Bilboesque

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Bilbo +‎ -esque.

Adjective[edit]

Bilboesque (comparative more Bilboesque, superlative most Bilboesque)

  1. (rare) Reminiscent of Theodore G. Bilbo’s racist sentiment.
    • 1994, John Egerton, Speak Now Against The Day: The Generation Before the Civil Rights Movement in the South, Knopf (1994), ISBN 9780307834577, unnumbered page:
      Mississippi voters gave Bilboesque Senator James O. Eastland a resounding vote of confidence; []
    • 2008, Chris Myers Asch, The Senator and the Sharecropper: The Freedom Struggles of James O. Eastland and Fannie Lou Hamer, University of North Carolina Press (2011), ISBN 9780807872024, page 329 (endnote):
      [] writing in 1968, Robert Sherrill commented upon this apparent contradiction between Eastland's public image as a Bilboesque demagogue and his private geniality: []
    • 2011, Reuel Schiller, "Singing 'The Right-to-Work Blues': The Politics of Race in the Campaign for 'Voluntary Unionism' in Postwar California", in The Right and Labor in America: Politics, Ideology, and Imagination (eds. Nelson Lichtenstein & Elizabeth Tandy Shermer), University of Pennsylvania Press (2012), ISBN 9780812244144, page 156:
      It touches every possible nerve of a progressive Californian, whether black or white, by linking the right-to-work movement to the worst excesses of southern extremism: absurd, Bilboesque miscegenation fears; []
  2. Of, relating to, or reminiscent of the character Bilbo Baggins from The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings.
    • 1981, Katharyn W. Crabbe, J. R. R. Tolkien, Frederick Ungar Publishers (1981), ISBN 9780804421348, page 60:
      At the same time, Bilboesque proverbs like "Every worm has his weak spot" and "Never laugh at live dragons" use the familiar proverb form to make the unfamiliar inhabitants of the secondary world seem more matter-of-fact.
    • 2010, Toby Manhire, "The Hobbit hullabaloo", The Guardian, 29 October 2010:
      So here goes: much as Alex Ferguson and Manchester United could not afford to let their Bilboesque, talismanic striker leave the football club, Key and New Zealand could not afford to let this production take flight.
    • 2011, Geoff Boucher, "‘The Hobbit’: Peter Jackson and the one true Bilbo Baggins", Los Angeles Times, 23 August 2011:
      “He’s Bilbo-esque,” the filmmaker said. “You might not always want to say that about you, right? But seriously he has the essential features of this little English gent, this country gent who is slightly old-fashioned and has to go around in the world and try to cope with it. That’s not exactly who Martin [Freeman] is as a person, but as an actor he does that so well. []
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see the citations page.