40. sarsa - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sarsa (sar'-sah). Same as sarsaparilla.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sar'sa. Sarsaparilla.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sar'sa. Sarsaparilla.
  41. satellitosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      satellitosis (sal-tl-i-to'-sis). A condition in which there is an accumulation of free nuclei around the ganglion cells of the cortex of the brain; it is found in general paralysis and other affections. •
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      satellito'sis [L. satelles(satellii-), an attendant, + G. -osis.] A condition marked by an accumulation of free nuclei, probably neuroglia nuclei, around the neurons or ganglion cells of the cerebral cortex; it is present in general paresis and certain other affections.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      satellitosis (sat-el-i-to'sis). Accumulation of free nuclei about the ganglion-cells of the brain-cortex: seen in general paralysis, etc.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      satellito'sis [L. satelles(satellii-), an attendant, + G. -osis.] A condition marked by an accumulation of free nuclei, probably neuroglia nuclei, around the neurons or ganglion cells of the cerebral cortex; it is present in general paresis and certain other affections.
  42. satyromania - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      satyromania (sat-ir-o-ma'-ne-ah). Same as satyriasis (i).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      satyromania (sat"ir-o-ma'nl-ah) [G. satyros, satyr, + mania, frenzy.] Satyriasis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      satyromania (sat"ir-o-ma'ne-ah) [Gr. aarvpot satyr -\-uavla madness]. Same as satyriasis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      satyromania (sat"ir-o-ma'nl-ah) [G. satyros, satyr, + mania, frenzy.] Satyriasis.
  43. saunders - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      saunders (sawn'-derz). See sandal-wood.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      saunders (sawn'durz). Sandalwood, santalum.*
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      saunders (sawn'durz). Sandalwood, santalum.*
  44. sauriosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sauriosis (saw-re-o'-sis) [vaiipa, lizard]. Ichthyosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      saurio'sis. Saurodermia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      saurio'sis. Saurodermia.
  45. sauroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sauroid (saw'roid) [Gr. aavpot lizard + flSm form). Resembling a reptile. B. cell or Stage. See normoblast.
  46. saxifragant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      saxifragant (saks-if'-raR-ant) [saxum, a stone; frangere, to breakj. Having the power of dissolving or breaking up calculi. •
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      saxifragant (saks-if'ra-gant) [L. saxum stone, + frangere, to break.] Lithotritic, possessing the power of dissolving or of crushing calculi.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      saxifragant (saks-if'ra-gant) [L. saxum stone, + frangere, to break.] Lithotritic, possessing the power of dissolving or of crushing calculi.
  47. scabiophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scabiophobia (ska-be-o-fo'-be-ah) [scabies, itch; $6{lof, fear]. Morbid or insane fear of scabies.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scabiophobia (ska"be-o-fo'bc-ah) [scabies + Or. fear]. Morbid fear of scabies.
  48. scabious - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scabious (ska'-be-us) [scabiosus, rough, scabby]. l. Scabby or scaly. 2. As a noun, a plant of the genus Scabiosa; popularly regarded as useful in skin diseases and gout, and as a vulnerary.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sca'bious. -i. Relating to or suffering from scabies. 2. Erigeron.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sca'bious. -i. Relating to or suffering from scabies. 2. Erigeron.
  49. scalenus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scalenus (skc-ic'-nus). See muscles, table of.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scale'nus. See under musculus.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      scalenus (ska-Ie'nus). An oblique muxis with unequal sides. See table of ***■ cles, under muscle. [Gr., skalenos, oneven.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scalenus (ska-le'nus) [L.; Gr. ana^vcn uneven). See muscles, table of.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scale'nus. See under musculus.
  50. scalpriform - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scalpriform (skal'pri-form) [L. scalprum, chisel, + forma, shape.] Like a chisel, s. inci'sors, the cutting or gnawing incisors of a rodent.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scalpriform (skal'pri-form) [L. scalprum, chisel, + forma, shape.] Like a chisel, s. inci'sors, the cutting or gnawing incisors of a rodent.
  51. scalprum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scalprum (skal'-prum) [scalpere, to scrape]. • I. A toothed raspatory used in trephining and in removing carious bone. 2. A strong and large scalpel.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scalprum (skal'prum) [L. " knife "I A raspttory; also a strong knife.
  52. scammonium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scammonium (skam-o'-ne-um). See scammony.
  53. scaphocephalic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scaphocephalic (ska"fo-sef-al'ik) [Gr. anivfit boat + «va\j7 head]. Having a keeled, or boatshaped, head.
  54. scaphocephalous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scaphoceph'alous. Scaphocephalic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scaphocephalous (ska-fo-sef'al-us). Same as scaphocephalic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scaphoceph'alous. Scaphocephalic.
  55. scapulary - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scapulary (skap'-u-la-re). A bifurcated bandage, the two ends of which pass over the shoulders, while the single end passes down the back, all three being fastened to a body-bandage.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scap'ulary. A form of brace or suspender for keeping a belt or body bandage in place; it is made of a broad roller bandage split half way, the undivided part being in front, the divided ends passing over the shoulders and down the back.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scapulary (skap'u-la-re). A shoulder bandage,
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scap'ulary. A form of brace or suspender for keeping a belt or body bandage in place; it is made of a broad roller bandage split half way, the undivided part being in front, the divided ends passing over the shoulders and down the back.
  56. scapuloclavicular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scapuloclavicular (skap-u-lo-kla-tik'-u £Pertaining to the scapula and the clavicle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scapuloclavic'ular. Noting the articulation between the scapula and clavicle; acromioclavicular.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scapuloclavicular (skap"u-lo-klav-ik'u-lar). Pertaining to the scapula and the clavicle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scapuloclavic'ular. Noting the articulation between the scapula and clavicle; acromioclavicular.
  57. scapulohumeral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scapulohu'meral. Relating to both scapula and humerus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scapulohumeral (skap"u-lo-hu'mer-al). Pertaining to the scapula and the humerus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scapulohu'meral. Relating to both scapula and humerus.
  58. scapus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scapus (ska'-pus) [L.: pi., scapi]. A stem, shaft, s. penis, the body of the penis, s. pili, the hairshaft.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sca'pus [L. shaft, stalk.] The shaft or stem of the hair. It consists of cuticle, a fine layer of overlapping scales; cortex, the body of the hair made up of closely packed elongated fusiform cells, resembling fibers, containing pigment and sometimes air spaces; medulla, present only in the coarser hairs, a core of polyhedral nucleated cells, containing pigment, air spaces, and fat granules.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scapus (ska'pus) |L. "shaft"]. The shaft of the hair.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sca'pus [L. shaft, stalk.] The shaft or stem of the hair. It consists of cuticle, a fine layer of overlapping scales; cortex, the body of the hair made up of closely packed elongated fusiform cells, resembling fibers, containing pigment and sometimes air spaces; medulla, present only in the coarser hairs, a core of polyhedral nucleated cells, containing pigment, air spaces, and fat granules.
  59. scarf-skin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scarf-skin (skarf'skin). The cuticle, or epidermis. See skin.
  60. scarfskin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scarf'skin [A.S. scearfe, fragment, scraping.] Epidermis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scarf'skin [A.S. scearfe, fragment, scraping.] Epidermis.
  61. scarificator - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scarificator (skar'-if-ik-a-lor} [scarify]. An instrument used in scarification, consisting of a number of small lancets operated by a spring.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scar'ificator. An instrument for scarifying; it consists of a number of concealed cutting blades, set near together, which are projected at will by a spring.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scar'ificator. An instrument for scarifying; it consists of a number of concealed cutting blades, set near together, which are projected at will by a spring.
  62. scarlatiniform - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scarlatiniform (skor-lal-in'-if-orm). Synonym of scarlatinoid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scarlatin'iform [L. scarlatina + forma, form.] Resembling scarlatina, noting a rash.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scarlatin'iform [L. scarlatina + forma, form.] Resembling scarlatina, noting a rash.
  63. scatoscopy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scatoscopy (ska-las'-ko-pe) [""P. »«ht.'i. dung; aunrur. to inspect]. Inspection of the excreta.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scatos'copy [G. skor(skat-), excrement, + skopeo, I examine.] Examination of the feces for purposes of diagnosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scatos'copy [G. skor(skat-), excrement, + skopeo, I examine.] Examination of the feces for purposes of diagnosis.
  64. schistocytosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      schistocytosis (skis-to-si-to'-sis) [schistocyte]. i. An aggregation of schistocytesin the blood. 2. The splitting process of blood-corpuscles.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      schistocytosis (skis-to-si-to'sis). The occurrence of many schistocytes in the blood.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      schistocytosis (skis-to-si-to'sis). The occurrence of many schistocytes in the blood.
  65. schizogenesis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      schizogenesis (skiz-o-jen'-es-is) [schiso-; -,f»'«m, production]. Reproduction by fission.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      schizogenesis (skiz-o-jen'e-sis) [schizd, I split, + genesis.] Multiplication of cells by fission, scissiparity, fissiparity.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      schizogenesis (skiz-o-jen'e-sis) [schizd, I split, + genesis.] Multiplication of cells by fission, scissiparity, fissiparity.
  66. schwelle - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      schwelle (shvcl'-ch) [Ger., "threshold"]. The threshold, or limen, of any sensation; nerve-excitation which just fails of producing a sensation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      schwelle (shvel'eh) [G.] Threshold.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      schwelle (shvel'eh) [G.] Threshold.
  67. sciage - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sciage (sc'-ahzj) [Fr., "sawing"]. A to-and-frosawing movement in massage, practised with the ulnar border, or with the dorsum of the hand.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sciage (se-azh') [Fr. scie, saw.] A to-and-fro sawlike movement of the hand in massage.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sciage (se-azh') [Fr. scie, saw.] A to-and-fro sawlike movement of the hand in massage.
  68. scillitin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scillitin (sill-tin). A brownish amorphous glucoside from squill, diuretic in doses of gr. j^-J (0.003-0.015).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scillitin (sill-tin). A brownish amorphous glucoside from squill, diuretic in doses of gr. j^-J (0.003-0.015).
  69. scirrhoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scirrhoma (*kir-o'-mah). See scirrhus. s. caminariorum, chimney-sweep's carcinoma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scirrhoma (skir(sir)-ro'mah) [G. skirrhos, hard, + -oma.] Scirrhus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scirrhoma (skir(sir)-ro'mah) [G. skirrhos, hard, + -oma.] Scirrhus.
  70. scirrhous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scirrhous (skir'-us) (scirrhus}. Hard.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scirrhous (skir'(sir')us). Hard, relating to a scirrhus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scirrhous (skir'us) [L. scirrhefsus]. Pertaining to or of the nature of a scirrhus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scirrhous (skir'(sir')us). Hard, relating to a scirrhus.
  71. scirrhus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scirrhus (skir'-us) (vKtppos. hard]. A hard carcinoma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scirrhus (skir'(sir')us) [G. skirrhos, a hardened tumor.] Scirrhous carcinoma, fibrous cancer, a cancer in which induration has occurred through overgrowth of fibrous connective tissue in the stroma, the opposite of medullary cancer.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scirrhus (skir'us) [Gr. oxippos]. A hard cancer with a marked predominance of connective tissue.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scirrhus (skir'(sir')us) [G. skirrhos, a hardened tumor.] Scirrhous carcinoma, fibrous cancer, a cancer in which induration has occurred through overgrowth of fibrous connective tissue in the stroma, the opposite of medullary cancer.
  72. scissiparity - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scissiparity (sis-ip-ar'it-e) [L. scin'dere to split -fpa'rere to bring forth]. Reproduction by fission.
  73. sclerema - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sclerema (skle-re1-man) \sdera\. Sclerosis, or hardening, especially of the skin. S. adiposum, a grave form of sclerema neonatorum marked by extreme hardness of the skin, atrophy, and adherence to the subcutaneous tissues, s. adultorum, see morphea, s. cutis, scieroderma. s. neonatorum, a disease of the newborn characterized by a hardening of the subcutaneous tissue, especially of the legs and feet, and probably dependent on a coagulation of the fat. s. cedematosum, a generally fatal form of sclerema neonatorum marked by edema of the skin with induration, impairment of muscular action, and subnormal
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sclere'ma [G. skleros, hard.] Scleroderma, sclerodermia, dermatosclerosis, chorionitis, hidebound disease, skinbound disease; a hardening of the skin, occurring in patches or generalized, t. adulto'rum, diffuse symmetrical scleroderma, s. neonato'rum, an affection of the skin, usually fatal, occurring in premature infants; it consists in a progressive hardening of the skin, involving the entire body with the possible exception of the chest and abdomen; scirrhosarca.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sclerema (skle-re'mah) [Gr. o*Xqp4f hard). A hardened or sclerosed state of a tissue, especially of the skin. s. adulto'rum, diffuse symmetric scleroderma. s. neonato'rum, a very fatal disease of early infancy, with coldness, hardening, and tightness of the skin, especially that of the feet and legs, and depression of the respiration and pulse. It is thought to be due to coagulation or congelation of the fat.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sclere'ma [G. skleros, hard.] Scleroderma, sclerodermia, dermatosclerosis, chorionitis, hidebound disease, skinbound disease; a hardening of the skin, occurring in patches or generalized, t. adulto'rum, diffuse symmetrical scleroderma, s. neonato'rum, an affection of the skin, usually fatal, occurring in premature infants; it consists in a progressive hardening of the skin, involving the entire body with the possible exception of the chest and abdomen; scirrhosarca.
  74. scleriasis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scleriasis (skle-ri'-as-is) [sclera}. Scieroderma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scleri'asis. i. Sclerema adultorum, diffuse symmetrical scleroderma.* 2. Sclerosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scleriasis (skle-ri'as-is) [Gr. scleroderma. 2. A hardened state of an eyelid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scleri'asis. i. Sclerema adultorum, diffuse symmetrical scleroderma.* 2. Sclerosis.
  75. scleritis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scleritis (skle-ri'-tis) [sclera; irat innammation]. Inflammation of the sclerotic coat of the eye. It may exist alone (simple scleritis or episcleritis) or may be combined with inflammation of the cornea, iris, or choroid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scleritis (skle-ri'(re')tis). Inflammation of the sclera.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scleritis (skle-ri'tis) [sclera + Gr. -«w inflammation]. Inflammation of the sclerotica. It may be superficial (episcleritis) or deep. The latter form causes bulging and thinning of the sclerotic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scleritis (skle-ri'(re')tis). Inflammation of the sclera.
  76. scleroconjunctival - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scleroconjunc'tival. Relating to the sclera and the conjunctiva.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scleroconjunc'tival. Relating to the sclera and the conjunctiva.
  77. scleroconjunctivitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scleroconjunctivitis (skle-ro-kon-junk-ti-vi'-tis).
  78. sclerogenous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sclerogenous (skle-roj'-en-us) [sclero-; ywa», to beget]. Producing a hard substance.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sclerogenous (skle-roj'en-us) [G. skliros, hard, + gennad, I produce.] Producing hard or sclerotic tissue; causing sclerosis. scle'roid [G. skleros, hard, + eidos, resemblance.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sclerogenous (skle-roj'en-us) [Gr. axXrjpos hard + ytvvav to produce]. Producing sclerous tissue.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sclerogenous (skle-roj'en-us) [G. skliros, hard, + gennad, I produce.] Producing hard or sclerotic tissue; causing sclerosis. scle'roid [G. skleros, hard, + eidos, resemblance.]
  79. scleroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scleroid (skle'-roid) (ffK\t)p6t, hard; cUo>, form]. Hard or bony in texture.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scleroid (skle'roid) [Gr. an\ripfa hard -f (loot form). Having a hard texture
  80. scleroma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scleroma (skle-ro'-mah) [sclero-; &na, tumor]. Abnormal hardness or induration of a part. s. adultorum. Synonym of scieroderma. s.t respiratory, rhinoscleroma.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      scleroma (skle-ro'mah). Induration or hardening of tissue, especially of the tissues of the nose and larynx. [Gr., skleros, hard, -f- oma, tumor.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scleroma (skle-ro'mah) [Gr. mi\r;pwna induration). A hardened patch or induration, especially of the nasal or laryngeal tissues. 8. respirato'rium, rhinoscleroma.
  81. sclerophthalmia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sclerophthalmia (sklt-roff-thal'-me-ah) [sclero-; >>•'>• d£Xpor, eye]. Xerophthalmia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sclerophthalmia (skle-rof-thal'me-ah) [Gr. o-xXTip6$ hard -4- 6ipOa\tj*K eye]. The condition in which, from imperfect differentiation of the sclera and cornea, the former encroaches on the latter, so that only the central part of the cornea remains clear.
  82. sclerosal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sclerosal (skle-ro1-sal) [oK\t)pAt, hard]. Of the nature of sclerosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sclero'sal. Sclerous.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sclero'sal. Sclerous.
  83. sclerosed - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sclerosed (skle'-rozd) [sclerosis]. Affected with sclerosis; hardened.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sclerosed (skle-rozd'). Affected with sclerosis.
  84. sclerosing - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sclerosing (skle-ro'zing). Causing or undergoing sclerosis.
  85. sclerotitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sclerotitis (skle-ro-ti'(te')tis). i. Scleritis. a. Otosclerosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sclerotitis (skle-ro-ti'(te')tis). i. Scleritis. a. Otosclerosis.
  86. sclerotome - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sclerotome (skle'-ro-tom) (sdero*; rlfirw, to cut]. i. A knife used in sclerotomy. 2. A hard tissue separating successive myotomes in certain of the lower vertebrates. 3. The skeletal tissue of an embryonic metamere.
  87. scoleciform - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scoleciform (sko-les'-if-orm) [m6Xi£. a worm; forma, form]. Having the form or character of a scolex.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scoleciform (sko-le'sl-form) [G. skolix, worm + L. forma, form.] Scolecoid, vermiform.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scoleciform (sko-le'sl-form) [G. skolix, worm + L. forma, form.] Scolecoid, vermiform.
  88. scolecoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scolecoid (sko'-le-koid) fo*wXtj.ro* 1*171. worm-like]. I. Vermiform. 2. Resembling a scolex.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sco'lecoid [G. skollx, worm, + eidos, appearance.] i. Worm-like; vermiform, a. Resembling a scolex, hydatid.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      scolecoid (sko'le-koyd). Resembling a worm; vermiform. [Gr., skolex, worm, + eidos, resemblance.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sco'lecoid [G. skollx, worm, + eidos, appearance.] i. Worm-like; vermiform, a. Resembling a scolex, hydatid.
  89. scolecology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scolecology (sko-le-kol'-o-je). See helminthology.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scolecol'ogy [G. skolex(skolek-), worm, + -login.] Helminthology.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scolecology (sko-le-kol'o-je) [Gr. hdminthology.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scolecol'ogy [G. skolex(skolek-), worm, + -login.] Helminthology.
  90. scoliometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scoliom'eter [G. skolios, curved, + metron, measure.] An instrument for measuring curves, especially those in lateral curvature of the spine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scoliom'eter [G. skolios, curved, + metron, measure.] An instrument for measuring curves, especially those in lateral curvature of the spine.
  91. scoparin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scoparin (skn'-par-in). See under scoparius.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sco'parin. A glucoside, Cj,H21O10, from scoparius, occurring in yellow, tasteless, and odorless crystals ; diuretic in doses of gr. 5-10 (o. 3-0.6).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      scoparin (sko-pa'rin). A bitter neutral principle (CsoHrcOio-l-sHaO), obtained from the tops of Cytisus scoparius. It causes diuresis, probably through its action on the renal epithelium. [Lat., scoparium.1
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scoparin (sko-pa'rin). A yellowish, crystalline principle, CjolljoO.o, from the tops of Cyt'iita scopa'riia: diuretic. Hypodermic dose. J-i fr. (0.033-0.066 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sco'parin. A glucoside, Cj,H21O10, from scoparius, occurring in yellow, tasteless, and odorless crystals ; diuretic in doses of gr. 5-10 (o. 3-0.6).
  92. scoparius - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scoparius (sko-pa'-re-HS) [scapa. a broom]. The Cytisus scoparius, a shrub of the order Leguminoscc. The dried tops constitute the scoparius of the U. S. P. (scoparii cacumina, B. P.); they contain the alkaloid sparteine, CuHuNt. a_nd a neutral principle, scoparin, CnHuOio. Scoparius is diuretic and cathartic, these actions probably depending upon scoparin. Dose of the fluidextraci 90-40 mm. (1.3-3.6 Cc.). For properties of spartein, see spartrine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scopa'rius [L. scopa, a broom.] (N.F.) Scopa'rii cacu'mina [broom tops] (Br.), broom, besom, the dried tops of Cytisus scoparius, a shrub of Europe and northwestern Asia, containing sparteine; diuretic in cardiac dropsy and chronic Bright's disease in doses of gr. 10-15 (o .6-1.0).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      scoparius (sko-pa're-us). Syn.: scoparii cacumina [Br. Ph.], broom. The dried tops of Citysus scoparius. They contain scoparin and spartein. They are diuretic (see scoparin), but are not like digitalis in action (see spartein). The fluiilcxtract of scoparius is official in the U. S. Ph. Infusiini scoparii. An infusion of dried and bruised broom tops in boiling distilled water [Br. Ph.]. succus scoparii. Juice of broom; prepared by crushing fresh broom tops, expressing, adding alcohol, and filtering [Br. Ph.].
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scoparius (sko-pa're-us). The tops of Cyf'uu scapa'rius, or broom, a leguminous shrub. They contain the alkaloid spartein and the principle scoparin. They are diuretic, purgative, and emetic, and are used in dropsy. Dose of fluidcx tract, )-i fl.dr. (2-4 c.c.); of decoction. i-» fl.oi. (30-60 c.c.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scopa'rius [L. scopa, a broom.] (N.F.) Scopa'rii cacu'mina [broom tops] (Br.), broom, besom, the dried tops of Cytisus scoparius, a shrub of Europe and northwestern Asia, containing sparteine; diuretic in cardiac dropsy and chronic Bright's disease in doses of gr. 10-15 (o .6-1.0).
  93. scopophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scopophobia (sko-po-fo'-be-ah) \enm~u>, to examine; 460ot, fear]. A morbid dread of being seen.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scopophobia (sko-po-lblx-ah) [Gr. axortiv to view + v' i"'"> fear). A morbid dread of being seen.
  94. scotograph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scotograph (skot'-o-graf) [»«4rot, darkness; -,pi>..k. to write], x. An instrument for aiding the blind to write. 3. A name given to the picture produced by means of the so-called Roentgen-rays. See rays, Roentgen-.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sco'tograph [G. skotos, darkness, 4- graphd, I write.] i. An appliance for aiding one to write in straight lines in the dark or to aid the blind to write. :. An impression made on a photographic plate by a radioactive substance without the intervention of any opaque object other than the screen of the plate.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sco'tograph [G. skotos, darkness, 4- graphd, I write.] i. An appliance for aiding one to write in straight lines in the dark or to aid the blind to write. :. An impression made on a photographic plate by a radioactive substance without the intervention of any opaque object other than the screen of the plate.
  95. scotography - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scotography (skol-og'-raf-e). Skiagraphy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scotog'raphy. Skiagraph y.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scotography (sko-tog'raf-c). Same as skiagraphy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scotog'raphy. Skiagraph y.
  96. scotometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scotometer (skot-om'-et-vr) {nbrai, darkness; uirpor, a measure]. I. An instrument for detecting, locating, and measuring scotomata. 2. An instrument used in the detection of central scotomata.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      scotometer (sko-tom'e-ter). An instr; ment for detecting scotomata. [trf^ skotos, darkness, -f- metron, a measort 1
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scotometer (sko-tom'et-er) [scotoma -f- Or. nerpov measure]. An instrument for diagnosticating and measuring scotomata.
  97. screatus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      screatus (skre-a'-tus) [L.]. i. A hawking. 2. A neurosis characterized by paroxysms of hawking.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      screatus (skre-a'tus) [L.] Hawking. screen [Fr. ecran.] i. A thin sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence, such as heat, light, ap-rays, etc. 2. A sheet upon which a picture is projected, fluores'cent s., a s. coated with crystals of calcium tungstate used in the fluoroscope.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      screatus (skre-a'tus). A paroxysmal !u»«' ing due to psychoneurosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      screatus (skre-a'tus) [L.]. Paroxysmal hawking and snorting, due to neurosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      screatus (skre-a'tus) [L.] Hawking. screen [Fr. ecran.] i. A thin sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence, such as heat, light, ap-rays, etc. 2. A sheet upon which a picture is projected, fluores'cent s., a s. coated with crystals of calcium tungstate used in the fluoroscope.
  98. scrobiculate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scrobiculate (skro-bik'-u-lal) (scrobiculus, a little ditch or trench). Pitted or grooved. Possessing minute or shallow depressions.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scrobiculate (skro-bik'u-lat) [L. scrobifula'lus]. Marked with pits or cavities.
  99. scrofuloderma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scrofuloderma (skrof-u-lo-der'mah). See scrofulodtrm.
  100. scrofulosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scrofulosis (skrof-u-lo'sis). A tendency toward scrofula; the scrofulous diathesis.
