User:Visviva/Two Gentlemen of Verona

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22177 tokens ‧ 14932 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 2633 types ‧ 43 (~ 1.633%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-01-25[edit]

  1. agood
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[1], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[2]:
      And at that time I made her weep agood; For I did play a lamentable part.
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  2. allycholly
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[3], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[4]:
      Now, my young guest, methinks you're allycholly; I pray you, why is it?
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  3. befortune
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[5], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[6]:
      Madam, I pity much your grievances; Which since I know they virtuously are plac'd, I give consent to go along with you, Recking as little what betideth me As much I wish all good befortune you.
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  4. braggardism
  5. catelog
  6. clerkly
  7. conceitless
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[13], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[14]:
      Think'st thou I am so shallow, so conceitless, To be seduced by thy flattery, That hast deceiv'd so many with thy vows?
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  8. corded
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare], Two Gentlemen of Verona[15], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[16]:
      This night he meaneth with a corded ladder To climb celestial Silvia's chamber window, Myself in counsel, his competitor.
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  9. disfurnish
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[17], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[18]:
      Then know that I have little wealth to lose; A man I am cross'd with adversity; My riches are these poor habiliments, Of which if you should here disfurnish me, You take the sum and substance that I have.
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  10. endamage
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[19], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[20]:
      Where your good word cannot advantage him, Your slander never can endamage him; Therefore the office is indifferent, Being entreated to it by your friend.
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  11. farthingale
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[21], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[22]:
      When didst thou see me heave up my leg and make water against a gentlewoman's farthingale?
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  12. fawneth
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[23], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[24]:
      When I protest true loyalty to her, She twits me with my falsehood to my friend; When to her beauty I commend my vows, She bids me think how I have been forsworn In breaking faith with Julia whom I lov'd; And notwithstanding all her sudden quips, The least whereof would quell a lover's hope, Yet, spaniel-like, the more she spurns my love The more it grows and fawneth on her still.
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  13. followest
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[25], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[26]:
      The sheep for fodder follow the shepherd; the shepherd for food follows not the sheep: thou for wages followest thy master; thy master for wages follows not thee.
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  14. gainst
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[27], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[28]:
      She is fair; and so is Julia that I love,-- That I did love, for now my love is thaw'd; Which like a waxen image 'gainst a fire Bears no impression of the thing it was.
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  15. halloing
  16. heardest
  17. importunacy
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[33], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[34]:
      Say that she be; yet Valentine, thy friend, Survives, to whom, thyself art witness, I am betroth'd; and art thou not asham'd To wrong him with thy importunacy?
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  18. jolthead
  19. mistresss
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[37], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[38]:
      This is the gentleman I told your ladyship Had come along with me but that his mistresss Did hold his eyes lock'd in her crystal looks.
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  20. muttons
  21. overtaketh
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[41], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[42]:
      The current that with gentle murmur glides, Thou know'st, being stopp'd, impatiently doth rage; But when his fair course is not hindered, He makes sweet music with th' enamell'd stones, Giving a gentle kiss to every sedge He overtaketh in his pilgrimage; And so by many winding nooks he strays, With willing sport, to the wild ocean.
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  22. passioning
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[43], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[44]:
      Madam, 'twas Ariadne passioning For Theseus' perjury and unjust flight; Which I so lively acted with my tears That my poor mistress, mov'd therewithal, Wept bitterly; and would I might be dead If I in thought felt not her very sorrow!
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  23. persevers
  24. profferer
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[47], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[48]:
      Since maids, in modesty, say 'No' to that Which they would have the profferer construe 'Ay.'
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  25. reportest
  26. resembleth
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[51], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[52]:
      O! how this spring of love resembleth The uncertain glory of an April day, Which now shows all the beauty of the sun, And by an by a cloud takes all away!
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  27. soho
  28. sourt
  29. swinged
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[57], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[58]:
      I thank you, you swinged me for my love, which makes me the bolder to chide you for yours.
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  30. tenour
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[59], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[60]:
      The tenour of them doth but signify My health and happy being at your court.
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  31. testerned
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[61], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[62]:
      To testify your bounty, I thank you, you have testerned me; in requital whereof, henceforth carry your letters yourself; and so, sir, I'll commend you to my master.
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  32. throughly
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[63], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[64]:
      And here is writ 'love-wounded Proteus': Poor wounded name! my bosom, as a bed, Shall lodge thee till thy wound be throughly heal'd; And thus I search it with a sovereign kiss.
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  33. twas
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[65], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[66]:
      You do him the more wrong,' quoth I; "twas I did the thing you wot of.'
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  34. ungartered
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[67], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[68]:
      O! that you had mine eyes; or your own eyes had the lights they were wont to have when you chid at Sir Proteus for going ungartered!
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  35. unheedfully
  36. unmellowed
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[71], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[72]:
      I knew him as myself; for from our infancy We have convers'd and spent our hours together; And though myself have been an idle truant, Omitting the sweet benefit of time To clothe mine age with angel-like perfection, Yet hath Sir Proteus,--for that's his name,-- Made use and fair advantage of his days: His years but young, but his experience old; His head unmellowed, but his judgment ripe; And, in a word,--for far behind his worth Comes all the praises that I now bestow,-- He is complete in feature and in mind, With all good grace to grace a gentleman.
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  37. unprevented
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[73], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[74]:
      Thus, for my duty's sake, I rather chose To cross my friend in his intended drift Than, by concealing it, heap on your head A pack of sorrows which would press you down, Being unprevented, to your timeless grave.
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  38. unreverend
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[75], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[76]:
      Fie, fie, unreverend tongue, to call her bad, Whose sovereignty so oft thou hast preferr'd With twenty thousand soul-confirming oaths.
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  39. unsounded
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[77], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[78]:
      Write till your ink be dry, and with your tears Moist it again, and frame some feeling line That may discover such integrity: For Orpheus' lute was strung with poets' sinews, Whose golden touch could soften steel and stones, Make tigers tame, and huge leviathans Forsake unsounded deeps to dance on sands.
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  40. unstaid
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[79], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[80]:
      But tell me, wench, how will the world repute me For undertaking so unstaid a journey?
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  41. untuneable
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[81], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[82]:
      Then in dumb silence will I bury mine, For they are harsh, untuneable, and bad.
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  42. wailful
    • a. 1598, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona[83], edition 1914 Oxford ed.[84]:
      But you, Sir Thurio, are not sharp enough; You must lay lime to tangle her desires By wailful sonnets, whose composed rhymes Should be full-fraught with serviceable vows.
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Sequestered[edit]