caritative

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From caritas.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkæɹ.ɪˌteɪ.tɪv/, /ˈkæɹ.ɪˌtə.tɪv/

Adjective[edit]

caritative

  1. charitable
    the caritative mission of the group
    • 2004, Phyllis G. Jestice, Holy People of the World: A Cross-Cultural Encyclopedia, ABC-CLIO (2004), ISBN 9781851096497, page 183:
      Since that time, both Catholicism and the Protestant denominations have seen an enormous outpouring of caritative agencies. Nuns and monks made teaching and care for the underprivileged a central part of their vocation; devout men and women have founded and devoted their lives to institutions as far removed as Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity and the Salvation Army.
    • 2008, Arthur J. Gemmell, Western and Chinese Arbitration: The Arbitral Chain, University Press of America (2008), ISBN 9780761840060, page 63:
      Initially guilds were founded founded for benevolent and caritative reasons; however, in time guilds developed into a major economic force within the towns in which they operated.
    • 2009, James William Brodman, Charity and Religion in Medieval Europe, Catholic University of America Press (2009), ISBN 9780813215808, page 87:
      The failure of the Fourth Lateran Council to take up Robert of Courson's reform agenda, despite Pope Innocent III's personal advocacy of religious charity and his patronage of the hospitaller movement, meant that the initiative to visit and correct caritative institutions would remain with individual bishops.

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

caritative

  1. feminine form of caritatif

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

caritative

  1. feminine plural of caritativo

Anagrams[edit]