  101. scrotocele - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scrotocele (skro'-to-set) [scrotum; *^xtj, tumor]. Same as scrotal hernia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scrotocele (skro'to-sel) [scrotum + G. kcle, hernia.] Scrntal hernia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scrotocele (skro'to-sel) [scrotum + Gr. tijAij hernia]. Scrotal hernia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scrotocele (skro'to-sel) [scrotum + G. kcle, hernia.] Scrntal hernia.
  102. scutellarin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scutellarin (sku-tel-ar'-in). i. An impure precipitate from an alcoholic tincture of scutellaria. Dose 3-4 gr. (0.2-0.26 Gm,). 2. CioHiOi. A nontoxic principle derived from the root of Scutellaria lattriflora, forming flat yellow needles, soluble in alcohol, ether, or alkalies, melting at iop° C. It is used as a tonic and sedative in nervous diseases. Dose J-4 gr, (0.05-0.26 Gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scutell'arin. A bitter crystalline glucoside from scutellaria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      scutellarin (sku-tel-a'rin). A crystalline principle, C|0H,Oj, found in scutellaria and other labiate plants. Dose, 1-4 gr. (0.066-0.26 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scutell'arin. A bitter crystalline glucoside from scutellaria.
  103. scybalous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scybalous (sib'-al-us) [scybalum]. Of the nature of a scybalum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scybalous (sib'a-lus) Relating to scybala.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scybalous (sib'a-lus) Relating to scybala.
  104. scybalum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      scybalum (sib'-al-um) [trx^aXov, fecal matter]. A mass of abnormally hard fecal matter.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      scybalum (sib'a-lum) [G. skybalon, excrement.] A hard round mass of inspissated feces.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      scybalum (sib'al-um). PI. scybala, A roundish mass of the feces. [Gr., skybalon, excrement.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      scybalum (sib'a-lum) [G. skybalon, excrement.] A hard round mass of inspissated feces.
  105. sebiferous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sebiferous (se-bif'-er-us) [sebum, fat;/«rr«, to bear]. Same as sebiparous.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sebif'erous [L. sebum, suet, + ferre, to bear.] Producing fatty or sebaceous matter, sebaceous, sebiparous.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sebiferous (se-bif'er-us). Producing sebum. [Lat., sebum, grease, + ferre, to bear.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sebif'erous [L. sebum, suet, + ferre, to bear.] Producing fatty or sebaceous matter, sebaceous, sebiparous.
  106. sebiparous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sebiparous (seb-ip'-or-us) [stbum; parere, to produce]. Secreting sebum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sebip'arous [L. sebum, suet, + parrre, to produce.] Sebiferous.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sebip'arous [L. sebum, suet, + parrre, to produce.] Sebiferous.
  107. sebolith - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sebolith (seb'-o-lilh) [sebum; Xifloj, a stone]. A concretion in a sebaceous gland.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      seb'olith [L. sebum, suet, + G. lithos, stone.] A concretion in a sebaceous follicle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      seb'olith [L. sebum, suet, + G. lithos, stone.] A concretion in a sebaceous follicle.
  108. sectile - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sectile (sek'-lif) [secare, to cut]. Capable of being cut.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sectile (sek'til) [L. sectitis; secare, to cut.] i. Capable of being cut or divided. 2. Having the appearance of being divided.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sectile (sek'tll) [L. secli'lis, from seca're to cut]. Susceptible of being cut.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sectile (sek'til) [L. sectitis; secare, to cut.] i. Capable of being cut or divided. 2. Having the appearance of being divided.
  109. sectio - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sectio (sek'-she-o) [L.]. See section. B. abdominis. See celiotomy. B. agrippina, cesarean section, s. alta, suprapubic cystotomy. 8. cadaveris, an_ autopsy, s. caesarea, cesarean section, s. franconiana, suprapubic cystotomy. s. lateralis, lateral lithotomy, s. tnarimia, s. medians, median lithotomy. s. nympharum, nymphotomy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sectio (sek'shyo) [L.] Section, s. agrippi'na, s. caesarea. s. alta, the high operation for stone, suprapubic lithotomy or cystotomy. s. cadav'eris, autopsy, post-mortem examination. I. csesa'rea, cesarean section.* a. latera'lis, lateral lithotomy, s. media'nn, median lithotomy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sectio (sek'she-o) [L. seca're to cut]. Latin for section. B. agrippi'na. See section, cesarean. B. al'ta, suprapubic cystotomy. s. cadav'eris, a postmortem examination; an autopsy. 8. latera'lis, lateral lithotomy. 8. media na, median lithotomy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sectio (sek'shyo) [L.] Section, s. agrippi'na, s. caesarea. s. alta, the high operation for stone, suprapubic lithotomy or cystotomy. s. cadav'eris, autopsy, post-mortem examination. I. csesa'rea, cesarean section.* a. latera'lis, lateral lithotomy, s. media'nn, median lithotomy.
  110. secundigravida - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      secundigravida (se-kun-de-grat'-id-ah) [secundus. second; graridus, pregnant]. A woman pregnant the second time.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      secun"digrav'ida [L. secundus, second + gravida, pregnant.] A woman in her second pregnancy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      secundigravida (se-kun"dig-rav'id-ah) (L. secun'dus second + grav'ida pregnant]. A woman pregnant for the second time.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      secun"digrav'ida [L. secundus, second + gravida, pregnant.] A woman in her second pregnancy.
  111. secundines - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      secundines (sek'-un-dent) [secundus, second]. The placenta, part of the umbilicus, and the membranes discharged from the uterus after the birth of the child.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      secundines (sek'un-dSnz) [L. secundinte.] The afterbirth, the membranes and placenta, the expulsion of which, following the birth of the child, constitutes the third stage of labor.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      secundines (sek'un-dSnz) [L. secundinte.] The afterbirth, the membranes and placenta, the expulsion of which, following the birth of the child, constitutes the third stage of labor.
  112. secundipara - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      secundipara (se-kun-dip'^ar-ah) [secundus, second; parere, to bring forth]. A woman who has borne two children (not twins).
  113. sedimentator - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sed'imentator. A centrifuge.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sed'imentator. A centrifuge.
  114. segregator - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      segregator (sec'-re-ga-ior) [segregare, to separate]. An instrument by means of which urine from each kidney may be secured without danger of admixture.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      seg'regator [L. segregare, to separate.] A separator, a device by means of which the portions of urine entering the bladder from the two ureters are collected separately without being allowed to mingle; see Cathelin, Downes, Harris, Luys.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      segregator (seg're-ga-tor). An instrument for securing the urine from each kidney separately. Harris' B., an instrument for collecting the urine from each kidney separately. Luys' 8., an 'intatfment for collecting the urine Iron) each kicbey separately.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      seg'regator [L. segregare, to separate.] A separator, a device by means of which the portions of urine entering the bladder from the two ureters are collected separately without being allowed to mingle; see Cathelin, Downes, Harris, Luys.
  115. seismotherapy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      seismotherapy (sls-mo-ther'-ap-e) [shaking cure.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      seismotherapy (siz-mo-ther'3-pl). Sismotherapy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      seismotherapy (siz-mo-ther'ap-e) [Gr. ,i,..>,/,., shake + therapy}. The treatment of disease by mechanic vibration.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      seismotherapy (siz-mo-ther'3-pl). Sismotherapy.
  116. sejunction - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sejunction (sc-junk'-shun) [sejungere, to disunite]. In psychology the interruption of the continuity of association-complexes, tending to break up personality.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sejunc'tion [L. sejungere, to disjoin.] A separatio-; a breaking of continuity in the mental processes resulting in a loss of personality.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sejunction (se-junk'shun). An interruption of the continuity of association-complexes which leads to a breaking up of the personality.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sejunc'tion [L. sejungere, to disjoin.] A separatio-; a breaking of continuity in the mental processes resulting in a loss of personality.
  117. self-digestion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      self-diges'tion. Autodigestion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      self-digestion (self'di-jes'chun). Same as autodigestion.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      self-diges'tion. Autodigestion.
  118. self-infection - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      self-infec'tion. Autoinfection.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      self-infection (self'in-fek'shun). See auto-infection.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      self-infec'tion. Autoinfection.
  119. semeiography - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      semeiography (sem-i-og'-ra-fe) [numo*, sign; «»•, to write]. Symptomatology.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      semeiog'raphy. Semiography.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      semeiog'raphy. Semiography.
  120. semicoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      semico'ma. A mild degree of coma from which it is possible to arouse the patient.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      semicoma (sem-e-ko'mah). A mild coma from which the patient may be aroused.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      semico'ma. A mild degree of coma from which it is possible to arouse the patient.
  121. semicomatose - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      semico'matose. In a condition of unconsciousness from which one can be aroused.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      semicomatose (sem-e-ko'mat-6s). In a condition of semicoma.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      semico'matose. In a condition of unconsciousness from which one can be aroused.
  122. semiflexion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      semiflexion (tem-e-fok'-shun) [semi-; flexion, a flexion]. A posture half-way between flexion and extension.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      semiflex'ion. The position of a joint or segment of a limb midway between extension and flexion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      semiflexion (sem-e-flek'shun). The position of a limb midway between flexion and extension.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      semiflex'ion. The position of a joint or segment of a limb midway between extension and flexion.
  123. semimembranosus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      semimembranosus (sem-e-mem-bra-no'-sus). See muscles, table of.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sem"imembrano'sus. See under musculus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      semimembranosus (sem"e-mem-bran-o'sus) [L. sr'tnis half 4- membrano'sus membranous). See muscles, table of.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sem"imembrano'sus. See under musculus.
  124. semimembranous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      semimembranous (sem-e-memf-bra-nus). Partly membranous, as the semimembranous muscle (semimembranosus). See under muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      semimem'branous. Consisting partly of membrane, noting the musculus semimembranosus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      semimembranous (sem-e-mem'bran-us). Made up in part of membrane or fascia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      semimem'branous. Consisting partly of membrane, noting the musculus semimembranosus.
  125. semination - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      semination (sem-in-a'-shun) \*fminnt nt a sowing]. The introm ss on of semen into the uterus or vagina.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      semina'tion. Insemination.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      semination (sem-in-a'shun) [L. semina'tio}. The introduction of semen into the vagina or uterus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      semina'tion. Insemination.
  126. semiography - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      semiography. See semtiograpky.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      semiography (se-me-og'raf-e). Semeiography.
  127. semiparasite - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      semiparasite (sem-e-par'as-It). An organism with moderate infcstiousness for living tissue, such as the typhoid bacillus and cholera vibria.
  128. semistarvation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      semistarvation (sem"e-star-va'shun). The socalled hunger-cure.
  129. semitendinosus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      semitendinosus (sem-U-fn-din-o'-sus). See muscles, table of.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      semitendino'sus. See under musculus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      semitendinosus (sem"e-ten-din-o'sus). See muscles, table of.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      semitendino'sus. See under musculus.
  130. senega - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      senega (scn'-c-ga', [L.]. The Polygala senega, a plant of the Polygalea. Its root is official (senega, U. S. P.; senega radix, B. P.); it contains a bitter principle, senegin or polygalic acid (or polygalin), which is probably identical with saponin. It is used as a stimulant, expectorant, and diuretic; in large doses it is emetocathartic. It is chiefly employed in bronchitis and laryngitis, as a diuretic in dropsy, and in amenorrhea. Dose 10-20 gr. (0.651.3 Gm.); of the infusion i oz. (30 Cc.). s., fluidextract of (JluiJexIrattum senega, U. S. P.). Dose
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sen'ega [Seneca, an Indian tribe, one of the Five Nations.] (U.S.) Senega; radix (Br.), the dried root of Polygala senega, an herb of eastern and central North America; expectorant in chronic bronchitis in doses of gr. 10-15 (0,6-1.o).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sen'ega [Seneca, an Indian tribe, one of the Five Nations.] (U.S.) Senega; radix (Br.), the dried root of Polygala senega, an herb of eastern and central North America; expectorant in chronic bronchitis in doses of gr. 10-15 (0,6-1.o).
  131. senegin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      senegin (sen'-e-jin), CnHuOi? (Hesse). Polygallic acid, a saponin-like glucoside from senega; it is a yellowish powder, soluble in water; used as an expectorant and diuretic. Dose j-2 gr. (0.0320.13 Gm.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sen'egin. The active principle of senega occurring in the drug in a mixture with polygalic acid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      senegin (sen'e-jin). The active principle of senega; a saponin. Dose, |-i gr. (0.016-0.66 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sen'egin. The active principle of senega occurring in the drug in a mixture with polygalic acid.
  132. sennin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sennin (sen'-in) [Nicholas Senn, American surgeon. 1844-1908]. A proprietary antiseptic preparation described as a chemically pure product of boric acid, iodine and phenol. It is a fine, white powder, odorless, slightly astringent, and of sweetish taste,
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sennin (sen'nin) [after N. Senn]. A combination of phenol and iodin, employed as an antiseptic surgical dressing.
  133. sensiferous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sensiferous ( sense; ferre. to bear]. Conveying a sensation, or sense-impression.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sensif'erous [L. sensus, sense, + fftre, to carry.] Conducting a sensation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sensiferous (scn-siFer-us) [L. sen'sus sense + fer're to carry]. Transmitting sensations.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sensif'erous [L. sensus, sense, + fftre, to carry.] Conducting a sensation.
  134. sensigenous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sensigenous (sen-sij'-en-us) [sensus, sense; gignere, to produce]. Giving rise to a sensory impulse.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sensigenous (sen-sij'en-us) [L. sensus, sense, + G. gennao, I produce.] Giving rise to sensation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sensigenous (sen-sij'en-us) [L. sen'sus sense + Gr. v <"<• to generate]. Producing sensory impulses.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sensigenous (sen-sij'en-us) [L. sensus, sense, + G. gennao, I produce.] Giving rise to sensation.
  135. sentisection - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sentisection (^ n-tis-ek'-shun) [senlire, to feel; stctio, section]. Painful vivisection; vivisection of an animal not under the influence of anesthetics.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sentisec'tion. Vivisection of an animal that is not anesthetized; see callisection.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sentisection (sen-te-sek'shun) [L. senli're to perceive + sec'lio to cut). Vivisection of an unanesthetized animal.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sentisec'tion. Vivisection of an animal that is not anesthetized; see callisection.
  136. septan - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      septan (sepf-tan) [septem, seven]. Recurring every seventh day, as septan fever.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sep'tan [L. septem, seven.] Noting a malarial fever, the paroxysms of which recur every seventh day.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sep'tan. Recurring every seventh day. [Lat., septem, seven.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      septan (sep'tan) [L. sep'tem seven]. Recurring every seventh (sixth) day.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sep'tan [L. septem, seven.] Noting a malarial fever, the paroxysms of which recur every seventh day.
  137. septectomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      septectomy (sep-tek'-to-me) [septum; brAm, excision]. Excision of part of the nasal septum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      septec'tomy [L. saptum, septum, + ektome excision.] Operative removal of the whole or a part of a septum specifically of the septum narium.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      septectomy (sep^tek'to-me) [septum + Gr. kroitfi excision]. Excision of a portion of the nasal septum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      septec'tomy [L. saptum, septum, + ektome excision.] Operative removal of the whole or a part of a septum specifically of the septum narium.
  138. septentrionaline - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      septentrionaline (sep-ten-tre-on'-al-en). An alkaloid obtained from Aconitum lycocionum. It is a sensory paralyzant, resembling curara; it has been suggested as a local and general anesthetic, and is used as an antidote to strychnine and in treatment of tetanus and hydrophobia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      septentrionaline (sep-ten-trt-on'al-en). An alkaloid derived from Aconitum lycoctonum; a local analgesic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      septentrionaline (sep-ten-trt-on'al-en). An alkaloid derived from Aconitum lycoctonum; a local analgesic.
  139. septicemic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      septice'mic. Relating to, suffering from, or resulting from septicemia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      septicemic (sep-tis-e'mik). Pertaining to, or of the nature of, septicemia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      septice'mic. Relating to, suffering from, or resulting from septicemia.
  140. septicine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      septicine (sep'-lis-in) [septic]. A ptomaine obtained from decaying flesh.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sep'ticine. A ptomaine from decaying animal matter.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sep'ticine. A ptomaine from decaying animal matter.
  141. septile - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sep'tile. Septal.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      septile (sep'tll). Of or pertaining to a septum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sep'tile. Septal.
  142. septometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      septometer (sep-tom'-el-er) [septum; uirpw, a measure], i. An instrument for determining the thickness of the nasal septum. 2. [sepsis.] An apparatus for determining organic impurities in the air.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      septom'eter [septum -j- G. metron, measure.] An instrument, like a pair of calipers with straight arms, used for measuring the thickness of the nasal septum.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      septometer (sep-tom'et-er). :. An instrument for determining the quantity of organic putrescible matter present in air. [Gr., septos, corrupted, + mctron, a measure.] 2. An instrument for measuring the thickness of the nasal septum. [I it., septum, partition, + Gr., metron, a measure.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      septometer (sep-tom'et-strpftum partition + me'trum measure.] An instrument for measuring the thickness of the nasal septum. 2. [Gr. mprros decayed + \ibrpov measure.] Same as sepsometer.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      septom'eter [septum -j- G. metron, measure.] An instrument, like a pair of calipers with straight arms, used for measuring the thickness of the nasal septum.
  143. septonasal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      septonasal (sep-to-na'-tal) [septum, septum; nasus, nose]. Pertaining to the nasal septum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      septona'sal. Relating to the nasal septum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      septonasal (sep-to-na'ul). Pertaining to the nasal septum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      septona'sal. Relating to the nasal septum.
  144. septulum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      septulum (sep'-tu-lum) [L.; pi., septula}, A small septum. B. testis. See septula testis.
  145. sequestral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sequestral (sc-kwes1-trot) [sequestrum, sequestrum]. Pertaining to, or of the nature of, a sequestrum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sequestral (se-kwes'tral). Pertaining to or of the nature of a sequestrum.
  146. sequestrectomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sequestrectomy (sc-kives-trek'-to-me). See seqttestrotomy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sequestrec'tomy [L. sequestrum + G. ektome, excision.] The operative removal of a sequestrum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sequestrectomy (se-kwes-trek'to-me) [L. sequts'Irum + Gr. ixro/i^ excision]. The surgical removal of a sequestrum. •
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sequestrec'tomy [L. sequestrum + G. ektome, excision.] The operative removal of a sequestrum.
  147. seralbumin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      seralbu'min. Serum albumin.*
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      seralbumin (ser-al-bu'min). Serum albumin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      seralbumin (se-ral-bu'min). Serum-albumin: the albumin of the blood.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      seralbu'min. Serum albumin.*
  148. serolin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      serolin (se'-ro-lin) (sero-; oleum, oil]. A neutral fatty constituent of blood, occurring in small amount; its nature is undetermined.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      serolin (ser'o-lin). A compound contained in blood. [Lat., serolina.]
  149. serologist - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      serologist (se-rol'-o-jist). One versed in serology.
  150. seromucous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      seromucous (se-ro-mu'-kus). Having the nature of or containing both serum and mucus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      seromu'cous. Composed of or containing serum and mucus.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      seromucous (se-ro-mu'kus). Partaking of the nature of both serum and mucus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      seromucous (se-ro-mu'kus). Partly serous and partly mucous.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      seromu'cous. Composed of or containing serum and mucus.
  151. seropurulent - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      seropurulent (se-ro-pu'-roo-lent) [sero-; purulent]. Composed of serum and pus. as a seropurulent exudate. seropus (se'-ro-pus) [sero-; pu*\. A fluid consisting of serum and pus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      seropu'rulent. Composed of or containing both serum and pus, noting a discharge of thin, watery pus, or seropus.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      seropu'rulent. Partaking of the nature of both serum and pus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      seropurulent (se-ro-pu'ru-lent). Both serous and purulent.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      seropu'rulent. Composed of or containing both serum and pus, noting a discharge of thin, watery pus, or seropus.
  152. serosa - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      serosa (se-ro'-sah) (serous; membrana, understood]. A serous membrane.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sero'sa [L. fern, of serosus, serous (sc. tunica, coat, or membrana, membrane.] Serous membrane, especially the serous or peritoneal coat of the intestines.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      serosa (se-ro'sah). A serous membrane.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sero'sa [L. fern, of serosus, serous (sc. tunica, coat, or membrana, membrane.] Serous membrane, especially the serous or peritoneal coat of the intestines.
  153. serositis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      serositis (se-ro-si'(se')tis) [L. serosa + G. -»<«.] Inflammation of a serous membrane, orrhomeningitis. multi'ple s., polyorrhomeningitis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      serositis (se-ro-si'(se')tis) [L. serosa + G. -»<«.] Inflammation of a serous membrane, orrhomeningitis. multi'ple s., polyorrhomeningitis.
  154. serpentaria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      serpentaria (ser-p«n-ta'-re-ah) [L.J. Virginia snakeroot, the root of several species of Aristolochiat of the order Aristotochiacea. The rhizome and rootlets of Aristolochia serpentaria and Arislolochia reticulata constitute the serpentaria of the U. S. P. (scrpentaria rhizoma. B. P.). Serpentaria contains a volatile oil. a bitter principle, and a nitrogenous principle called aristolofhin. It is a stimulant, tonic diaphoretic, and diuretic, and is used in intermittent fever and in -Iv iMHi.i. B.t fluidextract of (ftuidrxtractum serpentaria, U. S. P.). Dose 20-30 min. (1.3-2.0 Cc.). s., infusion of (infusum serpentaria. B. P.). Dose i or. (32 Cc.). s., tincture of (tmctnra serpentaria, U. S. P., B. P.). Dose I dr. (4 Cc.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      serpenta'ria (U.S.). Serpentarife rhizoma (Br.), the dried rhizome and roots of Aristolochia serpentaria, serpentary, sangree, Virginia snakeroot; stomachic, diuretic, and diaphoretic in doses of gr. 10-30 (0.6-2.0).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      serpentaria (ser-pen-ta're-ah) II,. ser'pens snake]. The rhizome and roots of Aristoh'chia serpenla'ria and A. reticula'la, or Virginia snake-root, herbs of North America. Serpentaria is tonic, diaphoretic, and diuretic, and is used as a stimulant in typhoid fever and typhoid pneumonia, as a digestive tonic, and in eruptive fevers. Dose of fluidextract, 10-30 min. (0.666-2 c.c.); of tincture, J-2 fl.dr. (2-8 c.c.); of infusion, i fl.oz. (30 c.c.); of tinctu'ra cincko'rut compos'tin, i fl.dr. (4 c.c.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      serpenta'ria (U.S.). Serpentarife rhizoma (Br.), the dried rhizome and roots of Aristolochia serpentaria, serpentary, sangree, Virginia snakeroot; stomachic, diuretic, and diaphoretic in doses of gr. 10-30 (0.6-2.0).
  155. serpolet - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      serpolet (ser'po-let) [L. serpyl'lum thyme]. A kind of camphory oil from Thy'mus serpyl'lum, used mainly in perfumery; also the plant which produces it; wild thyme.
  156. serrago - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      serrago (ser-a'-go) [L., gen., serraginis]. Sawdust. serrate, serrated (ser'-&t. ser'-a-ted) (serra, a saw]. Provided with sharp projections like the teeth of a saw.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      serra'go [L. serra, a saw.] Sawdust.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      serrago (ser'a-go), gen. serra'ginis [L.]. Saw-dust. It has a limited use in surgical dressings.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      serra'go [L. serra, a saw.] Sawdust.
  157. serratus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      serratus (sfr-a'-tus) [L.J. Serrated; applied to muscles arising or inserted by a series of processes resembling the teeth of a saw. See under muscU.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      serra'tus [L ] Serrate, serrated; see under muscultts.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      serratus (scr-a'tus). See ntuscles, table of.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      serra'tus [L ] Serrate, serrated; see under muscultts.
  158. setiferous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      setif'erous [L. seta, bristle, + ferre, to carry.] Bristly, having bristles.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      setiferous (se-tifer-us) [L. se'ta bristle + Jer're to bear]. Bearing bristles; covered with bristles.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      setif'erous [L. seta, bristle, + ferre, to carry.] Bristly, having bristles.
  159. setigerous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      setigerous (s6-tij'er-us) [L. seta, bristle, + gerert, to carry.] Setiferous.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      setigerous (se-tij'er-us) [L. se'ta bristle + ge'rere to carry]. Same as seliferous.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      setigerous (s6-tij'er-us) [L. seta, bristle, + gerert, to carry.] Setiferous.
  160. sevum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sevum (se'-vum) [L.]. Suet. 8. pr separatum, the prepared suet of the U. S. P.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      se'vum [L.] Suet or tallow, s. benzoina'tum (N.P.), benzoinated suet; benzoin 30, sevum prseparatum 1000. B. prtepara'tum (U.S., Br.), prepared suet, prepared mutton tallow; the internal fat of the abdomen of the sheep, Ovis aries, purified by melting and straining; employed in pharmacy in making ointments.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sevum (se'vum). Latin for suet, a, benzoina' turn, benzoinated suet. s. pnepuru turn, prepared suet.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      se'vum [L.] Suet or tallow, s. benzoina'tum (N.P.), benzoinated suet; benzoin 30, sevum prseparatum 1000. B. prtepara'tum (U.S., Br.), prepared suet, prepared mutton tallow; the internal fat of the abdomen of the sheep, Ovis aries, purified by melting and straining; employed in pharmacy in making ointments.
  161. sex-limited - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sex-limited (sekslim-K-ted). Occurring in one sex only.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sex-limited. Affecting one sex only.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sex-limited (sekslim-K-ted). Occurring in one sex only.
