Talk:roll

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Plagiarism?[edit]

Parts of these defintions appear to be from Merriam-Webster or other sources (e.g., google "A cylindrical twist of tobacco."), but it doesn't look like the whole article was lifted from elsewhere. Is this OK? -dmh 04:02, 7 Sep 2004 (UTC)

I think they are from the Webster 1913 edition, which is out of copyright. Equinox 19:18, 1 June 2013 (UTC)

Cameras[edit]

"The cameras are rolling." Does any existing sense cover this? It's not talking about the reels of film specifically; cameras themselves do not roll. It means something more like "working" or "active". Equinox 23:27, 13 March 2009 (UTC)

Now adding a crappy sense to cover this. Please improve. Equinox 19:15, 1 June 2013 (UTC)

RFV debate[edit]

Also posted at rolling. See this discussion. — Beobach 02:40, 19 November 2010 (UTC)

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rolling

Rfv-sense: Being under the influence of the psychedelic stimulant MDMA (aka "Ecstasy"). Note we don't have a verb sense for this at role. Mglovesfun (talk) 08:11, 4 April 2010 (UTC)

Cited, -ish: the cites I added are actually participial. "RollVERB on ecstasy" is attestable on Google Groups. (A corresponding noun "roll" is also attestable.) —RuakhTALK 14:34, 11 September 2010 (UTC)

Striking. I've merged our noun entry into roll#Verb, and deleted rollings. —RuakhTALK 17:10, 25 October 2010 (UTC)

rolling thunder?[edit]

In a BBC document I saw in the hearing-impaired subtitles the line "thunder rolls" when a dark cloud filled the horizon. I can't find a definition for this use as a verb, or am I missing something? --Hydrox 05:29, 13 February 2011 (UTC)