Citations:vividities

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English citations of vividities

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

1823 1925 1928 1958 1977 2005
ME « 15th c. 16th c. 17th c. 18th c. 19th c. 20th c. 21st c.
  1. Plural form of vividity.
    • 1823: AUTHOR UNKNOWN, The Lady’s magazine (and museum). Improved ser., enlarged, p266
      …and the vividities of passion, the writer may not have known how to procure the morrow’s sustenance.
    • 1925: Joseph Conrad, The Complete Works of Joseph Conrad, p255 (Nota bene: this citation and every one of those marked with a superscribed obelus (†) are identical copies of Joseph Conrad’s unfinished last novel “Suspense” (published posthumously in 1925); the citation marked with a superscribed double obelus (‡) also quotes thence, but is not verbatim identical.)
      At every momentary pause in his long and fantastic adventure it returned with its splendid charm and glorious serenity, resembling the power of a great and unfathomable love whose tenderness like a sacred spell lays to rest all the vividities and all the violences of passionate desire.
    • 1928: Joseph Conrad, Suspense: A Napoleonic Novel, p255
      At every momentary pause in his long and fantastic adventure it returned with its splendid charm and glorious serenity, resembling the power of a great and unfathomable love whose tenderness like a sacred spell lays to rest all the vividities and all the violences of passionate desire.
    • 1958: Joseph Conrad, The Concord Edition of the Works of Joseph Conrad — Suspense: A Napoleonic Novel, p255
      At every momentary pause in his long and fantastic adventure it returned with its splendid charm and glorious serenity, resembling the power of a great and unfathomable love whose tenderness like a sacred spell lays to rest all the vividities and all the violences of passionate desire.
    • 1977: Angus Wilson & John Holloway, Writers of East Anglia, p120
      We are the echoes from the planets,
        the blackbody vividities,
        and the high-energy tailing
        that flows from the springs of time. [ …]
    • 1995: Joseph Conrad, The Collected Works of Joseph Conrad, p255
      At every momentary pause in his long and fantastic adventure it returned with its splendid charm and glorious serenity, resembling the power of a great and unfathomable love whose tenderness like a sacred spell lays to rest all the vividities and all the violences of passionate desire.
    • 2005: Carola M Kaplan, Peter Lancelot Mallios, and Andrea White (including NetLibrary), Conrad in the Twenty-first Century: Contemporary Approaches and Perspectives, p192
      Yet there is one important difference between his growing attachment to Adele and his sudden entanglement with Attilio’s band. His love only provoked a vision and consequently an unbearable degree of agitation that forced him to flee even his bedchamber at Cantelucci’s inn, whereas aboard the conspirators’ boat Cosmo luxuriates in a paradoxical “feeling of peace that had come to him directly his trouble had begun,” and that “like a sacred spell lays to rest all the vividities and … violences of passionate desire” (Su 244, 255).