  162. sexivalent - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sexiv'alent [L. sex, six, + valere, to have strength.] Having a combining power equal to six atoms of hydrogen.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sexivalent (sek-siv'al-ent) [L. sex six + rale're to have power]. Able to combine with or displace six atoms of hydrogen.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sexiv'alent [L. sex, six, + valere, to have strength.] Having a combining power equal to six atoms of hydrogen.
  163. sextan - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sextan (seks'-tan) [sex, six]. Occurring every sixth day. as a sextan fever.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sex'tan. Noting a malarial fever the paroxysms of which recur every sixth day.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sextan (seks'tan). Recurring every sixth day. [Lat.. sejcliis. sixth.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sextan (seks'tan) [L. scxla'nus of the sixth]. Recurring every sixth day.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sex'tan. Noting a malarial fever the paroxysms of which recur every sixth day.
  164. shadowgram - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      shadowgram. See skiagram.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      shad'owgram. Skiagram.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      shad'owgram. Skiagram.
  165. shadowgraphy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      shadowgraphy (shad'o-graf-f). Skiagraphy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      shadowgraphy (shad'o-graf-e). Same as skiagrapky.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      shadowgraphy (shad'o-graf-f). Skiagraphy.
  166. sialadenitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sialadenitis (si-al-ad-en-i'(e')tis) [G. sialon, saliva, + aden, gland, + -itis.] Inflammation of a salivary gland.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sialadenitis (si-al-ad-en-i'(e')tis) [G. sialon, saliva, + aden, gland, + -itis.] Inflammation of a salivary gland.
  167. sialolithiasis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sialolithiasis (si-al-o-lith-i'-as-is) lspittle; X40<*, stone]. The presence of salivary calculi.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sialolithiasis (si"al-o-lith-i'as-is). The formation or presence of a salivary calculus. [Gr., sialon, saliva, + lilhiasis, the formation of a stone.]
  168. sibbens - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sibbens (sib'-tnz) [Gael., subhan, raspberries]. A disease formerly endemic in the Scotch highlands, and by some identified with syphilis, by others with yaws.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sibb'ens [Gaelic, subhag, raspberry, cf. frambcesia ] A form of syphilis formerly endemic in Scotland, the lesions of which resembled those of* frambcesia.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sibbens (sib'bens). Syn.: sivvens. A name for certain affections, probably including both frambesia and syphilis, regarded formerly as an endemic disease peculiar to Scotland.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sibbens (sib'enz). A disease formerly prevalent in Scotland, somewhat resembling yaws and syphilis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sibb'ens [Gaelic, subhag, raspberry, cf. frambcesia ] A form of syphilis formerly endemic in Scotland, the lesions of which resembled those of* frambcesia.
  169. sibred - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sibred (sib'red) [A.S. sibraden, relationship.] Relationship, as between children of the same parents.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sibred (sib'red). Relationship; kindred.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sibred (sib'red) [A.S. sibraden, relationship.] Relationship, as between children of the same parents.
  170. sideration - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sideration (sid-er-a'-shun) [sideratto, blight produced by thestarsj. i. Apoplexy, a. Gangrene. 3Lightning-stroke. 4. Therapeutic application of electric sparks.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sidera'tion [L. siderari, to be planet struck ] Any sudden attack, as of apoplexy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sideration (sid-er-a'shun). Therapeutic application of electric sparks.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sidera'tion [L. siderari, to be planet struck ] Any sudden attack, as of apoplexy.
  171. siderism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      siderism (sid'-tr-itm) (siderites. the lodestonej. The curative influences long supposed to be exerted over the body by the lodestone; metallotherapy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      siderism (sid'er-izm) [Gr. al&rfpos iron]. Same as tnttallothera py.
  172. siderodromophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      siderodromophobia (sid'er-o-drom-o-fo'W-ah) [G sideros. iron, + dromos, road, + pkobos. fear.] Morbid fear aroused by the sight, or sometimes thought, of a railway, a locomotive, or a train of cars
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      siderodromophobia (sid'er-o-drom-o-fo'W-ah) [G sideros. iron, + dromos, road, + pkobos. fear.] Morbid fear aroused by the sight, or sometimes thought, of a railway, a locomotive, or a train of cars
  173. sideroscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sideroscope (sid-cr-o-skoP') [vtbjpot, iron; vnn-tu*, to examine]. An instrument for the detection of particles of iron or steel in the eyes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sid'eroscope [G. sidiros, iron, + skofed, I view.] A very delicately poised magnetic needle for the detection of the presence and location of a particle of iron or steel imbedded in the eyeball.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sideroscope (sid'er-o-skop). An instrument for showing the presence of particles of iron or steel in the eye. Pooley's s. consists essentially of a suspended magnetic needle. [Gr., sideros, iron, + skopein, to examine.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sideroscope (sid'er-o-skOp) [Gr. atoqpot iron + ffxorctv to see). A magnet or other appliance for determining the presence of metallic iron as a foreign body in the eye.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sid'eroscope [G. sidiros, iron, + skofed, I view.] A very delicately poised magnetic needle for the detection of the presence and location of a particle of iron or steel imbedded in the eyeball.
  174. siderous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sid'erous. Containing or composed of iron.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      siderous (sid'er-us). Containing iron. [Gr., sideros, iron.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      siderous (sid'er-us) [Gr. aLSiipos iron). Containing iron.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sid'erous. Containing or composed of iron.
  175. sidonal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      si'donal. Piperazin quinate. new a., the anhydride of quimc acid proposed as a substitute for the original sidonal
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sidonal (si'don-al). Piperazin quinate, (Ci»HaiN=0,i). It is said to be useful in the treatment of gout.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sidonal (sid'on-al). Piperazin quinate, a white powder, soluble in water. It is a uric-acid solvent. Dose, is-jogr. (1-2 gm.). news., quinic acid anhydrid: used like sidonal.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      si'donal. Piperazin quinate. new a., the anhydride of quimc acid proposed as a substitute for the original sidonal
  176. sigmatism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sigmatism (sig' -mat-ism) [see sig moid], i . Defective utterance of the sound of s. 2, The too frequent use of the s sound in speech.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sig'matism [G. sigma, the letter s.] A form of stammering in which pronunciation of the letter a is imperfect.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sig'matism [G. sigma, the letter s.] A form of stammering in which pronunciation of the letter a is imperfect.
  177. sigmoidostomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sigmoidostomy (sig-moid-os'-to-me) [sigmoido-; *r£fjn, mouth). The formation of an artificial anus in the sigmoid flexure of the colon.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sigmoidos'tomy [G. sigmoeides, sigmoid, + sioma, mouth.] Establishment of an artificial anus by opening into the sigmoid colon.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sigmoidos'tomy [G. sigmoeides, sigmoid, + sioma, mouth.] Establishment of an artificial anus by opening into the sigmoid colon.
  178. signaturist - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sig'naturist. One who, like the followers of Paracelsus, believed in the doctrine of signatures.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      signaturist (sig'nat-ur-ist). One who believes in the doctrine of signatures.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sig'naturist. One who, like the followers of Paracelsus, believed in the doctrine of signatures.
  179. siliquose - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      siliquose (ril'-ik-wds). Resembling a silique. s. cataract, see cataract.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      siliquose (sil'ik-wOs). Having siliqucs, or resembling a silique. See cataract and desquamalion.
  180. sinalbin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sinalbin (sin-al'-bin). A white crystalline substance, found in mustard, a. :>..
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sinal'bin [sinapis alba, white mustard.] A fixed oil in white mustard from which acrinyl sulphocyanide is formed by the action of myrasin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sinalbin (sin-al'bin). A white, crystalline principle, CjoHnNjSjO,,, from the seeds of white mustard, Sina'pis alba.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sinal'bin [sinapis alba, white mustard.] A fixed oil in white mustard from which acrinyl sulphocyanide is formed by the action of myrasin.
  181. sinamine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sinamine (sin'-am-en). CiHiCN. Allyl cyanamidc, a substance obtained from crude oil of mustard.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sinam'ine. Allyl cyanamide derived from oil of mustard.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sinam'ine. Allyl cyanamide derived from oil of mustard.
  182. sinapin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sinapin (sin'-ap-in) [olvavi. mustard], CieN-jOj. A substance occurring as a sulphocyanate in white mustard.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sinapin (sin-a'pin). An unstable base, (',,.!!_,NOj, existing in white mustard, Sina'pis al'ba.
  183. sincipital - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sincipital (sin-sip'-it-al) [sinripul]. Pertaining to the sinciput.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sincipital (sin-sipl-tal). Relating to the sinciput.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sincipital (sin-sipl-tal). Relating to the sinciput.
  184. singultous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      singultous (siii-gulf-us). Relating to or affected with Hiccup.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      singul'tous. Relating to hiccups.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      singul'tous. Relating to hiccups.
  185. siphonage - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      siphonage (si'-fon-af) [aia siphon]. The action of a siphon, such as in washing out the stomach, in drainage of wounds, or in house-plumbing.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      siphonage (si'fon-ej). Washing out the stomach or other cavity by means of a siphon.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      siphonage (si'fun-aj). The use of the siphon, as in washing the stomach or in draining wounds.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      siphonage (si'fon-ej). Washing out the stomach or other cavity by means of a siphon.
  186. sitfast - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sitfast. In farriery, a piece of dead tissue in the skin which would be thrown off but that it has formed firm connections with the fibrous skin beneath, or with the deeper tissues, and is thus bound in its place as a persistent source of irritation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sit'fast. A small hard cutaneous tumor on the back of a horse, often resulting from the induration of a neglected warble.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sit'fast. A small hard cutaneous tumor on the back of a horse, often resulting from the induration of a neglected warble.
  187. sitiology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sitiology (si~te-ol'-o-je). See sitology.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sitiol'ogy [G. sition, food, + -togia.] Sitology.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sitiology (sit-e-ol'o-je). Same as -iiology.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sitiol'ogy [G. sition, food, + -togia.] Sitology.
  188. sitiophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sitiophobia (sil-e-o-fo'-be-ah). See sitophobia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sitiopho'bia [G. sition, food, + phobos, fear.] Sitophobia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sitiopho'bia [G. sition, food, + phobos, fear.] Sitophobia.
  189. sitology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sitology (\i~i>A'-nourishment; XAv«, a treatise). The science of nourishment or dietetics.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sitol'ogy [G. sitos, food, H—logia.] Dietetics.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sitology (si-tol'o-je) [Gr. <rirot food + XA-yos discourse). The sum of knowledge regarding food, diet, and nutrition.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sitol'ogy [G. sitos, food, H—logia.] Dietetics.
  190. skatol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      skatol (skat'-ol) [warfe, gen. of />, dung], CtHvN, methyl indol; it is a nitrogenous compound produced by the decomposition of proteids in the intestinal canal.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      skatol (ska'tol) [Gr. anSip, o-xardt dung]. Betamethyl indol, a strong-smelling, crystalline substance, CHs.C«H«N, from human feces. It is produced by the decomposition of proteins in the intestine.
  191. skatoxyl - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      skatoxyl (skai-oks'-il) [p (tricar-), dung; A£fo, acid). A product of the oxidation of skatol. It ia obtained from the urine in cases of disease of the large intestine.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      skatoxyl (ska-toks'il). Syn.: methyl indoxyl. The radicle, CHaCsHsN; an oxidation product of skatol, found in large amounts in the urine of patients affected with disease of the large intestine, s. sulphuric acid. See under acid.
  192. skiagraph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      skiagraph (ski'-ag-raf). See skiagram.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ski'agraph. Skiagram.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      skiagraph (ski-ag-raf). See skiagram.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      skiagraph (ski'ag-raf) [Gr. shadow + ypaifiiv to write]. A picture or photograph made by the Rontgen rays.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ski'agraph. Skiagram.
  193. skiagraphy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      skiagraphy (ski-ag'-ra-fe) [nil. shadow; yp&fcir. to write}. Photography by the Roentgen-rays; skotography, skiography, radiography, electrography, electroskiography, Roentography. and the new photography are names that have been used to designate the method.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      skiag'raphy [G. skia, shadow, -f- grapho, I write.] The making of x-ray photographs, the passage of z-rays through a more or less solid substance, such as part of the body, in front of a photographic plate, the softer parts through which the rays penetrate readily appear in light shadow, the bones and other more solid structures appear in darker shadow on the plate.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      skiagraphy (ski-ag'raf-e) [Gr. >i,ypatptiv to write]. The art or process of making skiagraphs or photographs by means of the Rontgen rays. It is performed by placing the part or article between the rays and a photographic plate, when the rays will penetrate many substances, as the flesh, which are impervious to ordinary lightrays; but any substance, as bone or glass, which is impervious to the Rontgen rays, will cast a shadow of itself upon the photographic plate.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      skiag'raphy [G. skia, shadow, -f- grapho, I write.] The making of x-ray photographs, the passage of z-rays through a more or less solid substance, such as part of the body, in front of a photographic plate, the softer parts through which the rays penetrate readily appear in light shadow, the bones and other more solid structures appear in darker shadow on the plate.
  194. skunk-cabbage - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      skunk-cabbage. Dracontium fcetidum, the rhizome of which is stimulant, antispasmodic, and narcotic, and has been used in asthma, rheumatism, hysteria, and dropsy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      skunk'-cabbage. Dracontium, Symplocarpus jxtidus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      skunk-cabbage (skungk-kab'ij). The fetid araceous marsh plant, Symplocar'pus fal'idiu, of North America. Its rhizome is stimulant, antispasmodic, and narcotic. Dose of fluidextract,
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      skunk'-cabbage. Dracontium, Symplocarpus jxtidus.
  195. sleeping-sickness - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sleep'ing-sick'ness. I. African trypanosomiasis, African lethargy, nelavan, narcolepsy; an endemic disease in tropical Africa caused by the presence in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of Trypanosama gambiense. a protozoan introduced by the bite of a species of tsetse fly, Glossina palpalis. The symptoms consist in mental deterioration, an increasing tendency to drowse or sleep, tremors, enlargement of the lymphatic glands, emaciation, an evening elevation of temperature, and a rapid pulse. The disease is uniformly fatal, if untreated, but recovery has been observed after the employment of organic arsenic compounds. 2. Encephalitis lethargica.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sleeping-sickness. See Congo trypanosomiasis, under trypanosomiasis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sleep'ing-sick'ness. I. African trypanosomiasis, African lethargy, nelavan, narcolepsy; an endemic disease in tropical Africa caused by the presence in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of Trypanosama gambiense. a protozoan introduced by the bite of a species of tsetse fly, Glossina palpalis. The symptoms consist in mental deterioration, an increasing tendency to drowse or sleep, tremors, enlargement of the lymphatic glands, emaciation, an evening elevation of temperature, and a rapid pulse. The disease is uniformly fatal, if untreated, but recovery has been observed after the employment of organic arsenic compounds. 2. Encephalitis lethargica.
  196. smilacin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      smilacin (smi1-las-in) [\milax], I. The precipitate from a tincture of the root of sarsaparilla, Smilax officinalis, alterant, detergent, diaphoretic, and stimulant. Dose 2-5 gr. (0.13-0.32 Gm.). 2. C«H«O» (FlUckiger) or CiaHaoOe (Poggiale) or CuHisO* (Peterson). Folchi's name for a saponin-like glucoside found by Palotta, in 1824, in sarsaparilla-root (various apecies of Smilax), and named by him pariglin. It forms a yellowish-white powder, soluble in water and alcohol; alterative, expectorant, and emetic, and used in syphilis and colds. Dose 1-3 gr. (0.065-0.2 Gm.). Syn., parillin (Batha); salseparin (Thubeuf).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      smi'lacin. Smilasaponin, Cj0HJ2O,|,, a non-crystalHzable substance from sarsaparilla.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      smilacin (smi'las-in) [Gr. o-^tX&icivos pertaining to smilax]. i. A poisonous glucosid, C1RH30O8, from sarsaparilla. 2. A precipitate or concentration prepared from sarsaparilla.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      smi'lacin. Smilasaponin, Cj0HJ2O,|,, a non-crystalHzable substance from sarsaparilla.
  197. smilax - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      smilax (smi'-laks). See sarsaparilla.
  198. snow-blindness - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      snow-blindness. See blindness, snow-.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      snow'-blindness. Conjunctival irritation caused by the reflection of bright sunlight from snow; it is characterized by photophobia, blepharospasm, a burning pain in the eyes, hyperemia, and chemosis, with or without pronounced amblyopia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      snow-blindness (sno-). See blindness.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      snow'-blindness. Conjunctival irritation caused by the reflection of bright sunlight from snow; it is characterized by photophobia, blepharospasm, a burning pain in the eyes, hyperemia, and chemosis, with or without pronounced amblyopia.
  199. sodor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sodor (so'-dor). The proprietary name for capsules of liquid carbonic acid for preparation of carbonated beverages.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      so'dor. A Swiss apparatus for the instantaneous impregnation of liquids with carbon dioxid, similar to the "sparklet" apparatus.
  200. sofos - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sofos (so'fos). A proprietary mixture of sodium dihydrogen phosphate and sodium hydrogen carbonate rendered stable by coating the particles of one of the constituents with disodium hydrogen phosphate When treated with water, sodium phosphate is formed and carbon dioxid is set free.
  201. sol-lunar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sol-lunar (sol-lu'nar) [L. sol sun + ht'na moon]. Caused by the sun and moon.
  202. solanidine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      solanidine (so-lan'-id-fn). An alkaloid obtained by decomposing solanine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      solan'idine. A crystallizable alkaloid, C:H41NO2, obtained by treating solanine with dilute acids; its effects are similar to those of solanine, but it is said to be free from the irritant action of the latter.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      solan'idine. A crystallizable alkaloid, C:H41NO2, obtained by treating solanine with dilute acids; its effects are similar to those of solanine, but it is said to be free from the irritant action of the latter.
  203. solanoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      solanoid (sol'-an-oid) [solanum. nightshade; cZAoi, like). Of a potato-like texture, as a solanoid carcinoma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      solanoid (so'lan-oid) [L. sola'num potato ! Gr. flons form). Resembling a raw potato in texture.
  204. solferino - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      solferino (sol-fer-e'-no) [an Italian city, the scene of a battle]. A synonym otfuchsin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      solferino (sol-fer-e'no). Same zsfuchsin.
  205. solidism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      solidism (sol'-id-izm) [solid]. The theory that diseases depend upon alterations in the solids of the body.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sol'idism. The ancient doctrine that diseases are due to changes in the solid parts of the body; opposed to humoralism.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      solidism (sol'id-izm) [L. sol'idus solid]. The obsolete doctrine that changes in the solids of the body, such as expansion or contraction, are the causes of every disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sol'idism. The ancient doctrine that diseases are due to changes in the solid parts of the body; opposed to humoralism.
  206. solidist - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      solidist (solr-id~ist) [solidus. solid]. The name given to one opposed to the doctrines of the humora lists.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      solidist (sol'id-ist). One who accepts the doctrine of solidism.
  207. somal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      somal (so'-mal). Pertaining to the body.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      somal (so'mal). Pertaining to the body.
  208. somatogenic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      somatogenic (so-mat-o-jen'-ik) [tr^a, the body; ffway. to produce]. Pertaining to somatogeny.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      somatogenic (so"mah-to-jen'ik) fG. s6ma(sonat-}, body, + -genis.} Originating in the soma or body under the influence of external forces.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      somatogenic (so"mah-to-jen'ik) fG. s6ma(sonat-}, body, + -genis.} Originating in the soma or body under the influence of external forces.
  209. somatome - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      somatome (so'-mat-6m) [body; Tom^. a cutting], i. A transverse segment of an organized body; a somite. 2. An embryotome.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      so'matome [G. soma, body, + tamos, cutting.] A somite or metamere. 2. An instrument for cutting the trunk in embryotomy.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      somatome (so'mat-6m). A segment of the trunk of the embryo; a somite. [Gr., soma, the body, + tome, a cutting.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      so'matome [G. soma, body, + tamos, cutting.] A somite or metamere. 2. An instrument for cutting the trunk in embryotomy.
  210. somatoplasm - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      somatoplasm (so'-mat-o-plasm) (tru/io, the body; xXdff^a, anything formed]. The protoplasm of the body-cells; Weismann's term for that form of living matter which composes the mass of the body, and which is the subject of death, as distinguished from germ-plasm, which composes the reproductive cells and is possessed of potential immortality.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      so'matoplasm [G. soma(sdmat-), body, + plasma, something formed.] i. The protoplasm of the cell-body. 2. The aggregate of all the forms of specialized protoplasm entering into the composition of the body.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      so'matoplasm [G. soma(sdmat-), body, + plasma, something formed.] i. The protoplasm of the cell-body. 2. The aggregate of all the forms of specialized protoplasm entering into the composition of the body.
  211. somnos - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      somnos (somf-nos) [somnus, sleep]. A proprietary hypnotic formed by the chemical reaction between chloral hydrate and glycerol in certain proportions.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      som'nos. Trade name of an hypnotic, said to be a solution of chloral glycerolate, obtained by the interaction of glycerin and anhydrous chloral; dose 3I-4 (4.0-16.0).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      som'nos. A proprietary hypnotic and sedative liquid containing hydrated chloral.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      som'nos. Trade name of an hypnotic, said to be a solution of chloral glycerolate, obtained by the interaction of glycerin and anhydrous chloral; dose 3I-4 (4.0-16.0).
  212. sorbefacient - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sorbefacient (sor-be-fa'-shent) [sorbere, to suck; facere, to make]. I. Promoting absorption. 2. A medicine or agent that induces absorption.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sorbefa'cient [L. sorbere, to suck up, + jacere, to make.] i. Causing absorption. 3. An agent which causes or facilitates absorption.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sorbefacient (sor-be-fa'shent). Producing or promoting absorption. [Lat., sorbtrt, to suck in, + facere, to do, to make.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sorbefa'cient [L. sorbere, to suck up, + jacere, to make.] i. Causing absorption. 3. An agent which causes or facilitates absorption.
  213. soroche - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      soroche (so-ro'-cha) [Sp.]. Mountain sickness.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      soroche (so-ro'cha) [Sp.] Mountain sickness.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      soroche (so-ro'cha) [Sp.] Mountain sickness.
  214. southernwood - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      southernwood. See artemisia abrotanum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      south'ernwood. Brotanum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      southernwood (suth'ern-wood). See abrotanum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      south'ernwood. Brotanum.
  215. sparganosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sparganosis (spar-ga-no'sis). Infestation with so-ne variety of Sparganum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sparganosis (spar-gan-o'sis). Infestation with Sparganum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sparganosis (spar-ga-no'sis). Infestation with so-ne variety of Sparganum.
  216. spargosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spargosis (spar-go'-sis) [owapyav. to be distended], i. Enlargement of a part. 2. Enlargement of the breasts from accumulation of milk. 3. Elephantiasis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spargo'sis [G.] i Distention of the breasts with milk. 2. Swelling or thickening of the skin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spargo'sis [G.] i Distention of the breasts with milk. 2. Swelling or thickening of the skin.
  217. spasmodism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spasmodism (spaz'-mod-izm) [spasm]. Fleury's term for those nervous states that originate in medullary excitation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      spasmodism (spaz'mo-dizm). A spasmodic condition due to medullary excitation.
  218. spasmophilia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spasmophilia (spaz-mo-JU'-e-ah) [spasmo-; 0tXcIr. to love]. A morbid tendency to convulsions.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      spasmophilia (spas-mo-fil'e-ah). Ner>ou> overexcitability with a tendency to convulsions. [Gr., spasmos, a spasm, 4philein, to love.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      spasmophilia (spaz-mc-nl'e-ah) (Gr. airaanin spasm + to love]. An abnormal tendency to convulsions.
  219. spasmus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spasmus (spaz'-mus) [avatufa, spasm], A spasm. s. bronchialis. Synonym of bronchial asthma, s. cynicus, spasmodic contraction of muscles on both sides of the mouth, giving a grinning expression, s. glottidis, spasm of the glottis or larynx, laryngismus atridulus. s. intestinorum. Synonym of enter algia. B. muscularis. Synonym of cramp, s. nictitans, spasmodic action of the orbicularis palpebrarum muscle, causing a winking-like movement of the lid. s. nutans, salaam convulsions, nodding spasm, s. oculi. Synonym of nystagmus. B. ventriculi. Synonym of enteralgia and of gastrodynia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spas'mus [G. spasmos.] Spasm. B. ag'itans, paralysis agitans. a. cani'nus, risus sardonicus. s. coordina'tus, compulsive movements, such as imitative or mimic tics, festination, etc. 8. glott'idis, laryngismus stridulus. a. nic'titans, nictitating spasm. B. nu'tans, nodding spasm.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spas'mus [G. spasmos.] Spasm. B. ag'itans, paralysis agitans. a. cani'nus, risus sardonicus. s. coordina'tus, compulsive movements, such as imitative or mimic tics, festination, etc. 8. glott'idis, laryngismus stridulus. a. nic'titans, nictitating spasm. B. nu'tans, nodding spasm.
  220. spermatin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spermatin (sper'-mat-in) [sperm]. An odorless, mucilaginous substance found in semen.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sper'matin. An albuminoid in the seminal fluid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      spermatin (sper'mat-in) [Gr. aviptta seed). An albuminoid substance derived from the semen. It is related to mm in and to nudeo albumin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sper'matin. An albuminoid in the seminal fluid.
