Talk:all over

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all over#Adjective

rfd-sense: adjective "done, complete". usage example: "It's all over now".

This seems misleading to language learners. It implies idiomaticity and the need to memorize when other forms of "all over" are idiomatic and this is not. The situation is confusing enough without introducing this canard. "All over" is idiomatic at least as an adverb and probably as a preposition and all-over is an attributive adjective derived from the adverb.

"It's all over" can be read at least two ways:

  1. As the entry shows. But this is unsupported by any of the OneLook dictionaries that have an entry for "all over". Furthermore, "all over" does not meet the usual tests for being an adjective:
    1. It does not work as an attributive adjective,
    2. It does not form a comparative.
    3. It is not gradable.
  2. As "It is completely over" (all as intensifying adverb}. "All" can be omitted, just as completely can, with the expected reduction of intensity. "Over" behaves more like an adjective, accepting many adverbs that make it gradable (though not for many speakers "very" or "so"), like "almost", "completely", "about". This is in line with what other dictionaries show for the constituent words. DCDuring TALK 16:24, 29 October 2009 (UTC)
Delete per DCDuring. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:54, 29 October 2009 (UTC)
Delete. Equinox 19:24, 30 October 2009 (UTC)

Deleted. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:42, 13 November 2009 (UTC)

all over#Adverb

Rfd-sense: "again". Usage example: "He had to write the assignment all over." IMHO, "over" in the sense of "again", as used in: "There are so many mistakes in the entry, we may as well delete it and start over.", is being modified by the intensifier "all", as above. No OneLook dictionary has this sense of "all over".

If my analysis is correct, the entry illustrates a problem with too-easily accepted purportedly idiomatic entries: the entries fill slots, no redlinks exist, and missing senses don't get entered. The challenged sense was previously the sole sense of the adverb all over. MWOnline had three missing senses for this adverb. DCDuring TALK 17:00, 29 October 2009 (UTC)

Delete per DCDuring. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:54, 29 October 2009 (UTC)
Delete. Equinox 19:24, 30 October 2009 (UTC)

Deleted. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:42, 13 November 2009 (UTC)


Request for deletion[edit]

Keep tidy.svg

The following information has failed Wiktionary's deletion process.

It should not be re-entered without careful consideration.


all over#Adjective

rfd-sense: adjective "done, complete". usage example: "It's all over now".

This seems misleading to language learners. It implies idiomaticity and the need to memorize when other forms of "all over" are idiomatic and this is not. The situation is confusing enough without introducing this canard. "All over" is idiomatic at least as an adverb and probably as a preposition and all-over is an attributive adjective derived from the adverb.

"It's all over" can be read at least two ways:

  1. As the entry shows. But this is unsupported by any of the OneLook dictionaries that have an entry for "all over". Furthermore, "all over" does not meet the usual tests for being an adjective:
    1. It does not work as an attributive adjective,
    2. It does not form a comparative.
    3. It is not gradable.
  2. As "It is completely over" (all as intensifying adverb}. "All" can be omitted, just as completely can, with the expected reduction of intensity. "Over" behaves more like an adjective, accepting many adverbs that make it gradable (though not for many speakers "very" or "so"), like "almost", "completely", "about". This is in line with what other dictionaries show for the constituent words. DCDuring TALK 16:24, 29 October 2009 (UTC)
Delete per DCDuring. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:54, 29 October 2009 (UTC)
Delete. Equinox 19:24, 30 October 2009 (UTC)

Deleted. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:42, 13 November 2009 (UTC)

all over#Adverb

Rfd-sense: "again". Usage example: "He had to write the assignment all over." IMHO, "over" in the sense of "again", as used in: "There are so many mistakes in the entry, we may as well delete it and start over.", is being modified by the intensifier "all", as above. No OneLook dictionary has this sense of "all over".

If my analysis is correct, the entry illustrates a problem with too-easily accepted purportedly idiomatic entries: the entries fill slots, no redlinks exist, and missing senses don't get entered. The challenged sense was previously the sole sense of the adverb all over. MWOnline had three missing senses for this adverb. DCDuring TALK 17:00, 29 October 2009 (UTC)

Delete per DCDuring. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:54, 29 October 2009 (UTC)
Delete. Equinox 19:24, 30 October 2009 (UTC)

Deleted. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:42, 13 November 2009 (UTC)


Request for deletion[edit]

Keep tidy.svg

The following information has failed Wiktionary's deletion process.

It should not be re-entered without careful consideration.


all over#Adjective

rfd-sense: adjective "done, complete". usage example: "It's all over now".

This seems misleading to language learners. It implies idiomaticity and the need to memorize when other forms of "all over" are idiomatic and this is not. The situation is confusing enough without introducing this canard. "All over" is idiomatic at least as an adverb and probably as a preposition and all-over is an attributive adjective derived from the adverb.

"It's all over" can be read at least two ways:

  1. As the entry shows. But this is unsupported by any of the OneLook dictionaries that have an entry for "all over". Furthermore, "all over" does not meet the usual tests for being an adjective:
    1. It does not work as an attributive adjective,
    2. It does not form a comparative.
    3. It is not gradable.
  2. As "It is completely over" (all as intensifying adverb}. "All" can be omitted, just as completely can, with the expected reduction of intensity. "Over" behaves more like an adjective, accepting many adverbs that make it gradable (though not for many speakers "very" or "so"), like "almost", "completely", "about". This is in line with what other dictionaries show for the constituent words. DCDuring TALK 16:24, 29 October 2009 (UTC)
Delete per DCDuring. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:54, 29 October 2009 (UTC)
Delete. Equinox 19:24, 30 October 2009 (UTC)

Deleted. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:42, 13 November 2009 (UTC)

all over#Adverb

Rfd-sense: "again". Usage example: "He had to write the assignment all over." IMHO, "over" in the sense of "again", as used in: "There are so many mistakes in the entry, we may as well delete it and start over.", is being modified by the intensifier "all", as above. No OneLook dictionary has this sense of "all over".

If my analysis is correct, the entry illustrates a problem with too-easily accepted purportedly idiomatic entries: the entries fill slots, no redlinks exist, and missing senses don't get entered. The challenged sense was previously the sole sense of the adverb all over. MWOnline had three missing senses for this adverb. DCDuring TALK 17:00, 29 October 2009 (UTC)

Delete per DCDuring. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:54, 29 October 2009 (UTC)
Delete. Equinox 19:24, 30 October 2009 (UTC)

Deleted. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:42, 13 November 2009 (UTC)