Appendix:Japanese tea ceremony terms

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This is an alphabetical list of terms used in Japanese tea ceremony. Note that in tea ceremony terms are often prefixed with the Japanese honorifics "o-" or "go"; terms are listed here under the first letter of the word (eg: kama), followed by the honorific, if applicable (o-kama).

C[edit]

Cha, o-cha
Tea; tea ceremony; the study of tea.
Cha-ire, o-cha-ire
A general term for containers, usually ceramic, made for holding thick tea. See Chaki.
Chajin
A person who studies tea; a tea master.
Chaki
Tea caddy; container for holding powdered green tea. See also: Cha-ire, Natsume.
Chakin
A white hemp or linen cloth used for handling hot lids and for the ritual cleaning of tea implements during tea ceremonies.
Chakin tarai
A bowl, usually made from copper, used for rinsing and washing chakin. It is kept on the bamboo sink-covering in the mizuya.
Chamei, o-chamei
The name of a batch of tea; a tea name. A tea name is a name given to advanced practitioners of tea ceremony, by which they are known in the tea world. Tea names are usually chosen by the iemoto and are bestowed during a formal ceremony. The name of every member of a given school will usually have at least one Chinese character in common.
Charcoal
See Sumi.
Chasen
A whisk hand carved from bamboo, used to blend powdered tea and water.
Chasen kusenaoshi
A whisk shaper, used to restore or maintain the shape of chasen.
Chashaku, o-chashaku
A tea scoop carved from bamboo.
Chashitsu
Tea house, tea room.
Chawan, o-chawan
A bowl for drinking tea.

D[edit]

Dōgu
equipment for tea ceremony

F[edit]

Fuku, puku
The counter for bowls of tea. See also: Fukukagen.
Fukukagen, o-fukukagen
A bowl of tea; a serving of tea.
Fukusa
A square, silk cloth used for ritual cleaning of tea equipment and for handling hot lids. See also: Kobukusa.

I[edit]

Iemoto, o-iemoto
The head of a tea school; the founder of a tea school.

K[edit]

Kama, o-kama
An iron pot used for heating water during tea ceremonies.
Kensui
A waste-water container used by the host in the tea room during ceremonies. Water that has been used to rinse the tea bowl is emptied into the bowl, and in the event that the host must dispose of a small item (such as a used sheet of kaishi), he or she will place it in the kensui. Since it is considered dirty, kensui is kept out of sight of the guests as much as possible. It is the last item brought into the tea room, and the first item removed.
Kobukusa
A small fukusa used for handling tea implements.

M[edit]

Matcha
Powdered green tea.
Mizusashi
A fresh water container used by the host in the tea room during ceremonies. The water it holds, which is cool, is used to rinse implements during the ritual cleaning, as well as to replenish the water in the kama at the end of certain ceremonies.
Mizutsugi
A pot with a spout, resembling a large teapot. It holds fresh, cool water, and is used to replenish the water in the kama or tetsubin at the end of certain ceremonies. The mizusashi is not kept in the tea room, but rather is brought in as the final step of certain ceremonies for the purpose of replenishing the pot.
Mizuya
Preparation area. A separate room or a small area where the host gathers and prepares the equipment and supplies needed for a tea ceremony.
Mushanokōjisenke
One of the three main Schools of Japanese tea ceremony descended from Sen no Rikyu, and one of the so-called san senke. The other two are Urasenke and Omotesenke.

O[edit]

Omotesenke
One of the three main schools of tea ceremony descended from Sen no Rikyu, and one of the so-called san senke. The other two are Urasenke and Mushanokōjisenke.

R[edit]

Raku
The name of a kiln and a style of creating pottery and tea bowls used in tea ceremony.

S[edit]

Shifuku, o-shifuku
A bag, usually silk, made for holding tea utensils. Certain utensils are always placed in shifuku, such as cha-ire.
Sumi
Charcoal. Both ro and furo were traditionally heated with charcoal, but now electric versions are available. Charcoal is still preferred on formal occasions, however.

T[edit]

Tea caddy
See Cha-ire, Chaki, Koi-chaki, Natsume, Usu-chaki.
Temae
Tea ceremony procedure.
Tetsubin
An iron teapot-shaped pot used for heating water (but not brewing tea) during tea ceremonies.
Tokonoma
The scroll alcove in a tea room, where scrolls are hung and other decorations are placed.

U[edit]

Urasenke
One of the three main schools of tea ceremony descended from Sen no Rikyu, and one of the so-called san senke. The other two are Mushanokōjisenke and Omotesenke.