  221. spermatocele - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spermatocele (sper'-mat-o-sll) [spermato-; K^i, tumor]. A spermatic cyst or encysted hydrocele containing spermatozoa.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spermatocele (spur'ma-to-sel) [G. fperma, seed, + kflg, tumor.] A cystic heart-shaped tumor of the epididymis containing spermatozoa.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      spermatocele (spcr'mat-o-sel) [Gr. a-nlppa seed + f/i\ri tumor]. A cystic distention of the epididymis or the rete testis containing spermatozoa.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spermatocele (spur'ma-to-sel) [G. fperma, seed, + kflg, tumor.] A cystic heart-shaped tumor of the epididymis containing spermatozoa.
  222. spermatocytal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spermatocytal (sper-mat-o-sif-ta[). Pertaining to a spermatocyte.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spermatocy'tal. Relating to the spermatocytes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      spermatocytal (sper"mat-o-si'tal). Pertaining to a spermatocyte.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spermatocy'tal. Relating to the spermatocytes.
  223. spermatogone - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      spermatogone (sper'mat-o-gfln). Spermatogonium.
  224. spermatoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spermatoid (sper'-mat-oid). See spermatozoon.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sper'matoid [G. sperma(spermat-'), seed, + Mm, resemblance.] i. Resembling semen. 2. Sperma tozoid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      spermatoid (spe^mat-oid) [Gr. ortpua seed t «Z5os form], i. Resembling semen. 2. A male or flagellated form of the malarial microparasitc.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sper'matoid [G. sperma(spermat-'), seed, + Mm, resemblance.] i. Resembling semen. 2. Sperma tozoid.
  225. spermatoon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spermatoon (sper-mat-o'-on) (spermato-; ^6*-, egg]. The nucleus of a sperm-cell or spermatozoon.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spermato'on [G.' sperma(spermal-), seed, + 6?«, egg.] Spermatid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spermato'on [G.' sperma(spermal-), seed, + 6?«, egg.] Spermatid.
  226. spermatophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sper'matopho'bia [G. sperma(spermat-), seed, phobos, fear.] A form of hypochondriasis in which the patient erroneously believes himself to be suffering from spermatorrhea.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      spermatophobia (.sper"mat-o-fo'be-ah) [Gr. Ita, seed + 6fiot fear]. A morbid dread of being affected with spermatorrhea.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sper'matopho'bia [G. sperma(spermat-), seed, phobos, fear.] A form of hypochondriasis in which the patient erroneously believes himself to be suffering from spermatorrhea.
  227. spermatophore - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sper'matophore [G. sperma(spermat-), seed (semen). + pharos, a bearer.] Spennatogonium.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sper'matophore [G. sperma(spermat-), seed (semen). + pharos, a bearer.] Spennatogonium.
  228. spermatorrhea - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      spermatorrhea (sper"mat-or-e'ah) [Gr. mripua seed + poia flow]. Involuntary, too frequent, and excessive discharge of semen without copulation.
  229. sphacelate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sphacelate (sfas'e-lat) [G. sphakelos, gangrene.] To slough, to become gangrenous.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sphacelate (sfas'e-lat) [G. sphakelos, gangrene.] To slough, to become gangrenous.
  230. sphacelation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sphacelation (sfas-el-a -shun). The formation of a sphacelus; moist gangrene; necrosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sphacelation (sfas-e-la'shun). i. The process of becoming gangrenous. 2.- Necrosis, gangrene.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sphacelation (sfas-e-la'shun). i. The process of becoming gangrenous. 2.- Necrosis, gangrene.
  231. sphacelism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sphacelism (sfas'-el-itm) [o-^dxeXnc. gangrene], i. The condition of being affected with sphacelus. a. Necrosis. 3. Inflammation of the brain.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sphacelism (sfas'e-lizm). Sphacelation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sphacelism (sfas'e-lizm). Sphacelation.
  232. sphacelous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sphacelous (sfas'-el-us) \aa*t\ot, gangrene]. Pertaining to sphacelus; gangrenous; necrosed.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sphacelous (sfas'e-lus). Necrotic, gangrenous, sloughing.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sphacelous (sfas'e-lus). Necrotic, gangrenous, sloughing.
  233. sphacelus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sphacelus (sfas'-el-us) [ff^AxcXot, gangrene]. A slough.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sphacelus (sfas'e-lus) [G. sphakelos, mortification.] i. Moist gangrene, a. A slough, a soft mass of necrotic matter.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sphacelus (sfas'el-us). Moist gangrene; a slough. [Gr., sphakelos, gangrene.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sphacelus (sfas'e-lus) [G. sphakelos, mortification.] i. Moist gangrene, a. A slough, a soft mass of necrotic matter.
  234. sphenethmoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sphenethmoid (sfe-neth'-moid). Same as sphrnoethmoid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spheneth'moid. Sphenoethmoid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spheneth'moid. Sphenoethmoid.
  235. sphenopalatine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sphenopalatine (sfe-no-pal'-a-tin) [spheno-; palatum, palate]. Pertaining to the sphenoid bone and the palate, an the sphenopalatine foramen, s.-foramen, the spheno-palatine notch converted into a foramen
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sphenopalatine (sfe-no-pal'a-tin). Relating to the sphenoid and the palate bones, s. fora'men, the s. notch converted into a foramen by the under surface of the body of the sphenoid bone. 8. notch, incisura sphenopalatina, a deep notch between the sphenoidal and orbital processes of the palate bone.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sphenopalatine (sfe-no-pal'at-in). Pertaining to or in relation with the sphenoid and palatine bones.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sphenopalatine (sfe-no-pal'a-tin). Relating to the sphenoid and the palate bones, s. fora'men, the s. notch converted into a foramen by the under surface of the body of the sphenoid bone. 8. notch, incisura sphenopalatina, a deep notch between the sphenoidal and orbital processes of the palate bone.
  236. sphenopetrosal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sphenopetrosal (sfe-no-pe-tro'-sal) [spheno-; rirpa, mi k.|. Pertaining to the sphenoid bone and the petrous portion of the temporal bone.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sphenopetrosal (sfe"no-pe-tro'sal). Pertaining to the sphenoid bone and the petrosa.
  237. sphygmic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sphyg'mic [G. sphygmos, pulse.] R elating to the puls*
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sphygmic (sfig'mik) [Gr. aPertaining to the pulse.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sphyg'mic [G. sphygmos, pulse.] R elating to the puls*
  238. sphygmographic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sphygmographic (sfig-mo-graf-ik). Pertaining tothe sphygmograph.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sphygmographic (sfig-mo-graf'ik). Pertaining to the sphygmograph.
  239. sphygmoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sphygmoid (sfi^'-moid) [tr^vyu&t, pulse; tlSot, resemblance]. Resembling or having the nature of continuous pulsation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sphyg'moid [G. sphygmos, pulse, + eidos, resemblance.] Resembling the pulse, pulse-like.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sphyg'moid [G. sphygmos, pulse, + eidos, resemblance.] Resembling the pulse, pulse-like.
  240. sphygmology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sphygmology (sfig-mol'-o-je) [sphygmo-; X^yos, treatise]. The branch of medicine dealing with the characters of the pulse.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sphygmology (sfiR-mol'o-je) [Gr. ,.,-i.-, u/., pulse + \ii~im treatise). The sum of what is known regarding the pulse.
  241. sphygmoscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sphyg'moscope [G. sphygmos, pulse, + shaped, I view.] An instrument by which the pulse beats are made visible by causing fluid to rise in a glass tube, by means of a mirror projecting a beam of light, or simply by a moving lever as in the sphygmograph.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sphygmoscope (sfig'mo-skop) [Gr. oipvtuin pulse -f auntiiv to view). A device for rendering the pulse-beat visible. Bishop's »., an apparatus for measuring the blood-pressure, especially the diastolic pressure.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sphyg'moscope [G. sphygmos, pulse, + shaped, I view.] An instrument by which the pulse beats are made visible by causing fluid to rise in a glass tube, by means of a mirror projecting a beam of light, or simply by a moving lever as in the sphygmograph.
  242. spider-web - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spi'der-web. Tela aranea, formerly used as a hemostatic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spi'der-web. Tela aranea, formerly used as a hemostatic.
  243. spigelian - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      spigelian (spi-jele-an) Noting a lobule of the liver (named after A. van der Spiefel, or Spigelius, a Flemish anatomist, 1558-1625)—the Ipbulus spigelii. It is the smallest lobe of the liver, projecting from the posterior part of the under surface of the right lobe.
  244. spilus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spilus (spi'-lus) [irirlXof, a spot]. A mole or colored mark on the skin; nevus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spi'lus [G. spilos, a spot.] Naevus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spi'lus [G. spilos, a spot.] Naevus.
  245. spinalis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spinalis (spi-naf-lis) [spine]. I. Spinal. 2. A muscle attached to the spinous processes of the vertebrae; see under muscle.
  246. spindle-tree - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spin'dle-tree. Euonymus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spin'dle-tree. Euonymus.
  247. spinitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spinitis (spi-ni'-tis). See myelitis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spinitis (spi-ni'(ne')tis). i. Myelitis. 2. Pott's* disease, spondylitis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spinitis (spi-ni'(ne')tis). i. Myelitis. 2. Pott's* disease, spondylitis.
  248. spirillosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spirillosis (spir-il-o'-sis). i. Any affection due to
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spirillosis (spi-ril-lo'sis). Any disease caused by the presence of spirilla in the blood or tissues.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      spirillosis (spi-ril-o'sis). i. Any diseased condition attended or marked by the presence of spirilla in the body. 2. A disease of fowls marked by diarrhea, fever, malaise, and death in a few days. It is caused by a spirillum transmitted by ticks of the genus Argas.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spirillosis (spi-ril-lo'sis). Any disease caused by the presence of spirilla in the blood or tissues.
  249. spirochetosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spirochetosis (spi-ro-ke-U/-sis). An infection caused by Spirochete.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spirochetosis (spi-ro-ke-to'sis) [Spirochata + -osw.] Any disease caused by a spirochete, such as syphilis, bronchopul'monary B., hemorrhagic bronchitis, Castellani's bronchitis, a bronchitis marked by severe cough and frequent hemor.rhages, caused by the presence in large number of Spirochata bronchialis. gas'tric a., grasssickness, s. arthrit'ica, a painful joint affection due apparently to the pathogenic action of a spirochete, 5. forans. a. icterohemorrhag'ica, acute infectious jaundice, Weil's* disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spirochetosis (spi-ro-ke-to'sis) [Spirochata + -osw.] Any disease caused by a spirochete, such as syphilis, bronchopul'monary B., hemorrhagic bronchitis, Castellani's bronchitis, a bronchitis marked by severe cough and frequent hemor.rhages, caused by the presence in large number of Spirochata bronchialis. gas'tric a., grasssickness, s. arthrit'ica, a painful joint affection due apparently to the pathogenic action of a spirochete, 5. forans. a. icterohemorrhag'ica, acute infectious jaundice, Weil's* disease.
  250. spiroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      spiroid (spi'roid). Resembling a spiral.
  251. spirometric - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spirometric (spi-ro-mct'-rik) (spiro-; pfe-po*, measure]. Pertaining to the spirometer or to spirometry.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      spirometric (spi-ro-met'rik). Pertaining to spirometry or the spirometer.
  252. spissated - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spissated (spis'-a-ted). Inspissated.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spiss'ated [L. spissatus; spissare, to thicken.] Inspissated, thickened.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spiss'ated [L. spissatus; spissare, to thicken.] Inspissated, thickened.
  253. splanchnopleure - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      splanchnopleure (splangk'-no-ploor) (splanchno- ;
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      splanchnopleure (splunk'no-plur) [G. splanchnon, viscus, + pleura, side.] The embryonic layer formed by the union of the visceral layer of the mesoderm with the entodenn; splanchnic or visceral mesoblast.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      splanchnopleure (splank'no-plur) [Gr. ar\iyxvov viscus -\- TrXeupa side], i. The inner layer of the mesoblast, separated from the somatopleure by the pleuroperitoneal space. Called also splanchnic mesoblast and tisceral mesoblast. 2. The layer formed by the union of the splanchnopleure (i) with the hypoblast. From it are developed the muscles and the connective tissue of the intestine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      splanchnopleure (splunk'no-plur) [G. splanchnon, viscus, + pleura, side.] The embryonic layer formed by the union of the visceral layer of the mesoderm with the entodenn; splanchnic or visceral mesoblast.
  254. splay-foot - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      splay-foot. See talipes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      splay-foot. Flat-foot, talipes valgus.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      splay-foot. See flat-foot.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      splay-foot. Flat-foot, talipes valgus.
  255. splenial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      splenial (spte-nc-at) [vw\^un>t bandage]. I. Serving as a bandage or splint. 2. Pertaining to the splenium or to the splenius.
  256. splenitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      splenitis (splen-i'-tis) [splen-; mi, inflammation]. Inflammation of the spleen, s., spodogenous, that due to accumulation of waste-matter.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      splenitis (sple-ni'tis). Inflammation of the spleen. [Gr., splen, spleen, + itis, inflammation.]
  257. splenius - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      splenius (sple'-ne-us) [splenium]. Shaped like a splenium, as the splentus muscle or simply splenius. See under muscle.
  258. splenization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      splenization (splen-t-za'-shun) [spleen]. The change in an organ, especially the lung, produced by congestion, whereby it cornea to resemble the tissue of the spleen.
  259. splenoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      splenoid (splen'-oid) [spleno-; tlSoi. resemblance]. Resembling the spleen.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sple'noid [G. splen, spleen, + eidos, resemblance.] Spleniform, resembling the spleen.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sple'noid [G. splen, spleen, + eidos, resemblance.] Spleniform, resembling the spleen.
  260. splenunculus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      splenunculus (splen-ttng'-kfi-lus). Accessory
  261. splint-bone - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      splint-bone. The second or fourth small metacarpal bones of the horse.
  262. spondylitic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spondylitic (spon-dil-it'-ik). Relating to spondylitis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      spondylitic (spon-dil-it'ik). i. Affected with or of the nature of spondylitis. 2. A person affected with spondylitis.
  263. spongioblast - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spongioblast (spun'-je-o-Uast) [sponge; 0Xcelts, amatrine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spongioblast (spun'jT-o-blast) [G. spongia, sponge, + blastos, germ.] I. Amacrine* cell. 2. A primitive neuroglia cell, one of the layer of columnar cells in the neural tube.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spongioblast (spun'jT-o-blast) [G. spongia, sponge, + blastos, germ.] I. Amacrine* cell. 2. A primitive neuroglia cell, one of the layer of columnar cells in the neural tube.
  264. spongioid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      spongioid (spun1-je-oid) [sponge; tldot, resemblance]. Spongiform.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spon'gioid [G. spongia,sponge, + eidos,resemblance.] Spongiform,
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spon'gioid [G. spongia,sponge, + eidos,resemblance.] Spongiform,
  265. sporangial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sporan'gial. Relating to or of the nature of a sporangium.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sporangial (spo-xan'je-al). Pertaining to a sporangium.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sporan'gial. Relating to or of the nature of a sporangium.
  266. sporangiophore - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sporangiophore (spo-ran'je-o-for). The threadlike stalk which bears at its tip the sporangium of molds.
  267. sporidium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sporidium (spor-id'-e-um) [spore; t5tot>. a dim.; pl., sporidia}. i. In biology, a spore borne upon a pro mycelium. 2. A provisional genus of Sporozpa. S. vaccinate, Funck, a species of sporozoa occurring as: (i) small, spheric, highly refractive bodies (2-10 M). of green color and slow movement; (2) small refracting spheres inclosed in capsules; (3) morula masses or spore-casts. They can be cultivated and the culture produces typical vaccinia when inoculated in calves.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sporid'ium. A protozoan spore, an embryonic protozoan organism, sometimes parasitic in man or the lower animals.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sporidium (spo-rid'e-um), pi., sporidia. i. A spore found in a promycelium. x. The spore stage of a protozoan organism. S. vaccinate. A protozoon supposed to be the microorganism of smallpox and vaccinia. See Cytorrhyctes variolqe.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sporidium (spo-rid'e-um), pi. sporid'ia. A protozoan organism in one of the spore-stages of its growth: frequently seen in the vertebrate organism as a parasite. S. vaccina'le. Same as Cytorrhyctes vaccinia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sporid'ium. A protozoan spore, an embryonic protozoan organism, sometimes parasitic in man or the lower animals.
  268. sporiferous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sporiferous (spor-if'-er-vs) [spore; ferre, to bear]. Spore-bearing.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sporiferous (spaw-rif'er-us) [L. spora, spore, + ferre, to bear.] Producing spores.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sporiferous (spo-rif'er-us). Producing or bearing spores. [Lat., spora, spore, + ferre, to bear.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sporiferous (spo-rif'er-us) [L. spo'ra spore + la're to bear). Producing or bearing spores.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sporiferous (spaw-rif'er-us) [L. spora, spore, + ferre, to bear.] Producing spores.
  269. sporocyst - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sporocyst (spor'-o-sist) [sporo-; *6ffrit. a bag].
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sporocyst (spawr'o-sist) [G. sporos, seed, + kystis, bladder.] The intermediate (asexual) generation of a trematode worm, by some regarded as the second larval stage; it is developed in the body of a gastropod from the miracidium and gives origin to the cercaria, either directly or through an intermediate generation, the redid.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sporocyst (spo'ro-sist). A zygote in the cystic stage of its development. [Gr., spora, spore, + kystis, cell.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sporocyst (spo'ro-sist) (Gr. o*6pos seed + niiant cell), i. Any cyst or sac containing spores or reproductive cells, especially in a vegetal or animal organism of a low type. 2. The envelop that forms about a sporoblast in its course of development into a spore. Called also spore membrane.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sporocyst (spawr'o-sist) [G. sporos, seed, + kystis, bladder.] The intermediate (asexual) generation of a trematode worm, by some regarded as the second larval stage; it is developed in the body of a gastropod from the miracidium and gives origin to the cercaria, either directly or through an intermediate generation, the redid.
  270. sporogenous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sporogenous (spor-oj'-en-us) [spore; -,*/*• producing]. In biology, spore-producing.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sporogenous (spaw-roj'en-us) [G. sporos, seed, + gennao, I produce.] Sporiparous.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sporogenous (spo-roj'en-us) [Gr. cnripos spore + yii'i'tv to produce). Reproduced by spores.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sporogenous (spaw-roj'en-us) [G. sporos, seed, + gennao, I produce.] Sporiparous.
  271. sporont - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sporont (spor'-onf) [sporo-; fa, being], z. In biology a gregarine without an epimerite, as distinguished from a cephalont. 2. Schaudinn's term for the single-celled contents of the coccidial oocyst. Cf. sckizont.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sporont (spawr'ont) [G. sporos, seed, + on(ont-), being.] A sexually mature protozoan parasite which has become detached from its host, leaving its attaching organ behind; it produces anisospores that conjugate to form the zigote, this developing into the schizont which begins the non-sexual cycle.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sporont (spo'ront). A form of developmental stage of protozoa having alternate generations in which the s. is produced by sexual conjugation and forms sporozoites,
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sporont (spo'ront) [Gr. cephalont. The sporont gives off anisospores which conjugate to form zygotes, which develop into schizonts.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sporont (spawr'ont) [G. sporos, seed, + on(ont-), being.] A sexually mature protozoan parasite which has become detached from its host, leaving its attaching organ behind; it produces anisospores that conjugate to form the zigote, this developing into the schizont which begins the non-sexual cycle.
  272. sporoplasm - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sporoplasm (spor'-o-plazm) [sporo-; i-Xlo-trctr, to form ]. The cytoplasm of the asexual reproductive celL
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spo'roplasm [G. sporos, seed, + plasma, thing formed.] The protoplasm of the ovum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sporoplasm (spo'ro-plazm) [Gr. arbpot seed + - A.i.uih plasm]. The protoplasm of reproductive cells.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spo'roplasm [G. sporos, seed, + plasma, thing formed.] The protoplasm of the ovum.
  273. sporotrichosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sporotrichosis (spor-o-trik-o'-sis). Infection by sporothrix, producing indolent subcutaneous abscesses.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sporotrichosis (spaw-ro-tri-ko'sis) [sporotrichum + -0S15.] A cutaneous and subcutaneous mycosis (affecting also the mucous membrane of the mouth and pharynx) caused by mucedines of the genus Sporotrichum; three forms are described— a disseminated gummatous form (s. beurmanni), a gummatous lymphangitis (s. schenkii), and a form characterized by the presence of multiple abscesses (s. dori). trop'ical a., due to Sporotrichum indicum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sporotrichosis (spo"ro-trik-o'sis). Infection by sporotricha, producing an eruption of refractory subcutaneous abscesses.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sporotrichosis (spaw-ro-tri-ko'sis) [sporotrichum + -0S15.] A cutaneous and subcutaneous mycosis (affecting also the mucous membrane of the mouth and pharynx) caused by mucedines of the genus Sporotrichum; three forms are described— a disseminated gummatous form (s. beurmanni), a gummatous lymphangitis (s. schenkii), and a form characterized by the presence of multiple abscesses (s. dori). trop'ical a., due to Sporotrichum indicum.
  274. sporular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sporular (spor'-u-lar). Having the character of a sporule.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      spor'ular. Relating to a spore or sporule.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      spor'ular. Relating to a spore or sporule.
  275. sporule - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sporule (spur'-ul) [arbpot, seed]. A term applied to a minute spore; also sometimes to minute granules within a spore.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sporule (spawr'ul) [L. sporula; dim. of sporos, seed.] A spore, a small spore.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sporule (spo'rul). A small spore; a segmented malarial parasite after sporulation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sporule (spor'Ql). A small spore.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sporule (spawr'ul) [L. sporula; dim. of sporos, seed.] A spore, a small spore.
  276. sprew - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sprew (sproo). See sprue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sprew. Sprue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sprew. sprue (spra). i. Thrush. 2. Psilosis; a chronic disease marked by sore mouth, with a rawlooking tongue, gastro-intestinal catarrh with periodic diarrhea, and diminution in the size of the liver. It occurs mostly in hot countries, and causes emaciation, anemia, and frequently death. Called also tropical stomatitis, and Cochin-China diarrhea. Belyando s. See grass sickness, under sickness.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sprew. Sprue.
  277. sputamentum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sputamen'tum. Sputum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sputamentum (spu-tah-men'tum) [L.]. Sputum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sputamen'tum. Sputum.
  278. squillitic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      squillitic (skwil-it'-ik). Pertaining to or containing squill.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      squillitic (skwil-it'ik) [L. sciUificus; Gr. om\Xirucof]. Pertaining to or containing squill.
  279. stactometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stactometer (stak-tom'-et-tr) (vTaxrin, a dropping; pirpov, a measure]. An instrument for measuring drops.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stactom'eter [G. staktos, dropping, + matron, measure.] Stalagmometer,* a dropper.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stactom'eter [G. staktos, dropping, + matron, measure.] Stalagmometer,* a dropper.
  280. stalagmometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stalagmometer (stal-ag-mom'-et-er) [vraXa-ypfe, a dropping; utrpov, a measure]. An Instrument for measuring the size of drops, or the number of drops in a given volume of liquid. It is used to measure the surface tension of liquids.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stalagmom'eter [G. stalagma, drop, + nttrsn. measure.] An instrument for determining «• actly the number of drops in a given quantity of fluid; used as a measure of the surface tension of a fluid, for the lower the tension is, the smaller are the drops, and consequently the more numerous in the given quantity of fluid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stalagmom'eter [G. stalagma, drop, + nttrsn. measure.] An instrument for determining «• actly the number of drops in a given quantity of fluid; used as a measure of the surface tension of a fluid, for the lower the tension is, the smaller are the drops, and consequently the more numerous in the given quantity of fluid.
  281. stapedial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stape'dial. Relating to the stapes.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stape'dial. Relating to the stapes.
  282. staphisagria - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      staphisagria (staf-is-ag'-re-ah) [oTcufiti, a dried grape; Aypux, wild). Stavesacre. The staphisagria of the U.S. P. is the ripe seed of Delphinium slaphisagria, of the order Ranunculacece. It contains the alkaloids delphinine, CsiHrNO»,t C«HisNiOr, dclphisine, CjrH«N:O4, and staphisagrine, CuHijNOi. It has been used locally as an application in rheumatism, and as an ointment to destroy lice and itch-mites, s., fluidextract of (fluidextractum staphisagria, U. S. P.). Dose i min. (0.06 Cc.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      staphisagria (staf-is-a'grf-ah) [G. sfaphis, raisin, + agria, fern, of agrios, wild.] (U.S.) StaphisagrUe semina (Br.). Stavesacre, larkspur; the dried ripe seed of Delphinium staphisagria, a plant of southern Europe; employed locally for the destruction of pediculi and in scabies.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      staphisagria (staf-is-a'grf-ah) [G. sfaphis, raisin, + agria, fern, of agrios, wild.] (U.S.) StaphisagrUe semina (Br.). Stavesacre, larkspur; the dried ripe seed of Delphinium staphisagria, a plant of southern Europe; employed locally for the destruction of pediculi and in scabies.
