Yggdrasil

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English[edit]

An illustration depicting Yggdrasil, by Oluf Olufsen Bagge, for 1847, Northern Antiquities, an English translation of the Prose Edda
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Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse Yggdrasill; commonly accepted as being composed yggr (terrible) + drasill (steed), where “steed” refers to a hanging tree.

Alternative forms[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Yggdrasil

  1. (Norse mythology) An immense ash tree that is central in Norse cosmology, believed to connect the nine worlds.
    • 1863, The London Quarterly Review, Volumes 113-114, page 117,
      Yet it is not easy to pluck out the heart of its mystery; and the descriptions of certain ancient representatives of Yggdrasil do not lessen the difficulty.
    • 1963, Spike Milligan, Puckoon, chapter 1, page 1,
      With nostrils and legs akimbo, she towered over him like some human Yggdrasill, blotting out the sun.
    • 1996, Carolyne Larrington (editor and translator), The Seeress's Prophecy, The Poetic Edda, page 6,
      I know that an ash-tree stands called Yggdrasill,
      a high tree, soaked with shining loam;
      from there come the dews which fall in the valley,
      ever green, it stands over the well of fate.
    • 2007, Bob Curran, Ian Daniels, Walking with the Green Man: Father of the Forest, Spirit of Nature, page 66,
      In Norse mythology, for example, the World Tree, or Yggdrasil, connected the nine existences that straddled the worlds of gods and men with its mighty roots. Yggdrasil was reputedly a gigantic ash tree (and was the central feature of Norse cosmology), around the base of which the serpent Níôhöggr had twisted its body.
    • 2007, J. A. Hunsinger, The Settlers: An Axe of Iron Novel, page 333,
      Yggdrasil!” Gudbjartur's voice was filled with awe. “It is Yggdrasil, the world-tree!” He looked at Halfdan, his eyes wide. “The Sacred Grove is here in this land!”

Translations[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Faroese Wikipedia has an article on:

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Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse Yggdrasill.

Proper noun[edit]

Yggdrasil

  1. (mythology) Yggdrasil