User talk:Angr

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RE: Galician cu[edit]

Sorry. You are right. I am more careful with copy and paste. Regards and thanks. --Vivaelcelta (talk) 11:07, 12 April 2014 (UTC)

It may be. But I am not sure, because I don't know phonetic. Regards --Vivaelcelta (talk) 11:14, 12 April 2014 (UTC)
Yes, but sometimes the words choose, like oso and óso. But in this case it must be well. --Vivaelcelta (talk) 11:20, 12 April 2014 (UTC)

Problem[edit]

In this Spanish entry hijo de puta, appears plural and feminine form. But in this Galician fillo de puta, entry doesn't appear the feminine form. Can you fix? Regards and thanks. --Vivaelcelta (talk) 12:32, 12 April 2014 (UTC)

No, I can't, sorry. The difference is that {{es-noun}} allows you to specify a feminine equivalent, but {{gl-noun}} doesn't. And I don't know how to fix that. But you can still add filla de puta manually to a ====Coordinate terms==== subsection on the fillo de puta page. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 12:36, 12 April 2014 (UTC)
I just added the f= parameter. It should be working now. — Ungoliant (falai) 12:43, 12 April 2014 (UTC)

autopase[edit]

How is into English the Spanish word autopase? It is a pass that gives and receives the same player ignoring the opposing to him obstructs. Regards. --Vivaelcelta (talk) 22:01, 16 April 2014 (UTC)

Sorry, I don't know anything at all about soccer. I did find Google hits for the word self-pass, but I don't know if that's the same thing as Spanish autopase. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 05:02, 18 April 2014 (UTC)

Spanish accentuation[edit]

Why is reloj accented on the last syllable? And why can the final j be not pronounced? Is there a rule? --kc_kennylau (talk) 15:02, 18 April 2014 (UTC)

Reloj is accented on the last syllable because the spelling rule in Spanish is that words ending in a consonant letter other than n and s are stressed on the last syllable (e.g. verdad, niñez). The j can be silent because in many varieties of Spanish, j is pronounced /h/ rather than /x/, and in a whole lot of languages (including English) /h/ never appears at the end of a word. And I guess even in the varieties of Spanish where j is pronounced /x/, there are so few words ending in /x/ (or indeed any non-coronal consonant) that it feels weird to Spanish speakers to say /reˈlox/, so they drop the /x/ and and say /reˈlo/. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 16:06, 18 April 2014 (UTC)
Any other consonants causing drop at word-final? --kc_kennylau (talk) 02:05, 19 April 2014 (UTC)
Not that I can think of off the top of my head. I'll let you know if anything occurs to me. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 10:12, 19 April 2014 (UTC)
Can you help me see why adminiculo lost its d? Other than that, please check the cases in Template:es-pronunc/documentation. --kc_kennylau (talk) 15:15, 19 April 2014 (UTC)
I don't know that word; adminiculo is a Latin word. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 15:20, 19 April 2014 (UTC)
I'd go easy on the diacritics in the narrow transcription. They make it harder to read and often suggest a greater level of precision than is either necessary or true. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 15:22, 19 April 2014 (UTC)
I mean the adminiculo in the testcases. --kc_kennylau (talk) 15:41, 19 April 2014 (UTC)
Sorry, I don't know why. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 15:45, 19 April 2014 (UTC)

Eye dialect[edit]

I've looked for some citations, and it seems you're right that the term eye dialect is used for nonstandard spellings of standard pronunciations. But in that case, it seems like we're misusing {{eye dialect of}} in some of our entries. For instance, ze, aboot, you welcome, and wonderfool. —Mr. Granger (talkcontribs) 14:31, 19 April 2014 (UTC)

Yes, we are misusing that. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 14:40, 19 April 2014 (UTC)

Edit request: Template:es-conj-ar[edit]

And is there any way that you could unprotect it? Thanks in advance --kc_kennylau (talk) 17:45, 19 April 2014 (UTC)

I've bumped the protection down to semiprotection, so you should be able to edit it now. I didn't make any changes to the template itself. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 17:50, 19 April 2014 (UTC)
Thanks. --kc_kennylau (talk) 18:01, 19 April 2014 (UTC)
Please lower the protection level in all the other templates. --kc_kennylau (talk) 07:33, 20 April 2014 (UTC)

γράφω[edit]

You noted that the verb had an incorrect perfect, which has since then been modified... is it now correct? ObsequiousNewt (ἔβαζα|ἐτλέλεσα) 18:19, 23 April 2014 (UTC)

Yes. As long as it uses {{grc-conj-perfect-labial}} rather than {{grc-conj-perfect}} everything's okay. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 18:24, 23 April 2014 (UTC)

*wlānā[edit]

As far as I know, the regular reflex of PIE *-R̥HR- sequences (two resonants) in Celtic is *-RāR-, while the reflex of *-R̥HC- (obstruent) is *-RaC-. Compare for example *pl̥Hmeh₂ (hand) > Celtic *ɸlāmā, which has almost the same structure. w:Proto-Celtic seems to corroborate this. —CodeCat 23:26, 23 April 2014 (UTC)

Yep, that's what's supposed to happen. But Brythonic unambiguously shows an original short -a-, since -ā- would have become aw in Welsh, as in *ɸlāmā > llaw(f). Meanwhile Goidelic actually can't come from either *wlānā (which would have given O.Ir. ×flán) or *wlanā (O.Ir. ×flan) but only from *ulanā or *ulānā with a syllabic u-. And the Welsh word at least (I don't know about Cornish and Breton) is masculine, not feminine, so it actually seems to come from *wlano-. Maybe *wlanā was reinterpreted as a collective/neuter plural and a new singular *wlanom was back-formed from it. Matasovic reconstructs both a feminine *ulanā and a neuter *wlāno-, though the vocalism of the latter seems to be based on what we expect *-l̥h₁n- to become rather than on actual Celtic evidence. He also reconstructs the PIE word without an initial laryngeal, saying the initial h in Hittite is due to metathesis and that "there is no other evidence for the word-initial laryngeal in PIE" (I guess because Greek is λῆνος (lēnos) and not ×ἀλῆνος). —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 23:41, 23 April 2014 (UTC)