  283. staphisagrine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      staphisagrine (sta-Jis-a'-gren) [vraflt, dried grape; A-ypiot, wild]. An amorphous alkaloid obtained from staphisagria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      staphis'agrine. An alkaloid, C>SH,,NO,, or a mixture of alkaloids, from staphisagria; it is said to be an antidote to strophanthin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      staphis'agrine. An alkaloid, C>SH,,NO,, or a mixture of alkaloids, from staphisagria; it is said to be an antidote to strophanthin.
  284. staphyline - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      staphyline ($taf-il-in) [paialine glands.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      staphyline (stafl-lln) [G. staphyll, a bunch of grapes, the uvula.] i. Resembling a bunch of grapes, botryoid. a. Relating to the uvula, uvular.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      staphyline (stafl-lln) [G. staphyll, a bunch of grapes, the uvula.] i. Resembling a bunch of grapes, botryoid. a. Relating to the uvula, uvular.
  285. staphylinus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      staphylinus (staf-il-i'-nus) [staphyle]. i. Palatal. 2. See 5. medius, s. ezternus, the tensor palati. s. internus, the levator palati. s. medius, the azygos uvulae muscle. See under muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      staphyli'nus. See under musculus.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      staphylinus (sta-fi-li'nus). See table of muscles, under muscle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      staphyli'nus. See under musculus.
  286. staphylolysin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      staphylolysin '(staf-il-ol'-if-in) [staphylococcus; \\-tiv, to loosen]. Neisser and Wechsberg's narr.e for a hemoiysin produced by Staphylococcus aureus and 5. albus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      staphylol'ysin. i. An hemolysin excreted by a Staphylococcus. 2. An antibody causing lysis of staphylococci.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      staphylol'ysin. i. An hemolysin excreted by a Staphylococcus. 2. An antibody causing lysis of staphylococci.
  287. staphyloma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      staphyloma (.\taf-il-o'-mah) [cr«^XwM«. a defect . in the eye). A bulging of the cornea or sclera of the eye. s. equatoriale, s. aequatoris, s., equatorial, staphyloma of the sclera in the equatorial region, s., annular, one surrounded on all sides by atrophic choroid. s., anterior. See keratoglobus. s.» ciliary, one In the region of the ciliary body. s. corneas, a bulging of the cornea due to a thinning of the membrane with or without previous ulceration. s.t intercalary, one developing in that region of the sclera which is united with the periphery of the iris. s., posterior, s. posticum, a backward bulging of the sclerotic coat at the posterior pole of the eye. s , Scarpa's, posterior staphyloma; staphyloma of the posterior segment of the sclera. s. uveale, thickening of the Iris. Syn., iridoncosis,
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      staphylo'ma [G.] A bulging of the cornea or sclera due to inflammatory softening, ann'ular s., a s. extending around the periphery of the cornea. ante'rior a., a bulging near the anterior pole of the eyeball, cor'neal B., keratoconus, keratoglobus. cil'lary a., scleral s. at the part where this coat is covered by the ciliary body, equato'rial a., bulging of the sclera on one of the lateral aspects of the eyeball, intercal'ary a., a scleral a. anterior to the insertion of the ciliary body. poste'rior s., a protrusion of the sclera at the temporal side of the optic disc, scleral a., equatorial s. or posterior s. u'veal a., iridonc'
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      staphyloma (staf-il-o'mah). A more or less irregular protrusion of some one of the tunics of the eye, due to a thinning or to a perforation from previous ulceration, anterior s. See s. comae, ciliary s. S. scleroticae in the ciliary region, due to intraocular inflammation usually affecting the uveal tract, posterior s. i. See s. scleroticae. 2. See covus (2d def.). s. corneae. A bulging of the cornea, in whole or in part, from thinning of the membrane, with or without a preceding ulceration, due to injury or to a chronic inflammation of the cornea and usually of the iris, with abolition of the anterior chamber, adhesion of the iris to the posterior surface of the cornea, and increased tension. The cornea is opaque and occasionally thickened instead of thinned. According to some, the term is restricted to protrusion originating in prolapse of the iris and consisting of the iridic tissue replacing the cornea, s. scleroticae. A bulging of the sclerotic at any portion of its circumference, from thinning of the membrane due to longcontinued intra-ocular inflammation with increased pressure, [dr., staphyloma, from staphyle, a bunch of grapes, + oma, tumor.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      staphylo'ma [G.] A bulging of the cornea or sclera due to inflammatory softening, ann'ular s., a s. extending around the periphery of the cornea. ante'rior a., a bulging near the anterior pole of the eyeball, cor'neal B., keratoconus, keratoglobus. cil'lary a., scleral s. at the part where this coat is covered by the ciliary body, equato'rial a., bulging of the sclera on one of the lateral aspects of the eyeball, intercal'ary a., a scleral a. anterior to the insertion of the ciliary body. poste'rior s., a protrusion of the sclera at the temporal side of the optic disc, scleral a., equatorial s. or posterior s. u'veal a., iridonc'
  288. staphylorrhaphy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      staphylorrhaphy (staf-il-or1-a-ft) [staphylo-; fxuM, suture]. Suture of a cleft soft palate.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      staphylorrhaphy (staf-il-or'raf-e). Tie operation of closing a cleft of the vekra palati. [Gr., staphyle, the uvula, raphe, a sewing.]
  289. staphylotome - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      staphylotome (staf-il-o-tom) [staphylo-; To/i^, a cutting). A cutting instrument used in staphylotomy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      staphylotome (staf'il-o-tom) [G. staphyli, uvula, + tomos, cutting.] A guillotine or knife for removing the uvula.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      staphylotome (staf'il-o-tom) [G. staphyli, uvula, + tomos, cutting.] A guillotine or knife for removing the uvula.
  290. staphylotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      staphylotomy (staf'-il-ot-o-me) [staphylo-; r./p n, a cutting), i. The operation of incising or removing the uvula. 2. The operation of incising a staphyloma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      staphylot'omy [G. staphyle, uvula, + tome, incision.] I. Amputation of, or any cutting operation on, the uvula. a. Cutting away a staphyloma.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      staphylotomy (staf-il-ot'o-mi). 1. Amputation of the uvula. 2. Abscission of a staphyloma. [Gr., staphyle, the urck. + tome, cutting.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      staphylot'omy [G. staphyle, uvula, + tome, incision.] I. Amputation of, or any cutting operation on, the uvula. a. Cutting away a staphyloma.
  291. staphylotoxin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      staphylotoxin (staf-il-o-toks'-in). See staphylolysin,
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      staphylotoxin (stafil-o-toks'in). A tecproduced by the Staphylococcus, whxi causes necrotic changes in the viscerastar. See aster, daughter s., double s. See amphiaster. mother s. See csw polar s's. Radiating masses of tit granules of the cell protoplasm dunw karyokinesis, seen at the poles 01" u; nuclear spindles.
  292. star-anise - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      star-an'ise. Illicium.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      star-an'ise. Illicium.
  293. stasibasiphobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stasibasiphobia (sta-se-ba-se-fo'-be-aK) [ffr&tra, standing; $fura, a step, walk; 060or, fear]. A peculiar fear in consequence of which the act of walking or of standing becomes impossible.
  294. stasimorphy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stasimorphy \stas'-e-mor-fe) [stasis; ftop&i* form]. Deviation from the normal from arrest of development.
  295. stasiphobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stasiphobia (stas-i-fo'-be-ak) [stasis; &.pj. fear]. Fear of standing upright.
  296. statuvolence - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      statuvolence (stat-u'vo-lens) [L. sta'tus state + vo'lens willing). A voluntary self-induced state of hypnotism.
  297. steapsin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      steapsin (sle-ap'-sin) [rriap, fat]. A ferment of the pancreatic juice which causes fats to combine with an additional molecule of water and then split into glycerin and their corresponding acids; lipase.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      steapsin (ste-ap'sin) [probably G. stear, tallow.] A steatolytic enzyme in the pancreatic juice, which converts the neutral fats into fatty acids and glycerin; lipase.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      steapsin (ste-ap'sin) [probably G. stear, tallow.] A steatolytic enzyme in the pancreatic juice, which converts the neutral fats into fatty acids and glycerin; lipase.
  298. stearoptene - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stearoptene (ste-ar-op'-ten) [ariap, fat; mirk, winged; volatile]. The crystalline substance occurring naturally in solution in a volatile oil.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stearoptene (ste-ar-op'ten) [G. siear, tallow, + ptlnos, winged.] A tough, crystalline solid which separates out from a volatile oil which has been standing for some time or has been subjected to cold; sometimes called a camphor.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stearoptene (ste-ar-op'ten) [G. siear, tallow, + ptlnos, winged.] A tough, crystalline solid which separates out from a volatile oil which has been standing for some time or has been subjected to cold; sometimes called a camphor.
  299. stearrhea - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      stearrhea (ste-ar-re'ah). Another name for seborrhea. [Gr., stear, fat, + roia, a flowing.]
  300. stearyl - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stearyl (stf-ar-it) [irriap, fat; t\v, matter], CuHiiO. The radical of stearic acid.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      stearyl (ste'ar-il). The univalent radicle, CnHwCO, of stearic acid.
  301. steatolysis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      steatolysis (ste-at-ol'-is-is) [steato-; Xfaru, solution]. The emulsifying process by which fats are prepared for absorption and assimilation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      steatolysis (ste-a-tol'1-sis) [G. stear(steal-), tallow, + lysis, solution.] The hydrolysis or emulsion of fat in the process of digestion.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      steatolysis (ste-a-tol'1-sis) [G. stear(steal-), tallow, + lysis, solution.] The hydrolysis or emulsion of fat in the process of digestion.
  302. steatoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      steatoma (ste-at-o'-mah) [steato-; Spa, tumor].
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      steatoma (ste-a-to'mah) [G. sifar(steal-), tallow, + -dma.] i. A fatty tumor, lipoma. 2. A sebaceous cyst.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      steatoma (ste-at-o'mah). Another name for sebaceous cyst. [Gr., stear, fat, + oma, tumor.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      steatoma (ste-a-to'mah) [G. sifar(steal-), tallow, + -dma.] i. A fatty tumor, lipoma. 2. A sebaceous cyst.
  303. stegnotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stegnotic (steg-not'-ik). Effecting stegnosis. Astringent.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stegnot'ic. i. Astringent, constipating. 3. An astringent agent, one checking secretion or causing constipation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stegnot'ic. i. Astringent, constipating. 3. An astringent agent, one checking secretion or causing constipation.
  304. stenosed - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stenosed (sten-ozd'). Narrowed, contracted, strictured.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stenosed (ste-nozd'). Affected with stenosis or constriction.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stenosed (sten-ozd'). Narrowed, contracted, strictured.
  305. stentorin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stentorin (sttn'-to-rin). A blue pigment obtained from infusorians of the genus Stentor.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stentorin (sten'to-rin). A blue pigment from protozoans of the genus Stenlar.
  306. stephanial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stephanial (stef-a'ne-al). Pertaining to the stephanion.
  307. stephanion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stephanion (stef-an'-e-on) [crvpavot, a wreath: crown]. The point of intersection of the temporal ridge and coronal suture. See under craniometric point. •
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stepha'nion [G. dim. of Stephanos, wreath, crown.] A craniometric point where the coronal suture intersects the temporal crest (Imea temporalis).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      stephanion (stef-a'ne-on). The point where the coronal suture crosses the temporal ridge. [Gr., stephanion, dim. of Stephanos, crown.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stephanion (stef-a'ne-on) [Gr. <rr<va»of crown). The point at the intersection of the temporal ridge and the cranial suture.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stepha'nion [G. dim. of Stephanos, wreath, crown.] A craniometric point where the coronal suture intersects the temporal crest (Imea temporalis).
  308. steppage - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stepp'age [Fr.] The peculiar gait of suSerers iron diabetic neuritis of the peroneal nerve and from tabes dorsalis; in consequence of this dorsal flexion of the foot is impossible, and the patient in walking is obliged to raise the foot very high in order to clear the ground with the drooping toes.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stepp'age [Fr.] The peculiar gait of suSerers iron diabetic neuritis of the peroneal nerve and from tabes dorsalis; in consequence of this dorsal flexion of the foot is impossible, and the patient in walking is obliged to raise the foot very high in order to clear the ground with the drooping toes.
  309. stercoral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stercoral (ster'-ko-raV). See stercoraceous.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ster'coral. Stercoraceous, stercorous. 8. ulcer, an ulcer of the colon caused by the pressure of inspissated fecal masses.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ster'coral. Stercoraceous, stercorous. 8. ulcer, an ulcer of the colon caused by the pressure of inspissated fecal masses.
  310. stercorin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stercorin (sler'-ko-rin) [stercus]. An extractive from the feces resembling choiesterin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ster'corin. A substance resembling cholesterin, derived from feces.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ster'corin. A substance resembling cholesterin, derived from feces.
  311. stercorolith - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stercorolith (ster'ko-ro-lith) [L. ster'cus dung + Gr. XWtos stone]. Same as fecaiith.
  312. stercorous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stercorous (ster'ko-rus) [L. stercoro'stu]. Of the nature of excrement.
  313. stereognostic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stereognostic (ster-e-og-nos'-tik) [see stereognosis]. I. Pertaining to the cognition of solidity, or tndimensiona 1 forms. 2. Recognizing by sense of touch.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stereognos'tic. Relating to stereognosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stereognostic (ste"re-og-nos'tik). Of or pertaining to stereognosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stereognos'tic. Relating to stereognosis.
  314. stereometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stereometer (ster-e-om'-et-er) [stereo-; utrpor, a measure]. An apparatus for the determination of the specific gravity of liquids, porous substances, powders, etc.. as well as solids.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stereometer (ster-e-om'e-tur) [G. stereos, solid, + metron, measure.] I. An instrument for measuring the capacity of a vessel or the size of a solid body. 2. An instrument for determining the specific gravity of a liquid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stereometer (ste-re-om'et-er) [Gr. <rrcpc6: solid - iii rjn'j' measure]. An instrument for performing stereometry.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stereometer (ster-e-om'e-tur) [G. stereos, solid, + metron, measure.] I. An instrument for measuring the capacity of a vessel or the size of a solid body. 2. An instrument for determining the specific gravity of a liquid.
  315. stereoplasm - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stereoplasm (ster'-e-o-plazm) [stereo-; irXAa«w. to mold]. The solid part of the protoplasm of celts.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stereoplasm (ster'e-o-plazm) [G. stereos, solid.] The outer more solid portion of the protoplasm of a cell, especially of a protozoan.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stereoplasm (ster'e-o-plazm) [G. stereos, solid.] The outer more solid portion of the protoplasm of a cell, especially of a protozoan.
  316. sterisol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sterisol (ster'-is-ol). A preparation containing sugar of milk, 2.98 parts; sodium chloride, 0.672 part,potassium phosphate,0.322 part;formaldehyde, 0.520 part; water, 95.506 parts. Used as an antiseptic in infectious diseases. •
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sterisol (ster^is-ol). Formaldehyd, sodium phosphate, etc., in a solution of milk-sugar: an antiseptic, sternad (ster'nad). Toward the sternal surface or
  317. sternad - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sternad (ster'-nad) [sternum]. Toward the sternal aspect.
  318. sternalgia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sternalgia (ster-nal'-je-ah) [sternum; &\yot, pain]. Pain in the sternum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sternalgia (stur-nal'jt-ah) [G. sternon, sternum, 4 • (':;• "•, pain.] Pain in the sternum or the sternal region, sternodynia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sternalgia (ster-nal'je-ah) [Gr. ariovov sternum + iXyos pain]. Pain in the sternum; angina pectons.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sternalgia (stur-nal'jt-ah) [G. sternon, sternum, 4 • (':;• "•, pain.] Pain in the sternum or the sternal region, sternodynia.
  319. sternebra - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sternebra (ster'-ne-brah) [sternum; vertebra; p., sternebra]. Any one of the serial segments of the oternum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sternebra (ster'neb-rah), pi. sterne'bra [sternum + vertebra]. A sternal vertebra; any one of the segments of the sternum.
  320. sternoclavicular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sternoclavic'ular. Relating to the sternum and the clavicle; noting an articulation, and an occasional muscle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sternoclavic'ular. Relating to the sternum and the clavicle; noting an articulation, and an occasional muscle.
  321. sternocleidomastoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sternocleidomastoid (ster-no-kli-do-mas'-toid)
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sternocleidomastoid (stur*no-kli"do-mas'toyd). Relating to sternum, clavicle, and mastoid process, noting the origins and insertion of the muscle so named.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sternocleidomastoid (stur*no-kli"do-mas'toyd). Relating to sternum, clavicle, and mastoid process, noting the origins and insertion of the muscle so named.
  322. sternohyoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sternohyoid (ster-no-hi'-oid) [sterno-; hyoid\.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sternohyoid (ster-no-hi'oid). Pertaining to the sternum and to the hyoid bone. See muscles, table oj.
  323. sternomastoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sternomastoid (ster-no-mas'-toid). Relating to the sternum and the mastoid process of the temporal bone.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sternomas'toid. Relating to the sternum and the mastoid process of the temporal bone, noting the musculus* sternocleidomastoideus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sternomas'toid. Relating to the sternum and the mastoid process of the temporal bone, noting the musculus* sternocleidomastoideus.
  324. sternothyroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sternothyroid (ster-no-thi'roid). Pertaining to the sternum and to the thyroid cartilage or gland. See muscles, table of.
  325. sternutatio - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sternutatio (ster-nu-la'-she-o) [L.]. Sneezing, s. convulsive, paroxysmal sneezing, as in hay fever.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sternutatio (stur-nu-ta'shyo) [L. sternutart, stenttre, to sneeze.] Sternutation, sneezing, s- convulsi'va, paroxysmal sneezing, the sneezing of hay fever.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sternutatio (stur-nu-ta'shyo) [L. sternutart, stenttre, to sneeze.] Sternutation, sneezing, s- convulsi'va, paroxysmal sneezing, the sneezing of hay fever.
  326. stethograph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stethograph (steth'-o-graf) [stetho-; -ypd^eu-. to write]. An instrument recording the respiratory movements of the chest.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      steth'ograph [G. stethos, chest, + graphs, I record-] An apparatus for recording the respiratory movements of the chest.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stethograph (steth'o-graf) [Gr. trrifim chest -fype. to write]. An instrument for recording movements of the chest.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      steth'ograph [G. stethos, chest, + graphs, I record-] An apparatus for recording the respiratory movements of the chest.
  327. stethometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stethometer (steth-om'e-tur) [G. stethos, chest. metron, measure.] An instrument for measuring the circumference of the chest and its variations in respiration.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stethometer (steth-om'et-er) [Gr. arijftm chest _+ utrpov measure]. An instrument for measuring the circular dimension or expansion of the chest or of the abdomen.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stethometer (steth-om'e-tur) [G. stethos, chest. metron, measure.] An instrument for measuring the circumference of the chest and its variations in respiration.
  328. stethophone - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stethophone (steth'-o-fdn) [stetho-; ^0117, sound]. Stethoscope.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stethophone'(steth'o-f6n) [G. stetkos, chest, + sound.] Stethoscope.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stethophone (steth'o-ffln) [Gr. arijftm chest + ifovii voice]. A term proposed as a more accurate word for stethoscope.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stethophone'(steth'o-f6n) [G. stetkos, chest, + sound.] Stethoscope.
  329. stibialism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stibialism (stib'-e-al-izm) [stibium], Antimonial poisoning.
  330. stibiated - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stibiated (stib1-c-a-ted) [stibium, antimony]. Containing antimony.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stib'iated [L. stibium, antimony.] Impregnated with or containing antimony, antimonialized.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stib'iated [L. stibium, antimony.] Impregnated with or containing antimony, antimonialized.
  331. stichochrome - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stichochrome (stik'-o-kr6m) [arixot, a row; Xp^mq, color]. Applied by Nisslto a somatochrptne nervecell in which the chromophilic substance is arranged in striee running in the same direction and usually parallel with the contour of the cell-body, partly also with the surface of the nucleus. Cf. arkyostichochrome.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stichochrome (stik'o-krom) [G. stichos, a row, + chroma, color ] Noting a nerve-cell in which the tigroid mass, or stainable material, is arranged in roughly parallel rows or lines.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stichochrome (sti'ko-krOm) [Gr. orivn row (\)iu'(j« color). Any nerve-cell having the stain;;Mr substance (chromophilic bodies) arranged in more or less regular strue or layers.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stichochrome (stik'o-krom) [G. stichos, a row, + chroma, color ] Noting a nerve-cell in which the tigroid mass, or stainable material, is arranged in roughly parallel rows or lines.
  332. stigmal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stigmal (stig'-mal) [<rr/7M«. stigma]. Pertaining to a stigma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stig'mal. Stigmatic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stigmal (stig'mal). Pertaining to a stigma.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stig'mal. Stigmatic.
  333. stigmatism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stigmatism (stig1-mat-ism) [rrlfita, point]. I. A condition of the refractive media of the eye in which rays of light from a point are accurately brought to a focus on the retina. Synonymous with emmetropia. See, also, astigmatism. 2. The condition of having stigmata.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stig'matism. The condition of having stigmata.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stig'matism. The condition of having stigmata.
  334. still-birth - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      still-birth. The birth of a dead child.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      still-birth. The delivery of a dead fetus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      still-birth. The delivery of a dead fetus.
  335. stillicidium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stillicidium (slil-is-id'-e-um) [stilla, a drop; cadtrt, to fall down]. The flow of a liquid drop by drop, s. lacrimarum, overflow of tears from obstruction of the canaliculus or nasal duct; epiphora, s. narium, ooryza. 8. urine, dribbling of urine.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stillicidium (stil-I-sidl-um) [L. the trickling of rain; stitta, drop, + coders, to fall.] A dripping, dribbling, or falling of a liquid drop by drop. a. lacrima'rum, epiphora, a. na'rium, the discharge of watery mucus in the early stages of coryza. B. uri'n.T, incontinence of urine in cases of distended bladder; strangury.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stillicidium (stil-is-id'e-um) [L. stil'la drop + ca'dere to fall), i. A dribbling or flowing by drops. 2. Epiphora. 8. lacrima'rum, epiphora. 8. na'rium, coryza. s. uri'nte, strangury.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stillicidium (stil-I-sidl-um) [L. the trickling of rain; stitta, drop, + coders, to fall.] A dripping, dribbling, or falling of a liquid drop by drop. a. lacrima'rum, epiphora, a. na'rium, the discharge of watery mucus in the early stages of coryza. B. uri'n.T, incontinence of urine in cases of distended bladder; strangury.
  336. stillingin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stillingin (stil-in'jin). i. An alkaloid from Stillin'giconcentration prepared from Stillin'gia lylval'ica. Dose, 1-4 gr. (0.066-0.266 gm.).
  337. stirpiculture - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stirpiculture (slur-pik-ul'-lur) [slirps, stock, race; cultura, culture]. The proposed improvement of the human species by attention to the laws of br. riling.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stirpiculture (stur'pl-kul'tur) [L. stirps, stock, T cultura, cultivation.] Scientific selection in breeding in order to improve the stock.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stirpiculture (stur'pl-kul'tur) [L. stirps, stock, T cultura, cultivation.] Scientific selection in breeding in order to improve the stock.
  338. stith - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stith [an obsolete term for anvil.] Incus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stith [an obsolete term for anvil.] Incus.
  339. stomacace - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stomacace (sto-mak'-as-e) [K&xcv, evil] Canker of the mouth. Fetor of the mouth with ulcerated gums, also scorbutic sore-mouth.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stomacace (sto-mak'a-se). Stomatocace.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stomacace (sto-mak'as-e) [Gr. ar6na mouth + Koxt} badness]. Ulcerative stomatitis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stomacace (sto-mak'a-se). Stomatocace.
  340. stomachal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stomachal (stum'-ak-al) [stomach]. Pertaining to the stomach.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stomachal (stum'ak-al). Relating to the stomach.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stomachal (stum'ak-al). Pertaining to the stomach
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stomachal (stum'ak-al). Relating to the stomach.
  341. stomatological - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stomatological (sto-ma-to-lojl-kal). Relating to stomatology.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stomatological (sto-ma-to-lojl-kal). Relating to stomatology.
  342. stomatoscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stomatoscope (stom'-at-o-skop) [stomato-; viunrtiv, to inspect). An instrument for inspecting the cavity of the mouth.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sto'matoscope [G, stoma(stomat-), mouth, + skoped, I examine.] An apparatus for illuminating the interior of the mouth to facilitate examination.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stomatoscope (sto-matVskop) [Gr. nro/jn mouth t- iiHiitiiv to inspect]. A speculum for examining the mouth.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sto'matoscope [G, stoma(stomat-), mouth, + skoped, I examine.] An apparatus for illuminating the interior of the mouth to facilitate examination.
  343. stovaine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stovaine (sto-van'), CuHaNOiHCl. Amylene hydrochloride. A local anesthetic, also used in spinal anesthesia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stovaine (sto'vah-een). A local anesthetic, used especially to induce intraspinal anesthesia, ia injections of gr. J—} (0.015-0.045); chemically it is benzoyl-ethyldimethyl-aminopropanol hydr> chloride.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stovaine (sto'vah-een). A local anesthetic, used especially to induce intraspinal anesthesia, ia injections of gr. J—} (0.015-0.045); chemically it is benzoyl-ethyldimethyl-aminopropanol hydr> chloride.
