Template:RQ:Austen Pride and Prejudice

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1813 January 27, [Jane Austen], Pride and Prejudice: A Novel. In Three Volumes, volume (please specify |volume=I, II or III), London: Printed [by George Sidney] for T[homas] Egerton, Military Library, Whitehall, OCLC 38659585:

Usage[edit]

This template may be used on Wiktionary entry pages to quote Jane Austen's book Pride and Prejudice: A Novel (1st ed., 1813, 3 volumes). It creates links to online versions of the work at the Internet Archive:

Parameters[edit]

The template takes the following parameters:

  • |1= or |volume=mandatory: the volume number quoted from, in uppercase Roman numerals, either |volume=I, |volume=II, or |volume=III.
  • |2= or |chapter= – the chapter number quoted from, in uppercase Roman numerals. The chapter numbers begin from I in each volume.
  • |3= or |page=, or |pages=mandatory in some cases: the page number(s) quoted from. When quoting a range of pages, note the following:
    • Separate the first and last pages of the range with an en dash, like this: |pages=110–111.
    • You must also use |pageref= to specify the page number that the template should link to (usually the page on which the Wiktionary entry appears).
If this parameter is omitted, the template will not link to the online version of the work.
  • |4= or |passage= – a passage quoted from the book.
  • |brackets= – Use |brackets=on to surround a quotation with brackets. This indicates that the quotation either contains a mere mention of a term (for example, "some people find the word manoeuvre hard to spell") rather than an actual use of it (for example, "we need to manoeuvre carefully to avoid causing upset"), or does not provide an actual instance of a term but provides information about related terms.

Examples[edit]

  • Wikitext:
    • {{RQ:Austen Pride and Prejudice|volume=I|chapter=XIX|page=251|passage=When I do myself the honour of speaking to you next on the subject, I shall hope to receive a more favourable answer than you have now given me; though I am far from accusing you of cruelty at present, because I know it to be the established custom of your sex to reject a man on the first application, and perhaps you have even now said as much to encourage my suit as would be '''consistent''' with the true delicacy of the female character.}}; or
    • {{RQ:Austen Pride and Prejudice|I|XIX|251|When I do myself the honour of speaking to you next on the subject, I shall hope to receive a more favourable answer than you have now given me; though I am far from accusing you of cruelty at present, because I know it to be the established custom of your sex to reject a man on the first application, and perhaps you have even now said as much to encourage my suit as would be '''consistent''' with the true delicacy of the female character.}}
  • Result:
    • 1813 January 27, [Jane Austen], chapter XIX, in Pride and Prejudice: A Novel. In Three Volumes, volume I, London: Printed [by George Sidney] for T[homas] Egerton, Military Library, Whitehall, OCLC 38659585, page 251:
      When I do myself the honour of speaking to you next on the subject, I shall hope to receive a more favourable answer than you have now given me; though I am far from accusing you of cruelty at present, because I know it to be the established custom of your sex to reject a man on the first application, and perhaps you have even now said as much to encourage my suit as would be consistent with the true delicacy of the female character.
  • Wikitext: {{RQ:Austen Pride and Prejudice|volume=III|chapter=II|pages=37–38|pageref=38|passage=Miss Darcy was tall, and on a larger scale than Elizabeth; and, though little more than sixteen, her figure was formed, and her appearance womanly and graceful. She was less handsome than her brother; but there was sense and good humour in her face, and her manners were perfectly unassuming and gentle. Elizabeth, who had expected to find in her as acute and unembarrassed an observer as ever Mr. Darcy had been, was much relieved by discerning such different feelings.}}
  • Result:
    • 1813 January 27, [Jane Austen], chapter II, in Pride and Prejudice: A Novel. In Three Volumes, volume III, London: Printed [by George Sidney] for T[homas] Egerton, Military Library, Whitehall, OCLC 38659585, pages 37–38:
      Miss Darcy was tall, and on a larger scale than Elizabeth; and, though little more than sixteen, her figure was formed, and her appearance womanly and graceful. She was less handsome than her brother; but there was sense and good humour in her face, and her manners were perfectly unassuming and gentle. Elizabeth, who had expected to find in her as acute and unembarrassed an observer as ever Mr. Darcy had been, was much relieved by discerning such different feelings.