constative

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Coined to translate the German konstatierend, using cōnstāt-, the perfect passive participial stem of the Latin verb cōnstō (I agree, correspond, or fit”, “I am certain, decided, or consistent), suffixed with the English -ive, suggesting a hypothetical Latin etymon of the form *cōnstātīvus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

constative (not comparable)

  1. (linguistics) Pertaining to an utterance relaying information and likely to be regarded as true or false.
    Statements are constative utterances.
    • One thing, however, that it will be more dangerous to do, and that we are very prone to do, is to take it that we somehow know that the primary or primitive use of sentences must be, because it ought to be, statemental or constative, in the philosophers' preferred sense of simply uttering something whose sole pretension is to be true or false and which is not liable to criticism in any other dimension. - "How To Do Things With Words" (1962) by JL Austin (OUP paperback edition, 72)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]