  344. strabismometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      strabismometer (strab-iz-mom'-et-er). See strabomettr.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      strabismom'eter [G. strabismos + metron, measure.] An ivory plate with upper margin curved, t.i conform with the lower lid, and marked in miEimeters or fractions of an inch, used to measure the lateral deviation in squint.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      strabismometer (stra-biz-mom'et-er). An instrument for measuring the amount or degree of deviation from the normal position in a squinting eye. [Gr., strabismos, squinting, + metron, a measure.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      strabismometer (stra-biz-moro'et-er) [Gr. strabismus -)- pirpov measure). An apparatus for measuring strabismus; a strabometer.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      strabismom'eter [G. strabismos + metron, measure.] An ivory plate with upper margin curved, t.i conform with the lower lid, and marked in miEimeters or fractions of an inch, used to measure the lateral deviation in squint.
  345. strabometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      strabometer (strab-om'-et-er) [strabismus; M*rpor. measure). An instrument for the measurement of the deviation of the eyes in strabismus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      strabom'eter. Strabismometer.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      strabometer (stra-bom'et-er). See ftrMsmomcla.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      strabom'eter. Strabismometer.
  346. strait-jacket - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      strait-jacket (strat'-jak-et). See jacket.
  347. stramonium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stramonium (stra-mo'-nt-um). The thorn-apple. The stramonium of the U. S. P. is the dried leaves of Datura stramonium, Jamestown weed or jlmson-weed, a plant of the order Solanacea, It contains two alkaloids, daturine, identical with atropine, and hyoscyamine. The action of stramonium resembles that of belladonna. It is used in asthma, dysmenorrnea, neuralgia, rheumatism, and pains of syphilitic origin. In asthma the leaves may be smoked in a tobacco pipe. Locally stramonium is employed as an ointment or cataplasm in irritable ulcers and inflamed surfaces, s., extract of (extractum stramonii, U. S. P.). Dose 4 gr. (o.oi Gm.). B., flu id extract of (JluiJextractum stramonii, U. S. P.). Dose I min. (0.05 Cc.). s. ointment (unguenturn stramonii, U. S. P.), an ointment made of stramonium extract, diluted alcohol, hydrous wool-fat, and benzoinated lard, s., tincture of (linctura stramonii, U. S. P.). Dose 8 min. (0.5 Cc.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stramo'nium (U.S., Br.). The dried leaves (and ripe seeds—Br.) of Datura stramonium, thornapple, Jamestown or Jimson weed, stink-weed, an herb abounding in temperate and subtropical countries. It contains an alkaloid, daturine, resembling hyoscyamine or atropine; it is antispasmodic in doses of gr. 1—3 (0.06—0.2) and anodyne locally applied.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stramonium (stra-mo'ne-ura) [L.]. The poisonous solanaceous plant, Datu'ra stramo'nium, or jimson-weed. The leaves (stramo'nii jo'lia) and seeds (jr. sc'men) are narcotic and antispasmo<lic. Its action resembles that of belladonna. The smoke of its burning leaves is inhaled for asthma. Stramonium ointment is used for hemorrhoids, etc. The drug is serviceable in muscular rheumatism, cramp, dysmenorrhea, and spasmodic retention of the urine. Dose of fluidextract of the seeds, 1-5 min. (0.066-0.333 c.c.); of extract, 4-1 gr. (0.011-0.033 gm.); of tincture, 5-*° min. (0.333-1.333 c.c.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stramo'nium (U.S., Br.). The dried leaves (and ripe seeds—Br.) of Datura stramonium, thornapple, Jamestown or Jimson weed, stink-weed, an herb abounding in temperate and subtropical countries. It contains an alkaloid, daturine, resembling hyoscyamine or atropine; it is antispasmodic in doses of gr. 1—3 (0.06—0.2) and anodyne locally applied.
  348. streptobacillus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      streptobacillus (strep-to-bas-il'-us). A bacillus forming twisted chains.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      streptobacillus (strep-to-ba-sil'los). A bacillus growing in chains.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      streptobacillus (strep"to-bas-u"us) [Gr. crr/MX-rAt twisted + bacillus]. A variety of bacillus in the form of twisted chains of rods. One variety has been found in typhus fever. S. pellag'rte, an organism which Tizzoni claims is the cause of pellagra. 8. pseudotuberculo'sia roden'tium, the Baal'lus pseudotuberculo'su.
  349. streptothricosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      streptothricosis (strep-to-thrik-o'-sis). Infection with streptothrix.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      streptothrico'sis. i. An infectious disease caused by one or more species of Streptothrix; it is marked by a chronic suppurative inflammation, the pus containing granules composed chiefly of colonies of the causal microorganism, a. Actinomycosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      streptothricosis (strep-to-thri-ko'sis). Infection with streptothrix; a chronic disease marked by pulmonary consolidation, cassation, and cavity formation, with a tendency toward metastasis to other viscera and to the lymph-nodes.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      streptothrico'sis. i. An infectious disease caused by one or more species of Streptothrix; it is marked by a chronic suppurative inflammation, the pus containing granules composed chiefly of colonies of the causal microorganism, a. Actinomycosis.
  350. stricturotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stricturotomy (strik-tu-rot'-o-me) [see stricturotome]. The operation of incising a stricture.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stricturot'omy [L. striciura, stricture, + toml, incision.] Surgical division of a stricture.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stricturotomy (strik-tu-rot'c-me). The cutting of a stricture.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stricturot'omy [L. striciura, stricture, + toml, incision.] Surgical division of a stricture.
  351. stridulous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stridulous (strid'-u-lus) [stridor]. Characterized by stridor. s. laryngismus, see laryngismus stridulus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      strid'ulous [L. stridulus; stridere, to creak, to hiss.] Having a shrill or creaking sound.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stridulous (strid'u-lus) [L. strid'ulus]. Attended with stridor; shrill and harsh in sound.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      strid'ulous [L. stridulus; stridere, to creak, to hiss.] Having a shrill or creaking sound.
  352. strobile - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      strobile (strob'-il) (arp60i\oi. a pine-cone], i. A multiple fruit in which the seeds are enclosed by prominent scales, as a pine-cone. 2. A strobila.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      strobile (strob'il). Strobila.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      strobile (strob'il). Strobila.
  353. strobiloid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      strob'iloid [G. strobile, strobile, + eidos, resemblance.] Resembling a chain of segments of a tapeworm.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      strobiloid (stro'bil-oid). Resembling a row of tapeworm segments.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      strob'iloid [G. strobile, strobile, + eidos, resemblance.] Resembling a chain of segments of a tapeworm.
  354. stromatic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stromatic (slro-mat'-ik). Resembling a stroma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stromat'ic. Stromal.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stromat'ic. Stromal.
  355. strongylosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      strongylosis (stron-jil-o'-sis). Infection with worms of the genus Strongylus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      strongylosis (stron-jl-lo'sis). Infestation with a species of Strongylus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      strongylosis (stron-jil-o'sis). Infection with worms of the genus Strongylus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      strongylosis (stron-jl-lo'sis). Infestation with a species of Strongylus.
  356. strontia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      strontia (slron'-she-ah). Strontium oxide.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      strontia (stron'shl-ah). Strontium oxide, SrO.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      strontia (stron'shl-ah). Strontium oxide, SrO.
  357. strophanthin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      strophanthin (sir of-an'-thin) [strophanthus] Strophanlhinum (U. S. P.), C»Ht«Oii>. A toxic glucoside, soluble in water and alcohol, derived from strophanthus. Dose 9fa-fin 6""- (0.0002-0.0003 Gm.). a. tannate, a yellowish, amorphous powder containing 59% of strophanthin. soluble in water; used as a heart tonic. Dose i^crd* sr. (0.0004-0.001) Gm.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      strophanthin (stro-fan'thin). An intensely bitter glucosid obtained from Strophan~ thus, which has a digitalis action. The U. S. Ph. recognizes only that obtained from Strophanthus Kombc, but the s. of commerce is obtained largely from other species of Strophanthus. S. is freely soluble in water and may be used intravenously, or intramuscularly, but the subcutaneous injection of it is quite painful. It is much less active when given by the mouth than when injected by either the veins or the muscles. The oral dose for man has never been determined with any degree of precision, crystalline s. A name applied to ouabain. gratns 8. A name applied to ouabain or to crystalline s. obtained from s. gratus. Also written g.-strophanthin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      strophanthin (stro-fan'thin). A poisonous, white, crystalline glucosid, CjoHMO10, from strophuithus. It is soluble in water and alcohol, and is used as a heart tonic. It is very powerful, and should be employed with the utmost caution. Dose, jfor-ifai Bt- (0.0002-0.0003 gm.).
  358. strophulus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      strophulus (strof'-u-lus) {arptyot, a twisted band]. A form of miliaria occurring in infants. Syn., red •gum ; tooth-rash, s. albidus, same as milium. s. confertus, see s. intfrtinctus. s. infuntum, an urtir, trial disease of infants, s. intertinctus, a popular dermatitis of more or less acute form, a variety of eczema common in infants, s. puriginosus, an eruption occurring in children, and characterized by disseminated, intensely itching papules, a. volaticus, an acute skin disease, a typical erythema papula turn, characterized by slight macula?.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      strophulus (strof u-lus) [L. dim. of siroph*^ colic.J Red gum, gum rash, lichen infantum; rniliaria* rubra, sometimes associated with intestinal disturbances, occurring in infants, s. al'bidns [L. whitish], milium. s. can'didns JL. dazzling white], a form in which the papules are colorless- and shining. B. intertinc'tus, s. prurigino'sus, a form marked by much itching. s. volat'icus, wildfire rash,* a fugitive miliary eruption, coming and going without apparent cause and without marked general symptoms
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      strophulus .(strof'u-Ius). Another name for miliaria rubra, e. alliiilus. Another name for milium. s. pruriglneux. Another name for prurigo. [Lat., dim. of slrophus, from Gr., strophos, twisted.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      strophulus (strof'u-lus) [L.]. A papular eruption of infants, called tooth-rash or gum-rash, of several varieties, a. al bus, a variety known as white .gum, or milium. s. can'diduB, a variety of strophulus in which the papula; are larger, are not inflamed, but have a smooth, shining surface, which gives them a lighter color than the cuticle near them. a. confer'tua, a variety with crowded papillae, a. inter/tine'tua, spotted strophulus, or red gum: a form in which the child's skin appears like cotton printed with red. a. prurigino'aus, a form characterized by intensely itching papules: seen chiefly in children, a. volat'icus, flying strophulus, or wildfire rash, a form characterized by a fugitive eruption.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      strophulus (strof u-lus) [L. dim. of siroph*^ colic.J Red gum, gum rash, lichen infantum; rniliaria* rubra, sometimes associated with intestinal disturbances, occurring in infants, s. al'bidns [L. whitish], milium. s. can'didns JL. dazzling white], a form in which the papules are colorless- and shining. B. intertinc'tus, s. prurigino'sus, a form marked by much itching. s. volat'icus, wildfire rash,* a fugitive miliary eruption, coming and going without apparent cause and without marked general symptoms
  359. strumectomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      strumectomy (stroo-mek'-to-mt) [struma; £crop^, excision]. Excision of an enlarged or strumous gland, or of a goiter.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      strumectomy (stru-mek'to-m!) [L. struma + G. eklome, excision.] I. Excision of a scrofulous gland. 3. Surgical removal of all or a portion of a goitrous tumor.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      strumectomy (stru-mek'to-m!) [L. struma + G. eklome, excision.] I. Excision of a scrofulous gland. 3. Surgical removal of all or a portion of a goitrous tumor.
  360. strumiform - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      strumiform (stroo'-mif-orm) [struma; forma, form]. Having the appearance of struma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      strumiform (stru'mi-form) [L. struma + forma, form.] I. Resembling scrofula. 2. Resembling a goiter.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      strumiform (stru'mif-orm) [L. slru'ma scrofula -f- Jor'ma shape]. Resembling struma.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      strumiform (stru'mi-form) [L. struma + forma, form.] I. Resembling scrofula. 2. Resembling a goiter.
  361. strumous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      strumous (stroo'-mus) [stritmtt]. X Scrofulous. 2. Goitrous.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stru'mous. i. Scrofulous. 2. Goitrous.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      strumous (stru'mus). Pertaining to. a! fected with, or of the nature of strunu[Lat., strumosus.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stru'mous. i. Scrofulous. 2. Goitrous.
  362. strychnia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      strychnia (strik'-ne-ah) . Same as strychnine.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      strychnia (strik'ne-ah). See strychnin.
  363. strychninism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      strychninism (strik'-nin-ism) [strychnine]. The state of being under the influence of strychnine.
  364. strychninization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      strychninization (strik-nin-it-a'-shun) [strychnine], The condition produced by large doses of strychnine or nux vomica.
  365. strychninize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      strychninize (strik'nen-Iz). To bring under the influence of strychnine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      strychninize (strik'nen-Iz). To bring under the influence of strychnine.
  366. strychnism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      strychnism (strik1-nizm). Same as slrychninism.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      strychnism (strik'nizm). Strychninism.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      strychnism (strik'nizm). Strychninism.
  367. styloglossus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      styloglos'sus [G. gldssa, tongue.] Relating to the styloid process and the tongue; see under musculus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      styloglos'sus [G. gldssa, tongue.] Relating to the styloid process and the tongue; see under musculus.
  368. stylohyoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stylohyoid Isti-lo-hi'-oid) [stylo-: hyoid]. I. Per-, taining to the styloid process of the temporal bone and the hyoid bone, as the stylohyoid muscle. See under musclt. 2. Pertaining to the stylohyoid muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      stylohyoid (sti-lo-hi'oid). Pertaining to the styloid process and to the hyoid bone; also pertaining to the stylohyoid muscle.
  369. stylomastoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stylomastoid (sti-la-mas'-laid) [stylo-; ma*loid}. Pertaining to the styloid and mastoid processes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stylomas'toid. Relating to the styloid and the mastoid processes of the temporal bone; noting especially a small artery and a foramen.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stylomas'toid. Relating to the styloid and the mastoid processes of the temporal bone; noting especially a small artery and a foramen.
  370. stylopharyngeus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stylopharyngeus (sti-lo-far-in-je'-us). See under muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stylopharynge'us. See under musculus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stylopharynge'us. See under musculus.
  371. stylostixis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stylostixis (sli-lo-stiks'-is). See acupuncture.
  372. stype - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      stype (sup or sli-pe) [arliTri, tow]. A tampon or pledget, especially such as is used in producing local anesthesia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      stype [G. stype, tow.] A tampon.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      stype [G. stype, tow.] A tampon.
  373. styracin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      styracin (sti'-ra-sin). See under slyrax.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sty'racin. Cinnamyl cinnamate, C,H,.C,HTOj, a crystalline constituent of styrax.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sty'racin. Cinnamyl cinnamate, C,H,.C,HTOj, a crystalline constituent of styrax.
  374. styrone - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      styrone (stf-rdn) [sturax], Cinnamic alcohol, t. crystals, B , crystallized, cinnamic alcohol.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      styrone (sti'ron). 1. Cinnamic alcohol. 2. An antiseptic compound of storax and balsam of Peru.
  375. subabdominal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subabdom'inal. Below the abdomen, subabdominoperitoneal (sub-ab-dom*I-no-per-!-to
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subabdom'inal. Below the abdomen, subabdominoperitoneal (sub-ab-dom*I-no-per-!-to
  376. subalimentation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subalimentation (sub-al-im-en-ta'shun). InsufIh »/ni nourishment.
  377. subanconeus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subanconeus (sub-an-ko-ne'-us). See under muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subanconeus (sub-an-ko-ne'us). See muscles, table of.
  378. subarcuate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subarcuate (sub-ar'-ku-al) [sub-; arcus, an are). Slightly arcuate.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subarcuate (sub-ar'ku-at) [L. sub under + arcua'tus arched]. Somewhat arched or bent.
  379. subastringent - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subastringent (sub-as-trin'-gent) [sub-; astrixjent. astringent]. Only slightly astringent.
  380. subaural - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subaural (sub-aw'-raT) [sitb-; aura, ear]. Beneath the ear.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subaural (sub-aw'ral). Situated beneath the ear.
  381. subaxillary - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subaxillary (sub-alts'-il-a-re) [sub-; axilla]. Situated below the axilla.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subaxillary (sub-ak'sil-a-re). Below the armpit.
  382. subbrachial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subbrachial (sub-bra'ke-al). Beneath the brachium (in cerebral anatomy).
  383. subcartilaginous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subcartilaginous (sub-kor-iil-aj'-in-us) [sub-; cartilago, cartilage]. I. Situated beneath cartilage. 2. Partly cartilaginous.
  384. subclavian - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subclavian (.sub-kla'-ve-ani [sub-; clams, keyj. Lying under the dasubclavian artery.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subcla'vian. Beneath the clavicle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subclavian (sub-kla've-an). Situated under the clavicle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subcla'vian. Beneath the clavicle.
  385. subclavicular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subclavicular (sub-kla -vilr -u-lar) Beneath the clavicle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subclavic'ular. Subclavian.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subclavicular (sub"kla-vik'u-lar). Situated under the clavicle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subclavic'ular. Subclavian.
  386. subclavius - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subclavius (sub-kia'-m-us). See under muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subcla'vius. See under musculus.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      subclavius (sub-cla've-us). See table of muscles, under muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subclavius (sub-kla've-us) [L.]. See muscles, table of.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subcla'vius. See under musculus.
  387. subcostal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subcostal (sub-kos'-tal) [sub-; rosta, rib]. Lying beneath a rib or the ribs.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subcos'tal [L. costa, rib.] Beneath the ribs, noting a number of arteries and grooves.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subcostal (sub-kos'tal). Situated beneath a costa or rib.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subcos'tal [L. costa, rib.] Beneath the ribs, noting a number of arteries and grooves.
  388. subcranial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subcranial cranium]. Situated beneath the cranium.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subcra'nial. Beneath or below the cranium.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subcra'nial. Beneath or below the cranium.
  389. subcrureus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subcrureus (sub-kroo-re'-us). See under muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subcrureus (sub-kru-re'us). See muscles, table of.
  390. subcuticular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subcuticular (sub-ku-tik'-u-lar) [sub-; cutis, skin]. Beneath the epidermis, as a subcuticular suture.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subcutic'ular. Beneath the cuticle or epidermis, subepidermic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subcuticular (sub-ku-tik'u-lar). Situated beneath the epidermis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subcutic'ular. Beneath the cuticle or epidermis, subepidermic.
  391. subcutis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subcutis (sub-ku'-tis) [sub-; cutis, skin]. The deeper portion or layer of the true skin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subcu'tis. i. The corium or true skin. 2. The subcutaneous connective tissue.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subcu'tis. i. The corium or true skin. 2. The subcutaneous connective tissue.
  392. subdorsal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subdorsal (sub-dor'-sal) [sub-; dorsum, back]. Situated on the side of or below the dorsal surface of the body.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subdorsal (subKlor'sal). Situated below the dorsal region.
  393. subfebrile - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subfebrile (sub-feb'-ril) [sub-; febris. fever]. Slightly febrile.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      subfebrile (sub-feb'ril). Mildly febrile.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subfebrile (sub-feb'rll). Somewhat febrile.
  394. subhyoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subhyoid (sub-hi'-oid) [sub-; hyoid}. Beneath the hyoid bone. s. buna, a bursa lying between the thyrohyoid membrane and hyoid bone and the conjoint insertion of the onohyoid, sternohyoid, amd stylohyoid muscles. Syn., Bayer's bursa.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subhyoid (sub-hi'oid). Subhyoidean.
  395. subiculum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subiculum (sub-ik'-u-liim) [subext a layer]. The uncinate gyrus. s. promontorii, support of the promontory; the posterior boundary of the fenestra vestibuli.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subiculum (su-bik'u-lum) [L. subex(subic-), a layer.] The uncinate gyre, uncus gyri hippocampi [BNA]. s. promonto'rii, support of the promontory; a bony ridge bounding the fenestra vestibuli posteriorly.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subiculum (su-bik'u-lum) [L. subex(subic-), a layer.] The uncinate gyre, uncus gyri hippocampi [BNA]. s. promonto'rii, support of the promontory; a bony ridge bounding the fenestra vestibuli posteriorly.
  396. subincision - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subincision (sub-in-sizh'un) [L. sub under : incid'cre to cut]. The creation of an opening into the urethra on the under side of the penis; a custom common among various savage and barbarous races. It does not render coitus unfruitful.
  397. subintrant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subin'trant [L. subintrare, to steal into.] Noting a malarial paroxysm which anticipates, or returns before its proper time, to such an extent that its first symptoms are manifested before the previous paroxysm has entirely disappeared.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      subintrant (sub-in'trant). Obs. Of a fever, having a second paroxysm begin before the first has wholly subsided. [Lat., subintrarc. to go into secretly.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subintrant (sub-in'trant) [L. subin'lrans entering by stealth], i. Beginning before the completion of a previous cycle or paroxysm; anticipating. 2. Characterized by anticipating recurrences.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subin'trant [L. subintrare, to steal into.] Noting a malarial paroxysm which anticipates, or returns before its proper time, to such an extent that its first symptoms are manifested before the previous paroxysm has entirely disappeared.
  398. subinvolution - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subinvolution (sub-in-vo-lu'-shun) [sub-; involutio, a rolling up). Imperfect involution, s. of the uterus, the imperfect contraction of the uterus after delivery.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subinvolu'tion. An arrest in the normal involution of the uterus following childbirth, the organ remaining abnormally large.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      subinvolution (sub-in-vo-lu'shun). Incomplete involution; failure of an organ to return to its normal size or condition after a physiological hypertrophy, e. g., s. of the uterus after delivery. [Lat., sub, under, + involutio, a rolling up.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subinvolu'tion. An arrest in the normal involution of the uterus following childbirth, the organ remaining abnormally large.
  399. sublimis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sublimis (sub-li'-mis) [L.]. Elevated; superficial, a qualification applied to certain muscles.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subli'mis [L.] At the top; on the surface; superficial.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subli'mis [L.] At the top; on the surface; superficial.
  400. submaxillary - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      submaxillary (sub-maks'-il-a-re) [sub-; maxilla]. I. Lying beneath the lower maxilla, as the submaxillary gland. 2. Pertaining to the submaxillary gland.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      submax'illary. i. Mandibular. 2. Beneath the lower jaw, noting a salivary gland and its duct, lymph glands, an artery and vein, a nerve, a fossa (fovea*), and a triangle of the neck.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      submax'illary. i. Mandibular. 2. Beneath the lower jaw, noting a salivary gland and its duct, lymph glands, an artery and vein, a nerve, a fossa (fovea*), and a triangle of the neck.
  401. submedial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      submedial (sub-me'-de-al) [sub-; medius. middle]. Situated beneath or near the middle.
  402. submental - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      submental (sub-men'-tal) [sub-; mentum. chin]. Situated under the chin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      submen'tal [L. sub, under, + mentum, chin.] Beneath the chin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      submen'tal [L. sub, under, + mentum, chin.] Beneath the chin.
  403. submucosa - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      submucosa (sub-mu-ko'-sah) [sub-; mucosus, mucous]. The layer of fibrous connective tissue that attaches the mucous membrane to the subjacent parts.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      submucosa (sub-mu-ko'sah). The areol; tissue immediately beneath a muco membrane.
  404. submucous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      submucous (sub-mu'-kus) [sub-; mucous]. Situated beneath a mucous membrane.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      submu'cous. Beneath a mucous membrane.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      submu'cous. Beneath a mucous membrane.
  405. subneural - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subneural (sub-nu'-ral) [sub-; vcvpor, nerve]. Situated under the neuron or under a nerve, s. gland, the homologue in the amphioxus of the hypophysis of higher vertebrates.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subneu'ral [L. sub, under, + neuron, nerve.] Below the neural axis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subneu'ral [L. sub, under, + neuron, nerve.] Below the neural axis.
  406. subnotochordal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subnotochordal (sub-no-to-kor'dal). Below tht notochord.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subnotochordal (sub-no-to-kor'dal). Below tht notochord.
  407. suboccipital - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      suboccipital (sub-ok-sip'-it-al) [sub-; occiput]. Situated beneath the occiput.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      suboccip'ital. Below the occiput or the occipital bone.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      suboccip'ital. Below the occiput or the occipital bone.
  408. suboperculum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      suboperculum (sub-o-pcr'-ku-lum) [sub-; opcrculum, lid]. A gyrus of the brain between the presylvian and subsylvian fissures; the orbital operculum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      suboper'culum. The orbital operculum.*
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      suboper'culum. The orbital operculum.*
  409. subpatellar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subpatellar (sub-pat-el'-ar) [sub-; patella, kneecap]. Situated beneath the patella.
  410. subpectoral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subpectoral (sub-pek'-tor-al) [sub-; pectus, chest]. Situated beneath the chest.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subpec'toral. Beneath the pectoralis muscle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subpec'toral. Beneath the pectoralis muscle.
  411. subphrenic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subphrenic (±ub-frrn'-ik). Synonym of subdiaphraematic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subphren'ic [L. sub, under, + G. fhren, diaphragm.] Subdiaphragmatic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subphrenic (sub-fren'ik). Situated beneath or under the diaphragm.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subphren'ic [L. sub, under, + G. fhren, diaphragm.] Subdiaphragmatic.
  412. subretinal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subretinal (sub-ret'-in-af) [sub-; retina]. Beneath the retina.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subret'inal. Beneath, on the outer side of, the retina.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subretinal (sub-ret'in-al). Situated below the retina.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subret'inal. Beneath, on the outer side of, the retina.
  413. subsalt - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subsalt'. A basic salt, one in which the base has one or more unsaturated molecules still capable of combining with the acid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subsalt (sub'sawlt). Any basic salt.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subsalt'. A basic salt, one in which the base has one or more unsaturated molecules still capable of combining with the acid.
  414. subscapular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subscapular (sub-ska p'-u-ltir) [sub-; scapula ]. I. Beneath the scapula, as the subscapular muscle, or subscapularis. 2. Pertaining to the subscapular muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subscap'ular. Beneath or below the scapula.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subscapular (sub-skap'u-lar). i. Situated below or under the scapula. 2. Supplying the subscapularis muscle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subscap'ular. Beneath or below the scapula.
  415. subserous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subserous (sub-se/-rus) [sub-; sfrnus]. Beneath a serous membrane.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subserous (sub-se'rus). Situated beneath a serous membrane.
  416. subspinous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subspinous (sub-spi'-nus) [sub-; spine], I. Beneath a spine. 2. Beneath the spinal column, s. dislocation, luxation of the head of the humerus below the spine of the scapula.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subspi'nous. Infraspinous. i. Beneath any spine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subspi'nous. Infraspinous. i. Beneath any spine.
  417. subsultus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subsultus (sub-sul'-tus) [see subsultory]. A morbid jerking or twitching, s. clonus. See s. tendinum. s. tendinum, involuntary twitching of the muscles, especially of the hands and feet, seen in low fevers.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subsul'tus [L. subsilire, to start up.] A twitching or jerking, s. clonus, s. ten'dinum [L. tndo, tendon], a twitching of the tendons, especially noticeable at the wrist, occurring in low fevers.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      subsultus (sub-sul'tus). A jerking or twitching. s. tendlnum. Movements of the tendons caused by involuntary twitchings of the muscles, especially of the face and arms. [Lat., subsilire, to leap up.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subsul'tus [L. subsilire, to start up.] A twitching or jerking, s. clonus, s. ten'dinum [L. tndo, tendon], a twitching of the tendons, especially noticeable at the wrist, occurring in low fevers.
  418. subvertebral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subver'tebral. Beneath, or on the ventral side, of a vertebra or the vertebral column, subspinal.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      subvertebral (sub-ver'te-bral). Situated on the ventral side of the vertebral column.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subver'tebral. Beneath, or on the ventral side, of a vertebra or the vertebral column, subspinal.
  419. subzonal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      subzonal (sub-to'-nal) [sub-; fii-nf, zone]. Beneath the zona pellucida.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      subzo'nal. Below or beneath any zone or zona. such as the zona radiata or zona pellucida.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      subzo'nal. Below or beneath any zone or zona. such as the zona radiata or zona pellucida.
  420. succedaneous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      succedaneous (suk-sc-da'-ne-us) [succedere, to take the place of]. Relating to or acting as a succedaneum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      succeda'neous. Relating to a succedaneum, employed as a substitute.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      succedaneous (suk-se-da'ne-us). Of the nature of a succedaneum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      succeda'neous. Relating to a succedaneum, employed as a substitute.
  421. succenturiate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      succenturiate (suk-sen-tu'rt-at) [L. succentvriart, to receive into a company of soldiers, to substitute.] Substituting, accessory s. kidney, adrenal, or suprarenal body. s. placen'ta, an accessory or supernumerary placenta.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      succenturiate (suk-sen-tu'rt-at) [L. succentvriart, to receive into a company of soldiers, to substitute.] Substituting, accessory s. kidney, adrenal, or suprarenal body. s. placen'ta, an accessory or supernumerary placenta.
  422. succinol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      succinol (suk'sin-ol) [L. succinum, amber, + oleum, oil.] Refined oil of amber, employed, like other tar oils, in the treatment of various skin diseases.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      succinol (suk'sin-ol). Purified amber tar-oil, used in eczema, pruritus, and psoriasis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      succinol (suk'sin-ol) [L. succinum, amber, + oleum, oil.] Refined oil of amber, employed, like other tar oils, in the treatment of various skin diseases.
  423. succinous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      suc'cinous. Relating to amber.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      succinous (suk'sin-us). Pertaining to amber.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      suc'cinous. Relating to amber.
  424. succinum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      succinum (suk-si'-num) [L.]. Amber, a fossil resin found in the alluvial deposits of Central Europe, and thought to be derived from an extinct species of pine. It contains a volatile oil, oUum succini. used in hysteria, whooping-cough, amenorrhea. and locally as a rubefacient in chronic rheumatism, whooping-cough, and infantile convulsions. Dose 5-15 min. (0.32-1.0 Cc.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      succinum (suk'se-num) [L.] Amber, a fossil resin; a volatile oil obtained by its destructive distillation is sometimes used in medicine; see oleum succini.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      succinum (suk'sin-um). Amber. See ambra. oleum sued id. 1. Crude oil of amber, produced by the dry distillation of amber. 2. Of the U. S. Ph., 1880, rectified oil of amber. It was used as an excitant and antispasmodic in flatulent dyspepsia. [Lat.. from succus, juice.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      succinum (suk'sin-um). Latin for amber.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      succinum (suk'se-num) [L.] Amber, a fossil resin; a volatile oil obtained by its destructive distillation is sometimes used in medicine; see oleum succini.
  425. succussion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      succussion (suk-kush'un). A diagnostic procedure which consists in shaking the body so as to elicit a splashing sound in a cavity containing both gas and fluid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      succussion (suk-ush'un) [L. succus'sio]. The act of shaking a patient, so as to detect the presence of a liquid in the cavities of the body, hippo era tic s., that which is performed for the diagnosis of pyopneumothorax and seropneumothorax. 8. sounds, splashing sounds heard on succussion over a distended stomach and in nydropneumothorax.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      succussion (suk-kush'un). A diagnostic procedure which consists in shaking the body so as to elicit a splashing sound in a cavity containing both gas and fluid.
  426. sucrase - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sucrase (su'kras). Same as interim.
  427. sucrate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      su'crate. A compound of sucrose.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sucrate (su'krat). A compound of cane sugar (sucrose) with a base.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sucrate (su'krat). A compound of a substance with sucrose.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      su'crate. A compound of sucrose.
  428. suctorial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      suctorial (suk-to'-re-at) [sugere, to suck]. Pertaining to, or suitable for sucking.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      suctorial (suk-to'rl-al). Relating to suction, or the act of sucking; adapted for sucking. 8. insect, a mosquito or other insect which draws blood by piercing the skin. s. pad, sucking pad, corpus* adiposum buccae.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      suctorial (suk-to're-al). Fitted for performing suction.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      suctorial (suk-to'rl-al). Relating to suction, or the act of sucking; adapted for sucking. 8. insect, a mosquito or other insect which draws blood by piercing the skin. s. pad, sucking pad, corpus* adiposum buccae.
  429. sudamen - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sudamen (su-da'-men) [sudor, sweat]. • An eruption of translucent, whitish vesicles, due to a noninflammatory disturbance of the sweat-glands, consisting in a collection of sweat in the ducts of the sweat-glands or beneath the epidermis, and occurring in fevers and profuse sweating.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sudamen (su-da'men) [L.]. See sudamina.
  430. sudamina - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sudam'ina. i. Plural of sudamen. 2. Miliaria crystallina.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sudamina (su-dam'in-ah), pi. of siukKtrSyn.: miliaria sudamina. Vesicles pr duced by sweat retained beneath the cm: ■ in consequence of occlusion of the orifices of the sweat ducts. See miliaria. [Lr. sudare, to perspire.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sudam'ina. i. Plural of sudamen. 2. Miliaria crystallina.
  431. sudatorium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sudatorium (su-dat-o'-re-um) [sudor}. i. A hotair bath. 2. A room for the administration of a hot-air bath.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sudato'rium [L. sudare, to sweat.] A hot-air or Turkish bath to induce profuse perspiration.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sudatorium (su-da-to're-um). A hot a-r bath, a sweating room.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sudatorium (su-dat-o're-urn) [L.]. i. A hot-air bath. 2. A room for the administration of hotair baths.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sudato'rium [L. sudare, to sweat.] A hot-air or Turkish bath to induce profuse perspiration.
  432. sudoral - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sudoral (su'-dor-al) [sudor]. Pertaining to or characterized by sweating.
  433. sudoresis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sudoresis (su-dor-e'-sis). Excessive sweating.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sudore'sis. Diaphoresis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sudoresis (su-dor-e'sis). Profuse sweating.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sudore'sis. Diaphoresis.
  434. sudoriparous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sudoriparous (su-dor-ip'-ar-us) [sudor; parere, to beget]. Secreting sweat.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sudoriparous (su-dor-ip'a-rus) [L. sudor, sweat, + parere, to produce.] Producing sweat. 8. gland, sweat-gland, glandula* sudoripara.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sudoriparous (su-dor-ip'ar-us) [L. su'dor sweat + par'ere to produce]. Secreting or producing sweat.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sudoriparous (su-dor-ip'a-rus) [L. sudor, sweat, + parere, to produce.] Producing sweat. 8. gland, sweat-gland, glandula* sudoripara.
  435. suint - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      suint (swinl) [Fr.j. A soapy substance rich in potash and cholesterin, derivable from sheeps1 wool. Lanolin, agnin. and potash salts are obtained from it.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      suint (swint). The fatty natural potash-soap derivable from sheep's wool: lanolin is prepared from it.
  436. sulciform - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sulciform (sul'-sif-orm) [sulcus, a furrow; forma, form]. Like a groove or sulcus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sulciform (sul'sif-orm). Formed like a groove.
  437. sulphacid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sulphacid (sulf-as'id). Thioacid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sulphacid (sulf-as'id). Thioacid.
  438. sulphanilate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sulphan'ilate. A salt of sulphanilic acid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sulphan'ilate. A salt of sulphanilic acid.
  439. sulphindigotate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sulphindigotate (sul-fin'dig-o-tat). Any salt of sulphindigotic acid.
  440. sulpho-acid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sulpho-acid (sul-fo-as'id). An acid in which sulphur displaces carbon or oxygen.
  441. sulpho-urea - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sulpho-urea (sul-fo-u're-ah). Same as tkio-urea.
  442. sulphocarbolate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sulphocarbolate (sul-fo-kar*-bo-Mi) [sulphur; carbolic}. A salt of sulphocarbolic acid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sulphocar'bolate. A salt of sulphocarbolic acid.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sulphocarbolate (sul-fo-kar'bo-lat). A salt of sulphocarbolic acid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sulphocarbolate (surfo-kar'bo-lat). Any salt of sulphocarbolic acid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sulphocar'bolate. A salt of sulphocarbolic acid.
  443. sulphocyanate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sulphocy'anate. A salt of sulphocyanic acid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sulphocyanate (sul-fo-si'an-at). Same as thiocyanate.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sulphocy'anate. A salt of sulphocyanic acid.
  444. sulphohydrate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sulphohy'drate. Sulphydrate.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sulphohydrate (sul-fo-hi'drat). Sulphydrate.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sulphohy'drate. Sulphydrate.
  445. sulphurated - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sulphurated (sul'-fu-ra-ted) [sulphur]. Combined with sulphur.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sul'phurated. Sulphureted.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sulphurated (sul'fur-a-ted). Contains? or combined with sulphur.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sul'phurated. Sulphureted.
  446. sulphurator - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sul'phurator. An apparatus for applying the fumes of burning sulphur for disinfection or bleaching.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sul'phurator. An apparatus for applying the fumes of burning sulphur for disinfection or bleaching.
  447. sulphurine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sulphurine (sul'-fu-rln). A preparation of some of the higher sulphides of sodium and potassium with sulphur.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      sulphurine (sul'fur-en). A mixture ' sodium and potassium sulphids with »*" phur.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sulphurine (sul'fu-rln). A proprietary combination of certain of the higher sulphids of sodium and potassium with sulphur.
  448. sulphydrate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sulphy'drate. Sulphohydrate, a compound of the radical SH with another radical or element.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sulphydrate (sul-fi'drat). Any compound of a base with sulphydric acid or, more correctly, with the radical sulphydril, Ml, or hydrogen sulphid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sulphy'drate. Sulphohydrate, a compound of the radical SH with another radical or element.
  449. sumbul - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sumbul (sum'-bul). Musk-root. The sumbul of the U. S. P. is the dried rhizome and root of an undetermined plant, probably of the family Umbellifera. It contains angelic acid, CiHiOi, and a little valerianic acid, CjHioOs. It is used as a nervine in neurasthenia, hysteria, and in anemia, chronic bronchitis, etc. Dose 1-2 dr. (2-8 Cm.). s., extract of (extraclum sumbul, U. S. P.). Dose 4 gr. (0.25 Cm.). .6., fiuidextract of (iluidextractum sumbul. U. S. P.). Dose 30 min. (2 Cc.). s., tincture of (tinctura sumbul, B. P.). Dose 20 min.-l dr. (1.34.0 Cc.). . »
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sumbul (sum'bul) [Arabic]. The Fer'ula sum'bul, an umbelliferous plant of Asia; also its nervine and antispasmodic root, of a musk-like odor, which is used in neurasthenia, delirium, and hysteria. Dose of fluidextract, 10-60 min. (0.6664 c.c.); of tincture, 1-4 fl.dr. (4-16 c.c.).
  450. superacidity - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      superacidity (su-per-as-id'-it-e). See hyperacidity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      superacid'ity. Hyperacidity, an excess of acid; specifically excessive acidity of the gastric juice, hyperchlorhydria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      superacidity (su"per-as-id'it-e). Increase of the normal acidity of the gastric secretion.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      superacid'ity. Hyperacidity, an excess of acid; specifically excessive acidity of the gastric juice, hyperchlorhydria.
  451. superactivity - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      superactiv'ity. Abnormally great activity; hyperactivity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      superactivity (su-per-ak-tiv'it-e). Activity greater than normal.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      superactiv'ity. Abnormally great activity; hyperactivity.
  452. superacute - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      superacute (su"pur-a-kuf). Extremely acute, marked by great severity of symptoms and rapid progress; noting the course of a disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      superacute (su"per-ak-uf). Very acute.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      superacute (su"pur-a-kuf). Extremely acute, marked by great severity of symptoms and rapid progress; noting the course of a disease.
  453. superalimentation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      superalimentation (su-per-al-im-en-ta'-shun) [super-; alimentation]. Overfeeding.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      superalimenta'tion. Overfeeding, luxus consumption, gavage; the forcing of food upon a patient
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      superalimentation (su"per-al-im-en-ta'shun). Therapeutic treatment by excessive feeding beyond the requirements of the appetite. It is employed in wasting diseases. Called also gmagt.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      superalimenta'tion. Overfeeding, luxus consumption, gavage; the forcing of food upon a patient
  454. superciliary - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      superciliary (sSi-per-sil'-e-a-re) [super-; cilium, eyelash]. Pertaining to the eyebrow, s. entropion, incurvation of hairs of the eyebrow against the conjunctiva, s. ridges, the projecting apophyses at the anterior surface of the frontal bone.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      superciliary (su-per-sil'c-a-re) [L. suptrcilia'ris]. Pertaining to the region of the eyebrow.
  455. superexcitation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      superexcita'tion. i. The act of exciting or stimulating unduly. 3. Overstimulation; a condition of extreme excitement.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      superexcita'tion. i. The act of exciting or stimulating unduly. 3. Overstimulation; a condition of extreme excitement.
  456. superflexion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      superflexion (su-per-fltk'-shun) [super-; flexion]. Excessive flexion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      superflex'ion. Flexion beyond the normal limit.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      superflex'ion. Flexion beyond the normal limit.
  457. superfrontal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      superfrontal (su-per-frun'-taT) [super-; frons, forehead]. Superior or upper, as a fissure in the upper part of the frontal lobe of the brain.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      superfron'tal. Above or in the upper part of the frontal region; noting a sulcus in the upper part of the frontal lobe of the cerebrum, sulcus prscentralis superior.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      superfron'tal. Above or in the upper part of the frontal region; noting a sulcus in the upper part of the frontal lobe of the cerebrum, sulcus prscentralis superior.
  458. superimpregnation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      superimpregna'tion. i. Superfecundation. 3. Superfetation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      superimpregnation (su"per-im-preg-na'shun) [L. su'per over + impregnation], i. Superfecundation. 2. Superfetation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      superimpregna'tion. i. Superfecundation. 3. Superfetation.
  459. superlethal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      superlethal (su-per-le'thal). More than lethal; said of a dose of a drug that is likely to kill.
  460. superoccipital - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      superoccipital (su-per-ok-sip'-it-al) [super-; oca
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      superoccipital (su-per-ok-sip'it-al). At the upper
  461. supinator - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      su'pinator. A muscle which produces supination of the forearm; see under musculus.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      supinator (su-pi-na'tor). A muscle that effects or assists in supination of the forearm. See table of muscles, under muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      supinator (su-pin-a'tor) [L.]. See muscles, table of.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      su'pinator. A muscle which produces supination of the forearm; see under musculus.
  462. suppurative - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      suppurative (sup'-u-ra-tiv) [suppuration], i. Producing pus. 2. An agent that favors suppuration. s. fever, pyemia, g. v.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      supp'urative. Forming pus. suppurating.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      suppurative (sup'pu-ra-tiv). 1. Penr> mg to suppuration. 2. See purulent, j. Promoting suppuration.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      suppurative (sup'u-ra-tiv). Producing pus, or associated with suppuration.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      supp'urative. Forming pus. suppurating.
  463. supra-acromial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      supra-acromial (su-prdh-ak-ro'-me-at) [supra- • aeromion\. Situated above the acromion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      supra-acromial (su"prah-ak-ro'me-al). Situated above or over the acromion.
  464. supra-auricular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      supra-auricular (su-prah-a-;i'-rik'-:Above the external ear. s. point. See under craniometric point.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      supra-auric'ular. Above the auricle or pinna of the ear. s.-a. point, a craniometric point at the root of the zygoma, directly above the auricular point.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      supra-auricular (su"prah-aw-rik'u-lar). Situated above or over an auricle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      supra-auric'ular. Above the auricle or pinna of the ear. s.-a. point, a craniometric point at the root of the zygoma, directly above the auricular point.
  465. supra-axillary - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      supra-axillary [supra-; axilla]. Above the axilla.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      supra-ax'illary. Above the axilla.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      supra-axillary (su-prah-ak'sil-a-re) [L. su'pra above + axil'la armpit or axil]. Situated above the axilla.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      supra-ax'illary. Above the axilla.
  466. supra-occipital - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      supra-occipital (su"prah-ok-sip'it-al). Situated above or in the upper portion of the occiput.
  467. supra-orbital - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      supra-orbital (su-prah-or'bit-al) [L. su'pra above + or'bita orbit]. Situated above the orbit.
  468. supracerebellar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      supracerebellar (su"prah-ser-e-bel'ar). On or above the surface of the cerebellum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      supracerebellar (su"prah-ser-e-berar). On the upper surface of the cerebellum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      supracerebellar (su"prah-ser-e-bel'ar). On or above the surface of the cerebellum.
  469. suprachoroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      suprachoroid (su-prah-ko'-roid) [supra-; choroid]. Above the choroid or the choroid plexus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      suprachoroid (su-prah-ko'royd). On the outer side of the choroid of the eye. s. lam'ina, the connective tissue between the choroid and the sclerotic coats of the eye.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      suprachoroid (su-prah-ko'roid). Situated above or upon the choroid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      suprachoroid (su-prah-ko'royd). On the outer side of the choroid of the eye. s. lam'ina, the connective tissue between the choroid and the sclerotic coats of the eye.
  470. supraciliary - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      supraciliary (su-prah-sil'-e-a-re). Same as superciliary.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      supraciliary (su-prah-sU'e-a-re). Superciliary
  471. supraclavicular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      supraclavicular (su-prah-kla-vik'-u-lar) [supra-; clavicle}. Above the clavicle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      supraclavic'ular. Above the clavicle. 8. fossa, the hollow on either side of the neck dipping down behind the clavicle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      supraclavicular (su"prah-klav-ik'u-lar). Staated above the clavicle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      supraclavic'ular. Above the clavicle. 8. fossa, the hollow on either side of the neck dipping down behind the clavicle.
  472. suprahepatic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      suprahepatic (su-prah-hep-al'-ik). Above the liver. s. veins, the hepatic veins.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      suprahepat'ic [L. supra, above, + G. hlpar(hipat-), liver.] Above the liver.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      suprahepatic (su"prah-he-pat'ik). Situated above the liver.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      suprahepat'ic [L. supra, above, + G. hlpar(hipat-), liver.] Above the liver.
  473. suprahyoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      suprahyoid (su-proh-hi'-oid) [supra-; hyoid}. Above the hyoicf bone.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      suprahy'oid. Above the hyoid bone, noting certain accessory thyroid glands lying within the geniohyoid muscle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      suprahy'oid. Above the hyoid bone, noting certain accessory thyroid glands lying within the geniohyoid muscle.
  474. supraliminal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      supraliminal (su-prah-lim'-in-al) [supra-; limen, threshold]. Lying above the threshold. B. consciousness, the empirical self of common experience.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      supraliminal (su-prah-lim'in-al). Above the limen of sensation; more than just perceptible.
  475. supramaxilla - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      supramaxilla (su-prah-maks-il'-ah) [supra-; maxilla]. The supramaxillary bone. 4
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      supramaxill'a. The maxilla.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      supramaxilla (su"prah-maks-irah) [L. su'pra over -f max'illa jaw]. The upper jaw bone.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      supramaxill'a. The maxilla.
  476. supraoccipital - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      supraoccipital (su-prah-ok-sip'-it-at) [supra-; occiput], i. Above the occipital bone. 2. The upper part of the occipital bone.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      supraoccip'ital. Superoccipital.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      supraoccip'ital. Superoccipital.
  477. suprapatellar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      suprapatellar (su-prah-pat-el'-ar) [supra-; patella]. Above the patella.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      suprapatell'ar. Above the patella.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      suprapatellar (su"prah-pat-el'ar). Situated above the patella.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      suprapatell'ar. Above the patella.
  478. suprascapular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      suprascapular (su-prah-skap'-u-lar) [supra-; scapula]. Above or in the upper part of the scapula.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      suprascap'ular. Above the scapula.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      suprascap'ular. Above the scapula.
  479. supraspinous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      supraspinous (su-prah-spi'-nui) [see supraspinatus]. Above the spinous process of the scapula or of a vertebra, s. fossa, the triangular depression above the spine of the scapula.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      supraspi'nous. Above any spine, especially above one or more of the vertebral spines or the spine of the scapula.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      supraspi'nous. Above any spine, especially above one or more of the vertebral spines or the spine of the scapula.
  480. suprastapedial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      suprastapedial (su-prah-sta-pe'-de-al) [supra-; stapes]. Above the stapes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      suprastape'dial. Above the stapes.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      suprastape'dial. Above the stapes.
  481. supratemporal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      supratemporal (su-prah-lem'-po-ral) [supra-; temporal]. Above the temporal region.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      supratem'poral. Supertemporal.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      supratem'poral. Supertemporal.
  482. supratrochlear - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      supratrochlear (su-prah-trok'-le-ar) [supra-; tracklea]. Above the trochlea or pulley of the superior oblique muscle.
  483. supravaginal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      supravaginal (su-prah-vaj'in-al). Above the vagina, or above any sheath.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      supravaginal (su-prah-vaj'in-al). Above the vagina, or above any sheath.
  484. sural - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      su'ral. Relating to the calf of the leg.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      su'ral. Pertaining to the calf of the 1« [Lat, sura, the calf of the leg.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      su'ral. Relating to the calf of the leg.
  485. suralimentation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      suralimentation (sur-al-im-en-ta'-skun) [super-; alimentation]. The method of forced feeding or overalimentation sometimes employed in pulmonary tuberculosis and other diseases.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      suralimenta'tion [Fr. sur; L. super, above.] Superalimentation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      suralimenta'tion [Fr. sur; L. super, above.] Superalimentation.
  486. surdimutism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      surdimutism (ser-dim-u'tizm). Deaf-mutism.
  487. surdity - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sur'dity [L. surdttas.] Deafness.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      surdity (surMit-e) [L. sur'dilas]. Deafness.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sur'dity [L. surdttas.] Deafness.
  488. surdomute - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sur'domute. i. Deaf and dumb. a. A deafmute.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      surdomute (surMo-mut) [L. sur'dus deaf 4- mu'tus mute], i. Both deaf and dumb. 2. A deaf-mute person.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sur'domute. i. Deaf and dumb. a. A deafmute.
  489. surexcitation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      surexcitation (sur-eks-i-ta'-shun) [super-; excitatio, a rousing]. Excessive excitement.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      surexcitation (sur-ek-si-ta'shun). Excessive excitation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      surexcitation (ser"ek-slt-a'shun) [L. su'per over + excitation]. Overezcitation; excessive excitation.
  490. sursumduction - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sursumduction (sur-sum-duk'-shun) [sursum, up; ducerf, to lead], i. The power of the two eyes of fusing two images when one eye has a prism placed vertically before it. 2. See supravcrgence. 3. A movement of either eye alone upward, s., right, the absolute power that the right eye has to rotate upward.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sursumduc'tion [L. sursum, upward, + ducere, to draw.] A drawing upward, specifically the moving upward of one eye independently of its fellow.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sursumduction (sur-sum-duk'shun) [L. sur'stm up 4- du'cere to lead], i. The act of elevation of the visual axis of one eye above the other; also the degree to which such elevation can be made. The ability to elevate the axis of one or of either eye above that of the other.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sursumduc'tion [L. sursum, upward, + ducere, to draw.] A drawing upward, specifically the moving upward of one eye independently of its fellow.
  491. suscitation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      suscitation (sus-si-ta'-shun^. The act of exciting.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      suscita'tion. Excitation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      suscitation (sus-sit-a'shun) [L. suscilofHo]. An arousal or excitation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      suscita'tion. Excitation.
  492. suspensoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      suspensoid (sus-pcn'-soid). An apparent solution which is seen, by the microscope, to consist of small particles of the solute in active Brownian movement.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      suspensoid (sus-pen'soyd) [suspension + G. eidos, resemblance.] Suspension colloid; a colloid solution in which the disperse particles are solid and lyophobe or hydrophobe, and are therefore sharply demarcated from the fluid in which they are suspended; distinguished from emulsoid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      suspensoid (sus-pen'soyd) [suspension + G. eidos, resemblance.] Suspension colloid; a colloid solution in which the disperse particles are solid and lyophobe or hydrophobe, and are therefore sharply demarcated from the fluid in which they are suspended; distinguished from emulsoid.
  493. sustentacular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sustentacular (sus-ten-tak'-u-lar) [sustentaculum. sustentart. to support]. Pertaining to or serving as a sustentaculum. s. cells, a name given to certain supporting cells in the testicle, s. tissue, supporting tissue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sustentac'ular. Relating to a sustentaculum, supporting.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sustentacular (sua-ten-tak'u-Ur) [L. nutentfn to support]. Sustaining or supporting. See cell.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sustentac'ular. Relating to a sustentaculum, supporting.
  494. sustentaculum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sustentaculum (sus-trn-tak'-u-lum) [sustenlnrc, to support). A support, s. lienis, the suspensory ligament of the spleen, s. tali, a process of the os calcis supporting the astragalus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sustentac'ulum [L. a prop.] A structure which serves as a stay or support to another. B. li'enis, ligamentum phrenicocolicum, on which rests the base of the spleen. B. ta'li, support of the anklebone; a bracket-like lateral projection from the inner surface of the os calcis, the upper surface of which presents a facet for articulation with the astragalus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sustentaculum (sus-ten-tak'u-lum), pi. sustmtac'ufa [L.]. A support. 8. li'enis, the suspensory ligament of the spleen. 8. ta'li, a process of the calcaneum which supports the astragalus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sustentac'ulum [L. a prop.] A structure which serves as a stay or support to another. B. li'enis, ligamentum phrenicocolicum, on which rests the base of the spleen. B. ta'li, support of the anklebone; a bracket-like lateral projection from the inner surface of the os calcis, the upper surface of which presents a facet for articulation with the astragalus.
  495. sutural - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sutural (su'-tu-ral) [sutur*-]. Pertaining to or having the nature of a suture.
  496. suturation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sutura'tion. sutures.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sutura'tion. sutures.
  497. sweating-sickness - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sweating-sickness. An infective, febrile epidemic disorder, characterized by a rapid course and profuse perspiration. It was prevalent in England at the end of the fifteenth and first half of the sixteenth century. Syn., English sweat; miliaria; Picardy sweat; sudor anglicus; Fr., suette miliaire; Ger., schweissfreisel.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sweating-sick'ness. Miliary* fever (i).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sweating-sick'ness. Miliary* fever (i).
  498. sweeny - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sweeny (swe'-ne) [origin obscure]. A wasting, or shrinkage, of the shoulder-muscles of the horse, generally due to some lameness of the foot or foreleg; it is also called su'inney.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      swee'ny. Wasting of the muscles over the shoulderblade of a horse, caused by a sprain or by a braise from an ill-fitting collar.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sweeny (swe'ne). Atrophy of the muscles in the shoulder of a horse.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      swee'ny. Wasting of the muscles over the shoulderblade of a horse, caused by a sprain or by a braise from an ill-fitting collar.
  499. swine-fever - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      swine-fever. Hog cholera.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      swine-fever (swln-fe'ver). Hog-cholera, or pig typhoid, an infectious disease of swine, produced by the BacU'lus suipes'lifer. It is marked by fever, loss of appetite, and unwillingness to move.
  500. sycosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sycosis (si-ko'-sis) [vbtwrii, a fig-like excrescence on the flesh]. An inflammatory disease affecting the hair-follicles, particularly of the beard, and characterized by papules, pustules, and tubercles, perforated by hairs, together with infiltration of the skin and crusting. 8., bacillogcnic, a variety of so-called "non-parasitic" sycosis, ascribed to the Bacillus sycosiferus /at id us. t. bar bee, sycosis of the beard, s. capilliti;. i. Dermatitis papillaris capillitii, of
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sycosis (si-ko'sis) [G. a fungous fig-like tumor; sykon, fig.] i. A pustular folliculitis of the beard. 2. Hahnemann's term for the constitutional effects of the gonorrhea! virus. lu'poid s., a papular or pustular inflammation of the hair-follicles of the beard, followed by punctuate scarring and loss of the hair; ulerythema sycosiforme. non-parasit'ic 8., s. vulgaris. s. contagio'sa, tinea* sycosis, s. frambcesifor'mis,s. nuctue necrotisans. s. nu'chae necroti'sans, a pustular folliculitis, occurring at the scalp line at the back of the neck, resulting in permanent scarring, s. stapbylog'enes, s. vulgaris. 8. vulga'ris, nonparasitic s., due to simple infection with pus cocci, tin'ca s., parasitic s., ringworm of the beard, see under tinea.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sycosis (si-ko'sis) [Gr. onaon.aintnv fig]. I. A disease marked by inflammation of the hair-follicles, especially of the beard, forming papules or pustules that are perforated by the hairs and are surrounded by infiltrated skin. The disease results from general debility and constitutional disturbances. 2. A kind of ulcer on the eyelids, bacillogenic 8., sycosis said to be caused by the BacU'lus sycosif'erus Jctt'idus. 8. biT'bBB, sycosis of the beard, coccogenic 8., sycosis of the hairfollicles of the beard from infection of the follicle] by staphylococci. Called also non-parasitic s., i. barber, and *. rvlgare. 8. contagio'M, barbcri' itch, a contagious inflammatory disease of the hiiry parts of the face, caused by the presence ol Tn
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sycosis (si-ko'sis) [G. a fungous fig-like tumor; sykon, fig.] i. A pustular folliculitis of the beard. 2. Hahnemann's term for the constitutional effects of the gonorrhea! virus. lu'poid s., a papular or pustular inflammation of the hair-follicles of the beard, followed by punctuate scarring and loss of the hair; ulerythema sycosiforme. non-parasit'ic 8., s. vulgaris. s. contagio'sa, tinea* sycosis, s. frambcesifor'mis,s. nuctue necrotisans. s. nu'chae necroti'sans, a pustular folliculitis, occurring at the scalp line at the back of the neck, resulting in permanent scarring, s. stapbylog'enes, s. vulgaris. 8. vulga'ris, nonparasitic s., due to simple infection with pus cocci, tin'ca s., parasitic s., ringworm of the beard, see under tinea.
  501. sylvian - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sylvian (sil've-an). Described by or named for Francois de la Boe Sylvius, a French anatomist, 1614-1672. The name has been erroneously ascribed to Jacobus Sylvius (Jacques Dubois), a French anatomist, 1478-1555, the teacher of Vesalius. 8. aqueduct, artery, fissure, etc. See aqueduct, artery, fissure, etc.
  502. symbion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sym'bion [G. syn, with, + bios, life, mode of living.] An organism associated with another in symbiosis; commensal.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sym'bion [G. syn, with, + bios, life, mode of living.] An organism associated with another in symbiosis; commensal.
  503. symblepharon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      symblepharon (sim-blef-ar-on) [together; 0Xi4apo*, the eyelid]. Adhesion of the eyelids to the eyeball. B., anterior, when the edge of the lid is adherent. B.» posterior, when the adhesion is at the < onjiinrtiv.il fold, s., total, when the entire lid is adherent.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      symbleph'aron [G. syn, together, + blepharon, eyelid.] Adhesion of one or both lids to the eyeball, ante'xior s., union between the lid and eyeball by a fibrous band not involving the fornix. complete' B., adhesion involving the entire surface between the lid and eyeball, par'tial B., anterior or posterior s., incomplete s. poste'rior a., adhesion between the eyeball and lid involving the fornix. total s., complete s.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      symblepharon (sim-blef'ar-on) [Gr. abv together + i (Ai v"" eyelid]. Adhesion of the lids to the eyeball, anterior 8., adherence of the edge of the eyelid, posterior s., adhesion at the fold of the conjunctiva, total 8., adhesion of the entire lid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      symbleph'aron [G. syn, together, + blepharon, eyelid.] Adhesion of one or both lids to the eyeball, ante'xior s., union between the lid and eyeball by a fibrous band not involving the fornix. complete' B., adhesion involving the entire surface between the lid and eyeball, par'tial B., anterior or posterior s., incomplete s. poste'rior a., adhesion between the eyeball and lid involving the fornix. total s., complete s.
  504. symbolia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      symbo'lia [G. symbolon, a mark or sign.] The power of recognizing the form and nature of an object by touch.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      symbolia (sim-bo'le-ah). Ability to recognize the nature of objects by the sense of touch.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      symbo'lia [G. symbolon, a mark or sign.] The power of recognizing the form and nature of an object by touch.
  505. symbolophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      symbolopho'bia [G. symbolon, mark or sign + phobos, fear.] A morbid fear of having a symbolical meaning attached to one's acts or words.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      symbolophobia (sim"bol-o-fo'be-ah) [Gr. ?6/tfioXof symbol + fear]. A morbid fear that one's acts may contain some symbolic meaning.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      symbolopho'bia [G. symbolon, mark or sign + phobos, fear.] A morbid fear of having a symbolical meaning attached to one's acts or words.
  506. symmelia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      symmelia (sim-me'Te-ah). A condition In which the lower extremities are completely or almost completely united. [Gr., syn, with, + melos, a limb.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      symmelia (sim-e'le-ah) [Gr. adv together + /i*Xoj limb]. Fusion of the feet and legs.
  507. sympatheticotonia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sympatheticotonia (sim-pa-thet"l-ko-to'nl-ah). Sympathicotonia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sympatheticotonia (sim-path-et"ik-o-to'ne-ah). Sympathicotonia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sympatheticotonia (sim-pa-thet"l-ko-to'nl-ah). Sympathicotonia.
  508. sympathic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sympath'ic. Sympathetic.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sympathic (sim-path'ik). Sympathetic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sympath'ic. Sympathetic.
  509. sympathicotropic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sympathicotropic (sim-path"I-ko-trop'ik) [G. tropikos from trope, a turning.] Having a special affinity for the sympathetic nerve.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      sympathicotropic (sim-path"ik-o-trop'ik) [sympathetic + Gr. Tpoxutk turning]. Having an affinity for the sympathetic nervous system.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sympathicotropic (sim-path"I-ko-trop'ik) [G. tropikos from trope, a turning.] Having a special affinity for the sympathetic nerve.
  510. sympathist - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sympathist (sim'-poth-isf). One who is susceptible to hypnotic suggestion.
  511. sympodium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      sympodium (sim-pof-de-um) [syn-; rovt, foot: pl.t sympodia]. In biology, a stem which consists of a series of secondary stems or axes which have arisen as branches one from another, as in the grape-vine, the tomato, the linden, etc. See pseudaxis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      sympo'dium [G. syn, together, + pous(pod), foot.] In botany, a false axis, an apparently continuous stem made up of successive branches from preceding stems which are deflected from the axis at the point of branching.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      sympo'dium [G. syn, together, + pous(pod), foot.] In botany, a false axis, an apparently continuous stem made up of successive branches from preceding stems which are deflected from the axis at the point of branching.
  512. synarthrodia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      synarthrodia (sin-ar-thro'-de-ah). See synarthrosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      synarthro'dia. Synarthrosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synarthrodia (sin-ar-thro'de-ah) [Gr. aim together + apflpaoia joint]. An immovable joint whose adjacent surfaces are connected by no intervening tissue, and comprising synchondrosis, synostosis, and syndesmosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      synarthro'dia. Synarthrosis.
  513. synarthrodial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      synarthrodial (sin-ar-throf-de-af) [synarthrosis]. Pertaining to or of the nature of a synar thro sis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      synarthro'dial. Relating to synarthrosis; noting an immovable articulation between two bones.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synarthrodial (sin-ar-thro'de-al). Pertaining to synarthrodia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      synarthro'dial. Relating to synarthrosis; noting an immovable articulation between two bones.
  514. synarthrosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      synarthrosis (si n-ar-t hro'-sis) [syn-; &p0por, a joint]. A form of articulation in which the bones are immovably bound together without any intervening synovial cavity. The forms are suiura, in which processes are interlocked; schindylesis, in which a thin plate of one bone is inserted into a deft of another and gomphosis, in which a conical process is held by a socket.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      synarthrosis (sin-ar-thro'sis). That order of articulation (arthrosis) which includes the immovable joints. Its varieties are suture, harmony, and gomphosis. diarthrodinl s. See amphiarthrosis. [Gr., syn, with, -f arthron, a joint.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synarthrosis (sin-ar-thrp'sis) [Gr. abv togetJier + &p9pugomphosis, sckindyksis, and svlura.
  515. syndactyl - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      syndactyl (sin-dak'-til) [syn-; JAxruXot, a digit]. Having the fingers or toes joined together.
  516. syndectomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      syndectomy (sin-dek'-to-me). See pcritomy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syndec'tomy [G. syndesmos, a conjunction (conjunctiva), -f ektomS, excision.] Peritomy, excision of a ring of conjunctiva around the periphery of the cornea.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syndec'tomy [G. syndesmos, a conjunction (conjunctiva), -f ektomS, excision.] Peritomy, excision of a ring of conjunctiva around the periphery of the cornea.
  517. synezesis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synezesis (sin-ez-e'sis) [Gr. u-wlfiprif]. Contraction of the pupil of the eye.
  518. syngenesis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      syngenesis (sin-jen'-es-is) [syn-; ybtau, generationl. i. The theory that the embryo is the product of the union of the male and female elements; also the theory that the embryo contains within itself the germs of all future generations developed from it. 2. Reproduction by union of male and female elements.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syngen'esis [G. syn, together, 4- genesis, production.] i. Sexual reproduction. 2. The doctrine that in each sexual cell are contained the germs of all future generations of cells that may be derived from it.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      syngenesis (sin-jen'es-is) [Gr. aiiv together + •yfa»effis origin]. The hypothetic principle that each germ contains in itself the germs of every generation that may be derived from it.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syngen'esis [G. syn, together, 4- genesis, production.] i. Sexual reproduction. 2. The doctrine that in each sexual cell are contained the germs of all future generations of cells that may be derived from it.
  519. syngenetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      syngenetic (sin-jtn-et'-ik) (see syngenesis]. Propagated by means of both parents.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syngenet'ic. Relating to syngenesis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      syngenetic (sin-jen-et'ik). Pertaining to syngenesis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syngenet'ic. Relating to syngenesis.
  520. synkaryon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      synkaryon (sin-kar'-r-'in), A nucleus resulting from the fusion of two pronuclel.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      synkar'yon. Syncaryon.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synkaryon (sin-kar'e-on) [Gr.aiiv together + nipvon nucleus]. The nucleus produced by the fusion of two pronuclei; the fertilization nucleus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      synkar'yon. Syncaryon.
  521. synkinesis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      synkine'sis. Syncinesis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synkinesis (sin-kin-c'sis) [Gr. aiiv with -f- *l<Tjffu movement]. An unintentional movement accompanying a volitional movement; any involuntary or reflex movement in a paralyzed part, excited by a corresponding movement in a non-paralyzed part.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      synkine'sis. Syncinesis.
  522. synneurosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      synneurosis (sin-nH-ro'-sis). See syndesmosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synneurosis (sin-nu-ro'sis) [Gr. ,i!n> with + vtvpov nerve]. The union of bodies in a ligament.
  523. synocha - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      synocha (sin'o-kah) [G. synochos, lasting.] Febris synocha, a continued fever.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      synocha (sin'o-kah) [G. synochos, lasting.] Febris synocha, a continued fever.
  524. synochal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      synochal (sin'-o-kal) ... continued]. Pertaining to synocha. H
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      synochal (sin'o-kal). Noting a continued fever.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synochal (sin'o-kal). Of or pertaining to synocha.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      synochal (sin'o-kal). Noting a continued fever.
  525. synochus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      synochus (sin'o-kus) [G. synochos, lasting.] A continued fever.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      synochus (sin'o-kus) [G. synochos, lasting.] A continued fever.
  526. synopsy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synopsy (sin'op-se) [Gr. aim together + tyis vision]. The abnormal suggestion of types of the human face or figure by the various numerals.
  527. synorchism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synorchism (sin'or-kizm) [Gr. aiiv together t- 6pxa testicle]. Union or fusion of the testes.
  528. synosteosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      synosteosis (sin-os-te-oe-sis). See synostosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      synosteo'sis [G. syn, together, + osteon, bone.] i. Synostosis, bony ankylosis. a. Synarthrosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      synosteo'sis [G. syn, together, + osteon, bone.] i. Synostosis, bony ankylosis. a. Synarthrosis.
  529. synovin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      synovin (sin'-o-vin) [syn-; v6*% egg). -The form of ni in in found in synovia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syno'vin. One of two mucinous substances present in synovia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synovin (sin'o^vin). The mucin found in synovia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syno'vin. One of two mucinous substances present in synovia.
  530. synoviparous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      synoviparous (sin-o-vip'-ar-us) [synovia; parere. to produce]. Producing or secreting synovia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      synoviparous (si-no-vip'a-rus) [synovia + L. far ere, to produce.] Producing synovia; synovial.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synoviparous (sin-o-vip'ar-us) [synovia + L. par'ere to produce]. Producing synovia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      synoviparous (si-no-vip'a-rus) [synovia + L. far ere, to produce.] Producing synovia; synovial.
  531. syntexis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      syntexis (sin-teki'-is) [wrr^KCir, to melt together]. A wasting; tabes; phthisis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syntex'is [G. syntexis, a melting together.] Emaciation, wasting, phthisis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      syntexis (sin-teks'is) [Gr.]. Wasting or emaciation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syntex'is [G. syntexis, a melting together.] Emaciation, wasting, phthisis.
  532. synthermal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      synthermal (sin-ther'-maf). Same as isothermal.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      synthermal (sin-thur'mal) [G. syn, together, + therme, heat.] Having the same temperature.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synthermal (sin-ther'mal) [Gr. aiiv together + ti'i'i'i heat]. Having the same temperature.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      synthermal (sin-thur'mal) [G. syn, together, + therme, heat.] Having the same temperature.
  533. synthetism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      synthetism (sin'-thet-ixm) [synthesis]. The sum of operations and means necessary for reducing a fracture and holding the parts in position.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synthetism (sin'thet-izm) [Gr. put together]. The complete treatment of a fracture.
  534. synthol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      synthol (sin'-thol). A chemically pure synthetic substitute for alcohol. It is colorless and nonIrritant.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synthol (sin'thol). A synthetic preparation proposed as a substitute for absolute alcohol.
  535. syntonin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syn'tonin [G. syntonos, strained tight.] Acidalbumin.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      syntonin (sin'to-nin). A proteid obtained from muscular tissue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      syntonin (sin'to-nin). A protein obtained by the action of acids on myosin. It is apparently an acid-albumin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syn'tonin [G. syntonos, strained tight.] Acidalbumin.
  536. syntoxoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syntoxoid (sin-toks'oyd) [G. syn, with.] A toxoid having the same degree of affinity for an antitoxin that the toxin has.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syntoxoid (sin-toks'oyd) [G. syn, with.] A toxoid having the same degree of affinity for an antitoxin that the toxin has.
  537. syntropic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      syntropic (sin-trop'-ik) [syn-; rptrttv. to turn). Similar, and turned in the same direction (thus the ribs of either side are syntropic; those of opposite sides are antitropic).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syntrop'ic [G. syn, together, + Iropikos, turning.] In anatomy, noting a number of similar structures inclined in one general direction, as the spinous processes of a series of vertebrae, or tie ribs.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      syntropic (sin-trop'ik) [Gr. n!v together -I rpirtiv to turn]. Turning or pointing in the same direction, as the ribs or the vertebral spines.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syntrop'ic [G. syn, together, + Iropikos, turning.] In anatomy, noting a number of similar structures inclined in one general direction, as the spinous processes of a series of vertebrae, or tie ribs.
  538. synulotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      synulotic (sin-u-lot'-ik) [owvXorwij, healing]. Promoting cicatrization.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      synulotic (sin-u-lot'ik) [Gr. niv with + m'Aij scar]. I. Favoring cicatrization. 2. An agent that favors cicatrization.
  539. syphiloid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      syphiloid (st/'-i7-oid) [syphilis; tlSot like]. I. Resembling syphilis. 2. A disease resembling syphilis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syphiloid (sif'il-oyd) [G. eidos, resemblance.] Resembling syphilis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      syphiloid (sif'il-oid). i. Resembling syphilis. 2. Any disease resembling syphilis occurring as an epidemic at various times in certain countries.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syphiloid (sif'il-oyd) [G. eidos, resemblance.] Resembling syphilis.
  540. syphilology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      syphilology (sif-il-ol'-o-je) [syphilis; X6>«. science]. The sum ofknow'edge regarding the origin, nature, and treatment of syphilis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syphilol'ogy [syphilis + -ology.] The branch of medical science which has to do with syphilis in all its relations.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      syphilology (sif-il-ol'o-je) [syphilis + Gr. X&yos treatise). The sum of what is known regarding syphilis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syphilol'ogy [syphilis + -ology.] The branch of medical science which has to do with syphilis in all its relations.
  541. syphiloma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      syphiloma (sif-H-o'-mah) [syphilis; 6fta, tumor], i. A syphilitic gumma. 2. A term introduced by Kmst Wagner as a substitute for gumma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syphilo'ma. A syphilitic tumor, gumma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      syphiloma (sif-il-o'mah), pi. sypkilo'maia. A tumor of syphilitic origin; a gumma.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syphilo'ma. A syphilitic tumor, gumma.
  542. syphilomania - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      syphilomania (sif-il-o-ma'-ne-ah) [syphilis; mania].
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syphiloma'nia. Syphilophobia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      syphilomania (sif 'il-o-ma'ne-ah) [syphilis + Gi. fiaviu madness]. Same as syphilophobia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syphiloma'nia. Syphilophobia.
  543. syphilosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      syphilosis aif-il-o'-sis} [syphilis]. Syphilitic disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syphilosis (sif-I-lo'sis) [syphilis + -osis.] A more or less generalized syphilitic disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      syphilosis (sif-il-o'sis). Generalized syphilitic disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syphilosis (sif-I-lo'sis) [syphilis + -osis.] A more or less generalized syphilitic disease.
  544. syringin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      syringin (sir-in'-jin) [Syringa}. A crystalline glucoside obtained from Syringa vulgaris, CiTHaiO* +HaO, white, tasteless, acicular crystals, soluble in alcohol and hot water, boils at 191° C. It is antipyretic and antiperiodic; used in malaria. Syn., lilccin; ligustrin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syr'ingin. A crystalline tasteless glucoside, C17H21O,, in the bark and leaves of Ligustrum vulgare, or privet, and Syringa vulgaris, or lilac; employed as a tonic and antiperiodic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syr'ingin. A crystalline tasteless glucoside, C17H21O,, in the bark and leaves of Ligustrum vulgare, or privet, and Syringa vulgaris, or lilac; employed as a tonic and antiperiodic.
  545. syringobulbia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      syringobulbia (si-rin-go-bul'-be-ah) [oiipi~,£, tube; bulb]. The presence of cavities in the medulla oblongata similar to syring^omyelia.
  546. syssarcosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      syssarcosis (sis-ar-ko'-sis) (, together; <rAp£, flesh]. The union of bone by the interposition of muscular tissue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      syssarcosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      syssarcosis (sis-sar-ko'sis) [Gr. abv together + • r,i|/....',i,-. fleshy growth]. The union or connection of bones by means of muscle. An example is the connection between the hyoid bone and the lower jaw, the scapula, and the breast-bone.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      syssarcosis.
  547. systaltic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      systaltic (sis-tal'-iik) [systole]. Pulsatory; contracting; having a systole.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      systal'tic [G. systaltikos, contractile.] Pulsating:, alternately contracting and dilating; noting the action of the heart.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      systaltic (sis-tal'tik) [Gr. drawing together]. Alternately contracting and expanding.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      systal'tic [G. systaltikos, contractile.] Pulsating:, alternately contracting and dilating; noting the action of the heart.
  548. systema - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      systema (sis-U'-mah). See system.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      systema (sis-te'mah) [L.I. System.